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African Actors in International Security: Shaping Contemporary Norms

Katharina P. Coleman and Thomas K. Tieku, editors

What impact have African actors had on perceptions of and responses to current international security challenges? Are there international peace and security norms with African roots? How can actors that lack the power and financial resources of Western states help to shape prevailing conceptions of appropriate behavior in international politics? Addressing these questions, the authors of    More >

African Actors in International Security: Shaping Contemporary Norms

The New ASEAN in Asia Pacific and Beyond

Shaun Narine

Refuting criticisms that call into question the effectiveness, and even the purpose, of ASEAN, Shaun Narine traces the organization's political and economic development and explores its impact within Southeast Asia and beyond. Narine considers ASEAN's role both regionally and with regard to the external powers—China, the United States, Japan, Russia, and increasingly    More >

The New ASEAN in Asia Pacific and Beyond

Biosecurity in Putin’s Russia

Raymond A. Zilinskas and Philippe Mauger

In March 2012, at a meeting convened by the recently reelected Russian president Vladimir Putin, Minister of Defense Serdyukov informed Mr. Putin that a plan was being prepared for "the development of weapons based on new physical principles: radiation, geophysical wave, genetic, psychophysical, etc." Subsequently, in response to concerns expressed both in Russia and abroad, the Russian    More >

Biosecurity in Putin’s Russia

Nontraditional Security Challenges in Southeast Asia: The Transnational Dimension

Amy L. Freedman and Ann Marie Murphy

With the countries of Southeast Asia increasingly challenged by a plethora of nontraditional security issues—climate change, food and water security, infectious diseases, and migration key among them—a number of important questions have emerged: What national and regional efforts are being made to address these issues? Why have some approaches proven more successful than others? How do    More >

Nontraditional Security Challenges in Southeast Asia: The Transnational Dimension

Getting Nuclear Weapons Right: Managing Danger and Avoiding Disaster

Stephen J. Cimbala

Can we avoid nuclear war? Why are we more at risk today than at the end of the Cold War? Can the world powers work together to ensure international stability? Stephen Cimbala provides a comprehensive assessment of these complex issues, ranging from the prospects for nuclear abolition, to the management of nuclear crises, to the imperative need for nuclear arms control worldwide.    More >

Getting Nuclear Weapons Right: Managing Danger and Avoiding Disaster

USAID in Bolivia: Partner or Patrón?

Lawrence C. Heilman

After Bolivia had received more than $4.7 billion from the US government to support 70 years of development efforts, why would Evo Morales abruptly expel USAID from the country in May 2013? The answer, alleges Lawrence Heilman, is rooted in a complex slice of history beginning with US assistance to Bolivia during World War II. Heilman explores that history from the perspectives of both the US    More >

USAID in Bolivia: Partner or Patrón?

Evolving Patterns of Peacekeeping: International Cooperation at Work

Hikaru Yamashita

Though historically the term peacekeeping has essentially been shorthand for UN peacekeeping, recent years have seen a proliferation of actors and initiatives in a shift to global peacekeeping cooperation. Hikaru Yamashita explores the motivations behind this development, what forms it is taking, and what it means for the international community. His comprehensive account of peacekeeping    More >

Evolving Patterns of Peacekeeping: International Cooperation at Work

When Democracies Choose War: Politics, Public Opinion, and the Marketplace of Ideas

Andrew Z. Katz

What is going on domestically when democracies choose war? Why do some wars of choice generate political opposition while others don't? Is there an internal mechanism that constrains the behavior of democracies when it comes to war? To answer these questions, Andrew Katz explores the relationship between public support for wars of choice and democratic norms in the marketplace of    More >

When Democracies Choose War: Politics, Public Opinion, and the Marketplace of Ideas

International Law in World Politics: An Introduction, 3rd edition

Shirley V. Scott

Reflecting a dramatically changing global context, the third edition of International Law in World Politics introduces the actors, structures, processes, and issues of international law in a way that makes sense to students of political science. Features of the new edition include: • current case studies that bring the subject to life. • an entirely new chapter on international    More >

International Law in World Politics: An Introduction, 3rd edition

The Geopolitics of Global Energy: The New Cost of Plenty

Timothy C. Lehmann, editor

In the all-encompassing energy realm, powerful state and private actors determine which of the world's many energy resources are developed ... and how societies are molded to accommodate those decisions. The authors of The Geopolitics of Global Energy delve into the energy realm, identifying the infrastructure investments of today that are shaping the use patterns and political dependencies of    More >

The Geopolitics of Global Energy: The New Cost of Plenty

The Management of UN Peacekeeping: Coordination, Learning, and Leadership in Peace Operations

Julian Junk, Francesco Mancini, Wolfgang Seibel, and Till Blume, eds.

This groundbreaking book brings the insights of organization and public administration theories to the analysis and enhancement of complex peace operations. Focusing on three essential and interrelated aspects of organizations—coordination, learning, and leadership—the authors bridge the gap between research on UN peacekeeping and the realities confronted both in the office and in the    More >

The Management of UN Peacekeeping: Coordination, Learning, and Leadership in Peace Operations

The Political Life of Mary Kaldor: Ideas and Action in International Relations

Melinda Rankin

Although more than a little controversial, Mary Kaldor's academic work and ideas have both stimulated and influenced debate in the Pentagon, the United Nations, the European Union, NATO, and beyond. How did this come about? And how did Kaldor reach the conclusions outlined in her seminal books? Melinda Rankin traces the evolution of Kaldor's work, revealing how her thinking developed    More >

The Political Life of Mary Kaldor: Ideas and Action in International Relations

War Games: US-Russian Relations and Nuclear Arms Control

Stephen J. Cimbala

Does it make sense for the United States to cooperate with Russia to resolve international security issues? Is it possible for the two countries to work together to reduce the dangers associated with nuclear weapons? Where does Vladimir Putin fit into the calculus? Engaging the debate on these contentious issues, Stephen Cimbala provides context for and policy-relevant analysis of current    More >

War Games:  US-Russian Relations and Nuclear Arms Control

The Changing Currents of Transpacific Integration: China, the TPP, and Beyond

Adrian H. Hearn and Margaret Myers, editors

This comprehensive assessment of transpacific economic integration explores the many ways that new approaches to multilateral cooperation, and notably the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), are transforming the regional landscape. Reflecting diverse views on the merits of new and wide-ranging agreements, the authors consider: To what extent will the TPP facilitate the US "pivot" to Asia    More >

