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South Africa's Struggle for Independent Education: The African Methodist Episcopal Church and the History of the Wilberforce Institute

Vusumuzi Rodney Kumalo
South Africa's Struggle for Independent Education: The African Methodist Episcopal Church and the History of the Wilberforce Institute
ISBN: 978-1-928246-49-7
$42.00
Forthcoming February 2023/250 pages
Distributed for Best Red, an imprint of HSRC Press

DESCRIPTION

At the start of the twentieth century, newly urbanized South Africans struggled with mainstream missionary education and its associated oppression, segregation, displacement, and not least, disillusionment. They shared far-reaching educational aspirations in the rapidly growing, cosmopolitan Johannesburg in the aftermath of the 1899–1902 war.

Vusumuzi Kumalo's insightful narrative relates how mission-educated graduates—despite their profoundly differing linguistic and regional backgrounds—came together to create the independent education movement, and how their determination led to the creation of the Wilberforce Institute, one of the first major independent African schools in segregationist South Africa.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 Vusumuzi Rodney Kumalo is senior lecturer in history at Nelson Mandela University.

CONTENTS

  • The Beginnings of Western Missionary Education in South Africa.
  • The State, Education, and the Demand for Labor: Grey’s Policy of Educating and Simultaneously Subjugating Africans.
  • The "School People" Resist and Start Asserting African Independence, 1880s–1890s.
  • The Ethiopianists and Their Struggle for Religious and Educational Independence in the ZAR, 1880s–1900.
  • The USA and AME Church Connections.
  • The South African Native Affairs Commission Reveals Dissatisfaction with White Missionary Education, 1903–1905.
  • Edward Tsewu and Local Activists Challenge the State and Win Land Rights for Africans in the Transvaal Colony, 1905.
  • Land and Opportunity: The Formation of Evaton, 1905.
  • The Long Walk of J.Z. Tantsi: The Beginnings of the Wilberforce Institute, 1905–1914.
  • Tolityi Magaya and the Growth of Wilberforce, 1917–1924.
  • "Up From Slavery:" The Colorful Rev. Francis Gow, Jr., Takes Charge, 1924–1934.
  • "Born for Leadership" but Dragged Down by Patriarchy and the Depression: The Eva Morake Years, 1934–1936.
  • Dr. A. B. Xuma Dips into His Own Pockets.
  • Doing Wright: The Reconstruction of Wilberforce, 1938–1940.
  • The Tenures of Dr. Jacob Nhlapo and the Sacrificing Superintendent, Dr. Rev. Josephus Coan, 1940–1947.
  • Dr. Nhlapo on National Duty: The Unification of African Languages, the Atlantic Charter, and Africans' Claims, 1942–1943.
  • End of an Era: The Arrival of Bantu Education, 1948–1955.
  • The Wilberforce Legacy: Alumni During and After Apartheid.