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Power Sharing and Power Relations After Civil War

Caroline A. Hartzell and Andreas Mehler, eds.
Power Sharing and Power Relations After Civil War
ISBN: 978-1-62637-767-7
$75.00
Forthcoming January 2019/260 pages
"Highly recommended.... This book moves power sharing from the niche field of conflict resolution to the much broader arena of comparative politics, where it belongs."—Roy Licklider, Rutgers University

"Interrogating the power in power sharing, the authors ... give a nuanced and accurate picture of how power sharing works, and help to explain why it sometimes leads to peace and other times to failure."—Allison McCulloch, Brandon University

DESCRIPTION

There are numerous studies on the role of power-sharing agreements in the maintenance of peace in postconflict states. Less explored, however, is the impact of power sharing on the quality of the peace. Do power-sharing institutions in fact transform the balance of power among actors in the aftermath of civil wars?  And if so, how? As they address these issues, seeking to establish a new research agenda, the authors provide a rich new analytical approach to understanding how power sharing actually works.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Caroline A. Hartzell is professor of political science at Gettysburg College. Andreas Mehler is director of the Arnold-Bergstraesser-Institut and professor of development policy and the theory of development at the University of Freiburg.

CONTENTS

  • Power Sharing and Power Relations in Postconflict States—A. Mehler and C.A. Hartzell.
  • THE IMPACT OF POWER SHARING ON POWER RELATIONS.
  • Government-Rebel Relations in the Wake of Power-Sharing Peace Agreements—M. Ottmann and J. Vüllers.
  • The Transformation of Armed Organizations into Political Parties—J. Ishiyama.
  • The Consequences of Power Sharing at the Local Level—A. Mehler et al.
  • POWER-SHARING MECHANISMS AT WORK.
  • Military Power Sharing: The Case of the Philippine Peace Agreement—R.A. Hall.
  • Territorial Power Sharing: The Cohesion of Opposition Movements—K.G. Cunningham.
  • Economic Power Sharing: Potentially Potent ... but Likely Limited—C.A. Hartzell.
  • POWER SHARING AND THE QUALITY OF PEACE.
  • Government Respect for the Physical Security of Postconflict Populations—M. Hoddie.
  • Shifting Public Attitudes? Power Sharing and Intergroup Tolerance—B.C. Hayes and J. Nagle.
  • Transitional Justice and Power Sharing: Promoting or Hijacking Elite Accountability?—C.L. Sriram.
  • CONCLUSION.
  • The What, How, Where, and Who of Postconflict Power Sharing—C.A. Hartzell and A. Mehler.