The Changing Currents of Transpacific Integration: China, the TPP, and Beyond

Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration: Theory and Practice

Desmond Molloy

Disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration, or DDR, has been widely advocated for decades as an essential component of postconflict peacebuilding. But DDR in practice has generated more questions than answers. Does the approach work, contributing to postconflict stabilization and the reintegration of former combatants? Can it work better? What constitutes success? What accounts for failures?    More >

Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration: Theory and Practice

US Politics and the United Nations: A Tale of Dysfunctional Dynamics

Alynna J. Lyon

It is no secret that the US variously pulls away from the United Nations and embraces it as a significant venue for policy initiatives. But what explains this dramatic inconsistency? What is the logic of US multilateralism? Alynna Lyon explores the puzzling waxing and waning of US support for the UN, tracing events, actions, and decisions from the end of World War I to the present. Lyon weaves    More >

US Politics and the United Nations: A Tale of Dysfunctional Dynamics

The UN Association–USA: A Little Known History of Advocacy and Action

James Wurst

Little known outside a small community of insiders, the United Nations Association–USA has had an impact on both the UN and the US-UN relationship far greater than its size would suggest. James Wurst explores that impact as he traces the sometimes tortuous history of the UNA-USA from its earliest days to the present. Beginning with efforts in support of the creation of the United    More >

The UN Association–USA: A Little Known History of Advocacy and Action

Introducing Global Issues, 6th edition

Michael T. Snarr and D. Neil Snarr, editors

How is new technology—cyberwarfare, drones, and more—affecting global security? Are the 2015 Sustainable Development Goals having an impact? What progress are governments making in dealing with climate change? Is there a viable solution to the Syrian refugee crisis? How do we reconcile the concepts of universal human rights and national sovereignty? These are among the difficult    More >

Introducing Global Issues, 6th edition

Asia Pacific in World Politics, 2nd ed.

Derek McDougall

Capturing the most recent currents in world affairs—without sacrificing historical context—the second edition of Asia Pacific in World Politics reflects more than a decade of new developments. The focus on the region's major state actors has now been broadened to include an entirely new chapter on India and greatly expanded treatment of both Russia and Australia. The role of    More >

Asia Pacific in World Politics, 2nd ed.

The United States and Multilateral Treaties: A Policy Puzzle

Johannes Thimm

Why is the US so reluctant to join global multilateral treaties, even when those treaties are in line with its own policies? And how does it decide which treaties to ratify? Finding that the answers to these questions is less straightforward than may be apparent at first glance, Johannes Thimm explores the role of domestic politics in US unilateralism—and concludes that the real puzzle is    More >

The United States and Multilateral Treaties: A Policy Puzzle

Strategic Advising in Foreign Assistance: A Practical Guide

Nadia Gerspacher

Though advisers to host governments have become an integral part of foreign-assistance efforts in the realms of both development and peace processes, there has been scant information on how they can best achieve their goals. What skills, tools, and attributes do successful advisers need? How can they best share their expertise with their foreign counterparts in ways that build local capacities and    More >

Strategic Advising in Foreign Assistance: A Practical Guide

Movies, Myth, and the National Security State

Dan O’Meara, Alex Macleod, Frédérick Gagnon, and David Grondin

While analysts may agree that Hollywood movies have always both mirrored and helped to shape the tenor of their times, the question remains: Just how do they do it? And how do we identify the underlying political/ideological content of a film? Movies, Myth, and the National Security State answers these questions, exploring how Hollywood movies have served to propagate, or to debate, or    More >

Movies, Myth, and the National Security State

Latin America in International Politics: Challenging US Hegemony

Joseph S. Tulchin

In recent years, the countries of Latin America have moved out from under the shadow of the United States to become active players in the international system. What changed? Why? And why did it take so long for that change to happen? To answer those questions, Joseph S. Tulchin explores the evolving role of Latin American states in world affairs from the early days of independence to the    More >

Latin America in International Politics: Challenging US Hegemony

The UN Security Council in the 21st Century

Sebastian von Einsiedel, David M. Malone, and Bruno Stagno Ugarte, editors

Winner of the Friends of ACUNS Book Award, 2016! After grappling for two decades with the realities of the post–Cold War era, the UN Security Council must now meet the challenges of a resurgence of great power rivalry. Reflecting this new environment, The UN Security Council in the 21st Century provides a comprehensive view of the council's internal dynamics, its role and relevance in    More >

The UN Security Council in the 21st Century

The Nonprofit World: Civil Society and the Rise of the Nonprofit Sector

John Casey

John Casey explores the expanding global reach of nonprofit organizations, examining the increasingly influential role not only of prominent NGOs that work on hot-button global issues, but also of the thousands of smaller, little-known organizations that have an impact on people's daily lives. What do these nonprofits actually do? How and why have they grown exponentially? How are they    More >

The Nonprofit World: Civil Society and the Rise of the Nonprofit Sector

Why Peace Processes Fail: Negotiating Insecurity After Civil War

Jasmine-Kim Westendorf

Why do so many post–civil war societies continue to be characterized by widespread violence and political instability? Or, more succinctly, why do peace processes so often fail to consolidate peace? Addressing this question, Jasmine-Kim Westendorf explores how the international community engages in resolving civil wars—and clarifies why, despite the best of intentions and the    More >

Why Peace Processes Fail: Negotiating Insecurity After Civil War

International Organizations: The Politics and Processes of Global Governance, 3rd edition

Margaret P. Karns, Karen A. Mingst, and Kendall W. Stiles

The third edition of the award-winning International Organizations has been thoroughly revised and updated to take into account new developments and shifting power relations since 2009, as well as the most current scholarship. As before, the authors provide a comprehensive, in-depth examination of the full range of international organizations. New features of the book include attention to a    More >

International Organizations: The Politics and Processes of Global Governance, 3rd edition

The Politics of Global Governance: International Organizations in an Interdependent World, 5th edition

Brian Frederking and Paul F. Diehl, editors

Covering decisionmaking processes, peace and security affairs, and economic, social, and humanitarian issues, The Politics of Global Governance helps students of international organizations to understand the major themes, theories, and approaches central to the subject. The fifteen new selections in this fully revised edition reflect an increased emphasis on transnational governance and emerging    More >

The Politics of Global Governance: International Organizations in an Interdependent World, 5th edition

The US Military in Africa: Enhancing Security and Development?

Jessica Piombo, editor

Recent US security policy toward Africa has adopted a multidimensional approach—including the use of military assets to promote economic development and good governance—that has raised questions and generated considerable debate. Can actors like the US military develop appropriate methods to address both US and African interests? What blend of civilian and military programs are most    More >

The US Military in Africa: Enhancing Security and Development?

