Lynne Rienner Publishers Logo

Property and the Making of the International System

Kurt Burch
 
ISBN: 978-1-55587-622-7
$24.00
1998/195 pages/LC: 97-21297
Critical Perspectives on World Politics

"Burch's brilliant case study of early–modern England reverses a familiar perspective of state- centric constructivists.... We gain a much clearer understanding of a crucial 'Westphalian moment' in human history."—Yale H. Ferguson

DESCRIPTION

This original work considers the emergence of the modern international system—that is, the global social context framing the diverse behaviors called international relations—in terms of the concepts of property and property rights.

Burch argues that the development of "property" is a crucial aspect of contemporary claims about the modern state, sovereignty, international law, state conflict, global political economy, and the world system as a whole. By investigating a concept, rather than a specific social condition, activity, or actor, he explores the socially shared understandings and meanings that inform individuals' outlooks and behaviors. It is these changing meanings and consequent behaviors, he demonstrates, that actually "make" the international system.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kurt Burch is professor of political science at St. Olaf College.

CONTENTS

  • How Did the International System Emerge?
  • CONSTITUTION AND CONSTRUCTION.
  • "Property" as a Constitutive Principle.
  • "Property" in 17th-Century England.
  • AGENTS AND PRACTICES.
  • Jurisprudents.
  • Statecraft Policymakers.
  • Entrepreneurs, Bankers, and Financiers.
  • CONCLUSIONS.