Connecting Peace, Justice, and Reconciliation

Elisabeth Porter

Can postconflict states achieve both peace and justice as they deal with a traumatic past? What role does reconciliation play in healing wounds, building trust, and rectifying injustices? This provocative book, incorporating the frameworks of both peace/conflict studies and transitional justice, explores the core challenges that war-torn states confront once the violence has ended. The book is    More >

Connecting Peace, Justice, and Reconciliation

Foreign Policy Analysis Beyond North America

Klaus Brummer and Valerie M. Hudson, editors

North American scholars typically do not hesitate to make pronouncements about foreign policy processes and outcomes in other countries. And despite ample evidence to the contrary, the perception that foreign policy analysis is still largely a North American scholarly enterprise persists. Foreign Policy Analysis Beyond North America challenges this perception, providing a rich overview of work by    More >

Foreign Policy Analysis Beyond North America

Human Rights in International Politics: An Introduction

Franke Wilmer

This comprehensive introduction to the study of human rights in international politics blends concrete developments with theoretical inquiry, illuminating both in the process. Franke Wilmer presents the nuts and bolts of human rights concepts, actors, and implementation before grappling with issues ranging from war and genocide to social and economic needs to racial and religious    More >

Human Rights in International Politics: An Introduction

US Missile Defense Strategy: Engaging the Debate

Michael Mayer

Why has the United States continued to develop ballistic missile defenses in an era of irregular warfare and asymmetric terrorist threats? How does missile defense contribute to US global strategy? Can the BMD system achieve the goals that lay behind its creation? Michael Mayer addresses these questions in his balanced approach to the contentious debate over the strategic value of missile    More >

US Missile Defense Strategy: Engaging the Debate

The World Since 1945: A History of International Relations, 8th edition

Wayne C. McWilliams and Harry Piotrowski

New emphasis on the impacts of globalization, events in the Middle East, and political and economic changes in East Asia—as well as new information and maps throughout—are among the features of this thoroughly revised edition of The World Since 1945. The text traces the major political, economic, and ideological patterns that have evolved in the global arena from the end of World    More >

The World Since 1945: A History of International Relations, 8th edition

The European Union: Readings on the Theory and Practice of European Integration, 4th edition

Brent F. Nelsen and Alexander Stubb, editors

The fourth edition of this popular reader, thoroughly updated, introduces students to both the concept of a united Europe and to integration theory. The expanded first two sections of the book now present the visions of the primary shapers of the union and its fundamental documents, as well as early currents in integration theory. The completely revised third and fourth sections explore recent    More >

The European Union: Readings on the Theory and Practice of European Integration, 4th edition

Security in South America: The Role of States and Regional Organizations

Rodrigo Tavares

What types of threats and conflicts affect the countries of South America? What roles can and should states and regional organizations play in maintaining both traditional and human security in the region? Ranging from armed conflicts, terrorism, and the arms trade to political crises, drug trafficking, and environmental concerns, Rodrigo Tavares provides a comprehensive discussion of the issues    More >

Security in South America: The Role of States and Regional Organizations

Debating Human Rights

Daniel P.L. Chong

Even as human rights provide the most widely shared moral language of our time, they also spark highly contested debates among scholars and policymakers. When should states protect human rights? Does the global war on terror necessitate the violation of some rights? Are food, housing, and health care valid human rights? Debating Human Rights introduces the theory and practice of international    More >

Debating Human Rights

China’s Regional Relations: Evolving Foreign Policy Dynamics

Mark Beeson and Fujian Li

Has China's much-discussed "charm offensive" come to an end? Are fears about the country's more assertive foreign policies justified? How will a rising China interact with its regional neighbors? Mark Beeson and Fujian Li address these questions by comprehensively exploring the nature, effectiveness, and implications of China's foreign policy strategy in Asia and Australia.    More >

China’s Regional Relations: Evolving Foreign Policy Dynamics

Development and Underdevelopment: The Political Economy of Global Inequality, 5th edition

Mitchell A. Seligson and John T Passé-Smith, editors

The fifth edition of this classic reader retains many of the articles that have made the book a must-assign for classes on development and political economy, but has been updated with 14 new chapters that look even more deeply at long-term factors that help to explain the origins and current trends in the gap between rich and poor. An entirely new section focuses on natural resource and    More >

Development and Underdevelopment: The Political Economy of Global Inequality, 5th edition

Prohibiting Chemical and Biological Weapons: Multilateral Regimes and Their Evolution

Alexander Kelle

Whether in the arsenals of states or of terrorist groups, chemical and biological weapons (CBW) are increasingly seen as one of the major threats to global security. Alexander Kelle provides a comprehensive assessment of the multilateral prohibition regimes that have been established to confront the risks posed by CBW in the context of rapid scientific and technological advances.    More >

Prohibiting Chemical and Biological Weapons: Multilateral Regimes and Their Evolution

Russia vs. the EU: The Competition for Influence in Post-Soviet States

Jakob Tolstrup

Do Russia and the European Union have any substantial influence over the political trajectories of post-Soviet states? Shedding new light on the interplay between domestic and external drivers of regime change, Jakob Tolstrup analyzes the impact of Russia and the EU on the democratization and autocratization processes in Belarus, Moldova, and Ukraine.    More >

Russia vs. the EU: The Competition for Influence in Post-Soviet States

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2013

Center on International Cooperation

The 2013 Annual Review of Global Peace Operations provides comprehensive information on all current military and—for the first time—civilian peace operations, more than 130 missions, launched by the United Nations, by regional organizations, and by coalitions. Unique in its breadth of coverage, it presents the most detailed collection of data on peace operations available. Features    More >

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2013

Assessing the War on Terror

Mohammed Ayoob and Etga Ugur, editors

Was the US-led war on terror, especially the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, a necessary response to the September 11 terrorist attacks? What did the two invasions accomplish? How have the fortunes of al-Qaeda and like-minded organizations been affected? The authors of this important contribution to ongoing debates address these questions as they assess the impact and implications of the war on    More >

Assessing the War on Terror

Women at War, Women Building Peace: Challenging Gender Norms

Joyce P. Kaufman and Kristen P. Williams

During times of civil conflict and war, why do some women turn to militant action while others seek peaceful resolutions? And why does the answer matter? Tackling these questions in their provocative analysis, Joyce Kaufman and Kristen Williams explore the full range of women's responses to armed struggles.     More >

Women at War, Women Building Peace: Challenging Gender Norms

Responding to Genocide: The Politics of International Action

Adam Lupel and Ernesto Verdeja, editors

What are the causes of genocide and mass atrocities? How can we prevent these atrocities or, when that is no longer possible, intervene to stop them? What are the impediments to timely and robust action? In what ways do political factors shape the nature, and results, of international responses? The authors of Responding to Genocide explore these questions, examining the many challenges involved    More >

Responding to Genocide: The Politics of International Action

Making Sense of International Relations Theory, 2nd edition

Jennifer Sterling-Folker, editor

What does it mean to adopt a realist, or a world systems, or a green approach to international relations? Does the plethora of “isms” have any relevance to the real world of global politics and policymaking? Making Sense of International Relations Theory addresses these questions by illustrating theories in action. With the 2003 invasion of Iraq by the US and its allies as a common    More >

Making Sense of International Relations Theory, 2nd edition

Gender and Foreign Policy in the Clinton Administration

Karen Garner

Though recent US government attention to global women's rights and empowerment is often presented as a new phenomenon, Karen Garner argues that nearly two decades ago the Clinton administration broke barriers to challenge women's unequal status vis-à-vis men around the world and to incorporate their needs into US foreign policy and aid programs. Garner draws on a wide range of    More >

Gender and Foreign Policy in the Clinton Administration

Migrant Remittances and Development in the Global Economy

Manuel Orozco

Manuel Orozco moves beyond the numbers to provide a uniquely comprehensive, historically informed overview and analysis of the complex role of migrant remittances in the global economy. How do patterns of migration and remittances differ across regions? What kinds of regulatory and institutional frameworks best support the contributions of remittances to local development? What has been the    More >

Migrant Remittances and Development in the Global Economy

Enabling Peace in Guatemala: The Story of MINUGUA

William Stanley

William Stanley tells the absorbing story of the UN peace operation in Guatemala's ten-year endeavor (1994-2004) to build conditions that would sustain a lasting peace in the country. Unusual among UN peace efforts because of its largely civilian nature, its General Assembly mandate, and its heavy reliance on UN volunteers to staff field offices, the mission (MINUGUA) focused initially on    More >

Enabling Peace in Guatemala: The Story of MINUGUA

Northeast Asia’s Nuclear Challenges

Su Hoon Lee, editor

An array of challenges threaten the peace and security of Northeast Asia, not least how to contain a nuclear North Korea and ensure the safety of the region’s nuclear power structure. Addressing multiple dimensions of these crucial issues, the authors of Northeast Asia's Nuclear Challenges highlight the cooperative approaches needed not only among the primary actors—China, the two    More >

Northeast Asia’s Nuclear Challenges

Recovering Nonviolent History: Civil Resistance in Liberation Struggles

Maciej J. Bartkowski, editor

This unique book brings to light the little-known, but powerful roles that civil resistance has played in national liberation struggles throughout history. Ranging from the American Revolution to Kosovo in the 1990s, from Egypt under colonial rule to present-day West Papua and Palestine, the authors of Recovering Nonviolent History consider several key questions: What kinds of civilian-based    More >

Recovering Nonviolent History: Civil Resistance in Liberation Struggles

Will This Be China’s Century?: A Skeptic’s View

Mel Gurtov

Mel Gurtov takes issue with the widespread view that China is on the way to rivaling or even displacing the United States as the dominant world power. Gurtov identifies serious constraints that will keep the country's leadership focused for the foreseeable future on challenges at home. Arguing that China's economic rise has exacerbated problems of social inequality, environmental    More >

Will This Be China’s Century?: A Skeptic’s View

Mexico and the United States: The Politics of Partnership

Peter H. Smith and Andrew Selee, editors

What are the strengths and weaknesses of the partnership between Mexico and the United States? What might be done to improve it? Exploring both policy and process, and ranging from issues of trade and development to concerns about migration, the environment, and crime, the authors of Mexico and the United States provide a comprehensive analysis of one of the world’s most complex bilateral    More >

Mexico and the United States: The Politics of Partnership

Damascus Diary: An Inside Account of Hafez al-Assad's Peace Diplomacy, 1990-2000

Bouthaina Shaaban, with a foreword by Fred Lawson

Bouthaina Shaaban worked closely with Syria's president Hafez al-Assad from 1990 until the time of his death, serving as both official interpreter and adviser. Her new book, part memoir and part historical account, takes the reader behind the closed doors of the Syrian Presidential Palace to provide uniquely Syrian perceptions of the failed Arab-Israel peace talks. Sharing firsthand stories    More >

Damascus Diary:  An Inside Account of Hafez al-Assad's Peace Diplomacy, 1990-2000

Exploring the Global Financial Crisis

Alan W. Cafruny and Herman M. Schwartz, editors

Did the financial crisis of 2008 and the subsequent recession rearrange the basic structures of the global economy? To answer that fundamental question, the authors of Exploring the Global Financial Crisis tackle a number of related questions: What has happened, for example, to global flows of people, goods, and capital? Will the euro and the dollar persist as global currencies? Can governments    More >

Exploring the Global Financial Crisis

Evaluating Democracy Assistance

Krishna Kumar

With the international community providing billions of dollars each year to promote democratic institutions/cultures in transitional and developing countries, rigorous evaluations have become essential for determining the effectiveness, as well as the future direction, of democracy assistance programs. Krishna Kumar provides a unique, practical guide to the on-the-ground tasks of evaluating and    More >

Evaluating Democracy Assistance

North American Regional Security: A Trilateral Framework?

Richard J. Kilroy, Jr., Abelardo Rodríguez Sumano, and Todd S. Hataley

Has the emergence of new transnational threats—terrorism, drug cartels, natural disasters—affected the dynamics of security relations among Canada, Mexico, and the United States? What is the likely future of these relations in a highly securitized world? Richard Kilroy, Abelardo Rodríguez Sumano, and Todd Hataley trace the evolution of security relations in North America from    More >

North American Regional Security: A Trilateral Framework?

Promoting Authoritarianism Abroad

Rachel Vanderhill

Recent years have seen efforts by several states to promote authoritarianism abroad, garnering the attention of foreign policy analysts—and raising a number of questions. What determines the success or failure of these efforts? How does the relationship between international and domestic politics play out? Do states comply with external pressures for ideological reasons, or primarily to    More >

Promoting Authoritarianism Abroad

Foreign Aid Competition in Northeast Asia

Hyo-sook Kim and David M. Potter, editors

In recent years, China, Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan have been transformed from aid recipients to aid donors, raising a number of questions. What motivated these four countries to embark on aid programs? Do their policies represent new approaches to poverty alleviation? Do they reinforce or disrupt the emerging consensus within the international community on aid policy harmonization and    More >

Foreign Aid Competition in Northeast Asia

US National Security: Policymakers, Processes, and Politics, 5th edition

Sam C. Sarkesian, John Allen Williams, and Stephen J. Cimbala

The fifth edition of US National Security retains the structure and approach that have made this text so successful, but it has been revised and updated throughout to reflect the challenges faced by the Obama administration. The choices necessary in an increasingly budget-constrained environment, the broader range of national security issues, and the evolving nature of counterinsurgency doctrine    More >

US National Security: Policymakers, Processes, and Politics, 5th edition

The Golden Fleece: Manipulation and Independence in Humanitarian Action

Antonio Donini, editor

A Global Observatory Must-Read Book in Peace and Security! The authors of this book take a long view—starting with the origins of organized humanitarianism in the mid-nineteenth century—to examine whether the politicization of aid has achieved its desired objectives, and whether the recent dramatic growth of relief work has made humanitarian efforts vulnerable to greater    More >

The Golden Fleece: Manipulation and Independence in Humanitarian Action

Robert Gilpin and International Relations: Reflections

Wolfgang Danspeckgruber, editor

The immense contributions of Robert Gilpin both to the study of international relations and in furthering the scholarship of others are reflected in this collection of essays by eminent political scientists. Gilpin's "soft realist," interdisciplinary approach has influenced generations of students and scholars in their study of international political economy, US foreign policy, IR    More >

Robert Gilpin and International Relations: Reflections

Peacebuilding Through Community-Based NGOs: Paradoxes and Possibilities

Max Stephenson and Laura Zanotti

Max Stephenson and Laura Zanotti explore the contested, but increasingly relevant, role that nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) play in resolving conflict and bringing about peace and security in the global arena. The authors draw on case studies from Haiti, Serbia, and Northern Ireland to highlight the range of ways that NGOs are involved in postconflict reconstruction efforts. In the    More >

Peacebuilding Through Community-Based NGOs: Paradoxes and Possibilities

Conflict-Related Sexual Violence: International Law, Local Responses

Tonia St. Germain and Susan Dewey, editors

The authors of this groundbreaking book explore the gap between policy and practice in international responses to conflict-related sexual violence. Drawing on their research in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, and Latin America, they offer fresh perspectives on, and practical approaches to, achieving justice for women who have survived wartime sexual assault.    More >

Conflict-Related Sexual Violence: International Law, Local Responses

US Policy in Afghanistan and Iraq: Lessons and Legacies

Seyom Brown and Robert H. Scales, editors

How have the costs, both human and material, of US involvement in the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq affected the country's will for conducting regime-change operations? What are the implications for issues of strategy? The authors of US Policy in Afghanistan and Iraq assess the impact of the two conflicts on US foreign policy, military planning, and capacities for counterinsurgency and    More >

US Policy in Afghanistan and Iraq: Lessons and Legacies

Humane Migration: Establishing Legitimacy and Rights for Displaced People

Christine G.T. Ho and James Loucky

Humane Migration offers a fresh look at the debate on international migration, particularly in the United States, Canada, and Europe. Arguing that migration should be considered  a human right, not a criminal act,  Christine Ho and James Loucky discuss why groups migrate, the obstacles that they face, and the benefits that they bring to their adopted communities.    More >

Humane Migration: Establishing Legitimacy and Rights for Displaced People

US Taiwan Strait Policy: The Origins of Strategic Ambiguity

Dean P. Chen

Why did the Truman administration reject a pragmatic approach to the Taiwan Strait conflict—recognizing Beijing and severing ties with Taipei—and instead choose the path of strategic ambiguity? Dean Chen sheds light on current US policy by exploring the thoughts and deliberations of President Truman and his top advisers, among them Dean Acheson, John Foster Dulles, Livingston Merchant,    More >

US Taiwan Strait Policy: The Origins of Strategic Ambiguity

The Collected Papers of Kofi Annan: UN Secretary-General, 1997-2006

Jean E. Krasno, editor

The thousands of documents in this five-volume set illuminate the complexity and texture of the workings of the United Nations as they trace the activities of Secretary-General Kofi Annan and the conceptual evolution of his ideas.  With the cooperation of the Executive Office of the Secretary-General in the release of previously classified material, the documents encompass internal notes,    More >

The Collected Papers of Kofi Annan: UN Secretary-General, 1997-2006

Nuclear North Korea: Regional Dynamics, Failed Policies, and Ideas for Ending a Global Stalemate

Su Hoon Lee, editor

North Korea's development of weapons of mass destruction has not only affected regional security, but also caused considerable anxiety at the global level. The authors of Nuclear North Korea explore the whats, whys, and hows of the DPRK's nuclear program and offer fresh ideas on how to contain the country's nuclear ambitions.    More >

Nuclear North Korea: Regional Dynamics, Failed Policies, and Ideas for Ending a Global Stalemate

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2012

Center on International Cooperation

Unique in its breadth of coverage, the Annual Review of Global Peace Operations presents the most detailed collection of data on peace operations—those launched by the UN, by regional organizations, and by coalitions—that is available. Features of the 2012 volume include: • a thematic focus on the role of peace operations in the extension of state authority • a summary    More >

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2012

The US-South Korea Alliance: Meeting New Security Challenges

Scott Snyder, editor

How can the United States and South Korea best cooperate to address new security challenges? Can the US-ROK alliance serve to advance South Korea's interests and at the same time help the US to more effectively pursue its own global and regional security objectives? In the context of these questions, the authors explore the possibilities for enhanced cooperation in both traditional and    More >

The US-South Korea Alliance: Meeting New Security Challenges

Explaining Foreign Policy: International Diplomacy and the Russo-Georgian War

Hans Mouritzen and Anders Wivel

Why would Georgia attack South Ossetia in August 2008, with Russian forces conducting exercises nearby? This remains a puzzle to analysts—on a not inconsiderable list of foreign policy puzzles. Hans Mouritzen and Anders Wivel use the example of the Russo-Georgian war to illustrate and evaluate their original model for explaining foreign policy behavior. The authors apply the model to the    More >

Explaining Foreign Policy: International Diplomacy and the Russo-Georgian War

Great Powers in the Changing International Order

Nick Bisley

What does it mean to be a great power? What role do great powers have in managing international order, and is that role still relevant in a globalizing world? Are new great powers likely to emerge? If so, to what effect? Addressing this set of questions, Nick Bisley provides a historically informed and theoretically grounded analysis of the part that great powers play in contemporary world    More >

Great Powers in the Changing International Order

Terrorism, Security, and Human Rights: Harnessing the Rule of Law

Mahmood Monshipouri

Scholars and policymakers disagree on the most effective way to counter transnational terrorism, generating debate on a range of questions: Do military interventions increase or decrease the recruitment capability of transnational terrorists? Should we privilege diplomacy over military force in the campaign against terror? Can counterterrorist measures be applied without violating human rights?    More >

Terrorism, Security, and Human Rights: Harnessing the Rule of Law

Western Sahara: Anatomy of a Stalemate?, 2nd edition

Erik Jensen

Responding to the changes that have swept across North Africa since the first edition of this book was published, Erik Jensen sheds new light on the enduring dispute over Western Sahara. Jensen reviews the history of the dispute, beginning with its colonial roots, and explains how and why attempts made by the OAU and, more persistently, the UN failed to achieve a formula for resolution    More >

Western Sahara: Anatomy of a Stalemate?, 2nd edition

EU Security Policy: What It Is, How It Works, Why It Matters

Michael Merlingen

What is the European Union's security and defense policy (CSDP)? How does it work? Does it make a difference in international security affairs? How do other global actors react to Europe’s new assertiveness? And how do theories of international relations account for the trajectory of EU integration in the high politics of national security? In this comprehensive survey and analysis,    More >

EU Security Policy: What It Is, How It Works, Why It Matters

Advocacy Across Borders: NGOs, Anti-Sweatshop Activism and the Global Garment Industry

Shae Garwood

Particularly compelling reading after the April 2013 building collapse that killed more than 1,000 garment workers in Bangladesh, Advocacy Across Borders explores the strategies, strengths—and limitations—of Northern-based NGOs that seek to improve conditions for the millions of workers in the clothing and textile industry who face long hours, inadequate wages, and abuse. Garwood    More >

Advocacy Across Borders: NGOs, Anti-Sweatshop Activism and the Global Garment Industry

UN Peacekeeping in Africa: From the Suez Crisis to the Sudan Conflicts

Adekeye Adebajo

Nearly half of all UN peacekeeping missions in the post–Cold War era have been in Africa, and the continent currently hosts the greatest number (and also the largest) of such missions in the world. Uniquely assessing five decades of UN peacekeeping in Africa, Adekeye Adebajo focuses on a series of questions: What accounts for the resurgence of UN peacekeeping efforts in Africa after the Cold    More >

UN Peacekeeping in Africa: From the Suez Crisis to the Sudan Conflicts

Jean Monnet: Unconventional Statesman

Sherrill Brown Wells

How did Jean Monnet, an entrepreneurial internationalist who never held an elective office, never joined a political party, and never developed any significant popular following in his native France, become one of the most influential European statesmen of the twentieth century? How did he conceive of, and become instrumental in achieving, European integration? Addressing these questions, Sherrill    More >

Jean Monnet: Unconventional Statesman

China Engages Latin America: Tracing the Trajectory

Adrian H. Hearn and José Luis León-Manríquez, editors

What inroads is China making in Latin America? In China Engages Latin America, experts from three continents provide local answers to this global question. The authors explore the multiple motivations driving the establishment of new Sino–Latin American linkages, the nature of those linkages, and the reactions that they have generated. They also examine how China–Latin America    More >

China Engages Latin America: Tracing the Trajectory

African Security and the African Command: Viewpoints on the US Role in Africa

Terry Buss, Joseph Adjaye, Donald Goldstein, and Louis Picard, editors

In 2007, the Bush administration created a new military presence in Africa—AFRICOM (US Africa Command)—which has been vigorously debated ever since. Some see AFRICOM as the answer to an African security system crippled by a lack of resources, widespread politicization, and institutional weakness. Others claim that the program is nothing more than another attempt by the US to secure its    More >

African Security and the African Command: Viewpoints on the US Role in Africa

Migration in the Global Political Economy

Nicola Phillips, editor

How does the evolution of global capitalism shape patterns and processes of migration? How does migration in turn shape and intersect with the forces at work in the global economy? How should we understand the relationship between migration and development, and how is migration connected with patterns of poverty and inequality? How are processes of migration and immigration governed in different    More >

Migration in the Global Political Economy

Conflict in Macedonia: Exploring a Paradox in the Former Yugoslavia

Sasho Ripiloski

How did Macedonia attain its status as the only Yugoslav republic to achieve a nonviolent transition to independence in the early 1990s? And why did the initial peace fail to endure? Sasho Ripiloski traces Macedonia's peaceful extrication from the Yugoslav morass and then examines the new country's subsequent state-building efforts and offers an explanation for its later collapse into    More >

Conflict in Macedonia: Exploring a Paradox in the Former Yugoslavia

The World Food Programme in Global Politics

Sandy Ross

How has the World Food Programme come to be so well-regarded—even in the US—despite being part of the much-maligned UN system? What are the political and institutional conditions that have enabled it to accrue legitimacy as an international organization? And how much substance lies behind the perceptions of its effectiveness? Finding the answers to these questions in his analysis of    More >

The World Food Programme in Global Politics

Strategic Moral Diplomacy: Understanding the Enemy’s Moral Universe

Lyn Boyd-Judson

Is it possible for nations to negotiate in the context of seemingly incompatible moral values? Lyn Boyd-Judson answers yes—and argues that it can be strategically useful, as well as ethical, to assume that an enemy has just moral concerns. Boyd-Judson uses the US and UN negotiations with Iran, Libya, Zimbabwe, and Haiti to illustrate the practical application of strategic moral diplomacy.    More >

Strategic Moral Diplomacy: Understanding the Enemy’s Moral Universe

The Politics of Privatization: Wealth and Power in Postcommunist Europe

John A. Gould

In this remarkable story of postcommunist politics gone wrong, John Gould explores privatization’s role in the scramble for wealth and power in postcommunist Europe. Gould engages the core debates on privatization. Does democratic development facilitate effective capitalist reform, or vice versa? How do political legacies shape privatization choices? Is simultaneous transition feasible?    More >

The Politics of Privatization: Wealth and Power in Postcommunist Europe

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2011

Center on International Cooperation

Unique in its breadth of coverage, the Annual Review of Global Peace Operations presents the most detailed collection of data on peace operations—those launched by the UN, by regional organizations, by coalitions, and by individual nations—that is available. Features of the 2011 volume include: • a thematic focus on current operations in periods of transition • a summary    More >

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2011

Dual Disasters: Humanitarian Aid After the 2004 Tsunami

Jennifer Hyndman

What happens when a humanitarian crisis with political roots interacts with a humanitarian crisis induced by environmental disaster? That is the question at the core of Dual Disasters. Focusing on Sri Lanka and Indonesia, countries that were dealing with complex upheavals long before the 2004 tsunami struck, Jennifer Hyndman shows how the storm shifted the goals of international aid, altered    More >

Dual Disasters: Humanitarian Aid After the 2004 Tsunami

Agriculture and Reform in Syria

Raymond Hinnebusch, Atieh El Hindi, Mounzer Khaddam, and Myriam Ababsa

How have recent economic reforms affected Syria's agricultural sector? Addressing this question, the authors give particular attention to the implications of the reforms for rural society.    More >

Agriculture and Reform in Syria

Human Rights in the Global Political Economy: Critical Processes

Tony Evans

Tony Evans critically investigates the theory and practice of human rights in the current global order. Evans covers a range of contentious debates as he considers critiques of the prevailing conceptions of human rights. He then explores the changing global context of human rights issues, the nature and status of human rights within that context, and recent institutional responses. With its    More >

Human Rights in the Global Political Economy: Critical Processes

Women and War: Gender Identity and Activism in Times of Conflict

Joyce P. Kaufman and Kristen P. Williams

Joyce Kaufman and Kristen Williams draw on both traditional and feminist IR theory to explore the roles that women play leading up to, during, and after conflict situations, how they spur and respond to nationalist and social movements, and how conceptions of gender are deeply intertwined with ideas about citizenship and the state.    More >

Women and War: Gender Identity and Activism in Times of Conflict

Globalization in Africa: Recolonization or Renaissance?

Pádraig Carmody

Is globalization good for Africa? Pádraig Carmody explores the evolving nature and impact of globalization throughout the continent, as China, the US, and other economic powers exert their influence. Drawing especially on the cases of Chad, Sudan, and Zambia, Carmody considers whether the resource curse that has for so long plagued Africa can become a blessing. He also evaluates the    More >

Globalization in Africa: Recolonization or Renaissance?

Evaluating Peace Operations

Paul F. Diehl and Daniel Druckman

Winner of the International Association for Conflict Management's Outstanding Book Award, 2012! There has been a great deal written on why peace operations succeed or fail.... But how are those judgments reached? By what criteria is success defined? Success for whom? Paul Diehl and Daniel Druckman explore the complexities of evaluating peace operation outcomes, providing an original,    More >

Evaluating Peace Operations

The Change Imperative: Creating the Next Generation NGO

Paul David Ronalds

Paul David Ronalds draws on his experience as deputy CEO of World Vision Australia to offer a practical guide for international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) as they face the challenges of the Twenty-First century. Covering such concrete issues as advocacy, finance, technology, and human resources, as well as the more ambiguous areas of legitimacy and state sovereignty, his book is    More >

The Change Imperative: Creating the Next Generation NGO

Syria on the Path to Economic Reform

Samir Seifan

Noted Syrian political and economic analyst Samir Seifan provides an overview and assessment of the first five years of President Bashar al-Assad's program for economic reform. Seifan also examines the forces for—and obstacles to—reform in Syria and outlines in detail how the regime's goal of transition to a "social market economy" might best be achieved. The book    More >

Syria on the Path to Economic Reform

Why Enduring Rivalries Do—or Don’t—End

Eric W. Cox

Why do some enduring, violent rivalries between states end peacefully, while others drag on interminably or cease only with the complete collapse or defeat of one of the states? Eric Cox provides extensive evidence to support his explanation of how these disputes end, comparing successful and failed attempts to terminate rivalries in Latin America and the Middle East.    More >

Why Enduring Rivalries Do—or Don’t—End

Islam and Christianity in the Horn of Africa: Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan

Haggai Erlich

Can Christianity and Islam coexist? Or are Muslims and Christians destined to delegitimize and even demonize each other? Tracing the modern history of the region where the two religions first met, and where they are engaged now in active confrontation, Haggai Erlich finds legacies of both tolerance and militancy. Erlich's analysis of political, military, and diplomatic developments in the    More >

Islam and Christianity in the Horn of Africa: Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan

The Police in War: Fighting Insurgency, Terrorism, and Violent Crime

David H. Bayley and Robert M. Perito

Frustrated efforts in both Iraq and Afghanistan give urgency to the question of how to craft effective, humane, and legitimate security institutions in conflict-ridden states—and whether legitimate policing can in fact be developed in the midst of insurgency and terrorism. David H. Bayley and Robert M. Perito confront these questions head on. Against the backdrop of failed US attempts to    More >

The Police in War: Fighting Insurgency, Terrorism, and Violent Crime

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2010

Center on International Cooperation

Unique in its breadth of coverage, the Annual Review of Global Peace Operations presents the most detailed collection of data on peace operations—those launched by the UN, by regional organizations, by coalitions, and by individual nations—that is available. Features of the 2010 volume include:                      More >

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2010

Civil Society and Peacebuilding: A Critical Assessment

Thania Paffenholz, editor

Responding to the burgeoning interest in the role of civil society in peace processes, this groundbreaking collaborative effort identifies the constructive functions of civil society in support of peacebuilding both during and in the aftermath of armed conflict. The authors also highlight the factors that support those functions and the obstacles to their fulfillment. A comprehensive analytical    More >

Civil Society and Peacebuilding: A Critical Assessment

The Power Curse: Influence and Illusion in World Politics

Giulio M. Gallarotti

Can increasing power in international politics be a bad thing for nations? In this provocative book, Giulio Gallarotti argues that the answer is clearly yes—as demonstrated by a series of examples that span geography, history, and issues. Gallarotti systematically develops the idea of the power curse and its concomitant, the power illusion. Establishing that the process by which nations    More >

The Power Curse: Influence and Illusion in World Politics

The Princeton Process on the Crime of Aggression: Materials of the Special Working Group on the Crime of Aggression, 2003-2009

Stefan Barriga, Wolfgang Danspeckgruber, Christian Wenaweser

This compilation of documents related to the "Princeton Process"—five rounds of intergovernmental negotiations held by the UN's Special Working Group on the Crime of Aggression (SWGCA) at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School in 2004-2009—captures the complexities of the issues at stake. The volume includes all reports of the SWGCA, as well as selected    More >

The Princeton Process on the Crime of Aggression: Materials of the Special Working Group on the Crime of Aggression, 2003-2009

The European Union and the Global South

Fredrik Söderbaum and Patrik Stålgren, editors

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! The development of coherent and effective relations with other regions and countries is one of the most challenging tasks faced by the European Union. This original volume explores the EU’s engagement with the global South, focusing on three controversial policy areas: economic cooperation, development cooperation, and conflict    More >

The European Union and the Global South

Security and Development: Searching for Critical Connections

Neclâ Tschirgi, Michael S. Lund, and Francesco Mancini, editors

Although policymakers and practitioners alike have enthusiastically embraced the idea that security and development are interdependent, the precise nature and implications of the dynamic interplay between the two phenomena have been far from clear. The authors of Security and Development: Searching for Critical Connections realistically assess the promise and shortcomings of integrated    More >

Security and Development: Searching for Critical Connections

Coalition Politics and the Iraq War: Determinants of Choice

Daniel F. Baltrusaitis

Why do states join ad hoc military coalitions? What motivated South Korea to contribute significantly to the Iraq War "coalition of the willing," while such steadfast allies as Turkey and Germany resisted US pressure to become burden-sharing partners? Drawing on his extensive examination of South Korean, German, and Turkish politics in the approach to and during the Iraq War, Daniel    More >

Coalition Politics and the Iraq War: Determinants of Choice

Beyond Market Forces: Regulating the Global Security Industry

James Cockayne, with Emily Speers Mears, Iveta Cherneva, Alison Gurin, Sheila Oviedo, and Dylan Yaeger

Private military and security companies play an increasingly visible role in conflict and postconflict situations. Properly regulated, they may offer efficient and responsive means for governments to deliver security in insecure environments. But well-publicized abuses suggest that an adequate regulatory framework is still urgently needed. In response, Beyond Market Forces articulates clear    More >

Beyond Market Forces: Regulating the Global Security Industry

Arms Control and Cooperative Security

Jeffrey A. Larsen and James J. Wirtz, editors

Reflecting the ongoing debate about the value of traditional arms control in today’s security environment, Arms Control and Cooperative Security thoroughly covers this complex topic. The authors critically review the historical record, highlight recent changes in the security arena, and consider the likelihood of new arms control agreements. Throughout, the discussion is presented in the    More >

Arms Control and Cooperative Security

Peacebuilding and Transitional Justice in East Timor

James DeShaw Rae

Did the United Nations successfully help to build a just, peaceful state and society in postconflict East Timor? Has transitional justice satisfied local demands for accountability and/or reconciliation? What lessons can be learned from the UN’s efforts? Drawing on extensive field work, James DeShaw Rae offers a grassroots perspective on the relationship between peacebuilding and    More >

Peacebuilding and Transitional Justice in East Timor

A Fragile Balance: Re-examining the History of Foreign Aid, Security, and Diplomacy

Louis A. Picard and Terry F. Buss

Louis Picard and Terry Buss trace the history of US foreign aid from the earliest assumptions of manifest destiny to the present, placing their discussion within the context of broader foreign policy and security goals. Effectively combining policy and normative perspectives, their book serves as a provocative introduction to the subject.    More >

A Fragile Balance: Re-examining the History of Foreign Aid, Security, and Diplomacy

How the Aid Industry Works: An Introduction to International Development

Arjan de Haan

How the Aid Industry Works provides a concise introduction to the business of development—to what aid practices are, and how they have evolved. Arjan de Haan also assesses the arguments of both proponents and opponents of aid and presents illustrative examples of actual projects and programs. Ideal for students encountering the subject of development for the first time, the book also serves    More >

How the Aid Industry Works: An Introduction to International Development

Guerrilla Diplomacy: Rethinking International Relations

Daryl Copeland

Daryl Copeland charts the course for a new kind of diplomacy, one in tune with the demands of today's interconnected, technology driven world. Eschewing platitudes and broadly rethinking issues of security and development, Copeland provides the tools needed to frame and manage issues ranging from climate change to pandemic disease to asymmetrical conflict and weapons of mass destruction.    More >

Guerrilla Diplomacy: Rethinking International Relations

The Problem of Force: Grappling with the Global Battlefield

Simon W. Murden

Why, despite indisputably superior military might, have the US-led military interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq been so fraught with setbacks? Does it make sense in today’s security environment to use military force to achieve strategic objectives? How does the contemporary battlefield function? Addressing these questions, Simon Murden explores the contradictions inherent in attempting to    More >

The Problem of Force:  Grappling with the Global Battlefield

Crime and the Global Political Economy

H. Richard Friman, editor

Crime has gone global. Conventional explanations point to ways in which criminals have exploited technological innovations, deregulation, and free markets to triumph over state sovereignty. Crime and the Global Political Economy reveals a more complex reality. Taking as a point of departure the fact that state and societal actors are challenged by—and complicit in—the expansion of    More >

Crime and the Global Political Economy

China in Latin America: The Whats and Wherefores

R. Evan Ellis

With China on the minds of many in Latin America—from politicians and union leaders to people on the street, from business students to senior bankers—a number of important questions arise. Why, for example, is China so rapidly expanding its ties with the region? What is the nature of the new connection, and how will it affect institutions, economic structures, politics, and society? R.    More >

China in Latin America: The Whats and Wherefores

Four Generations of Norteños: New Research from the Cradle of Mexican Migration

Wayne A. Cornelius, David Scott FitzGerald, and Scott Borger, editors

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! Drawing on decades of fieldwork in a high-emigration town in central Mexico, as well as a thousand recent interviews, the authors chart the town's evolution from a source of short-term contract laborers during World War II to a present-day exporter of undocumented and legal migrants, many of whom now settle permanently in the US and have US-born children.    More >

Four Generations of Norteños: New Research from the Cradle of Mexican Migration

Peace, Justice, and Security Studies: A Curriculum Guide, 7th edition

Timothy A. McElwee, B. Welling Hall, Joseph Liechty, and Julie Garber editors

Fully revised to reflect the realities of the post–September 11 world, this acclaimed curricular reference provides a comprehensive review of the field of peace, justice, and security studies. Seven introductory essays systematically cover the state of the discipline today, surveying current intellectual and pedagogical themes. These are followed by seventy classroom-tested syllabuses    More >

Peace, Justice, and Security Studies: A Curriculum Guide, 7th edition

Security Cooperation in Africa: A Reappraisal

Benedikt Franke

In the midst of the atrocities reported in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the seemingly constant strife in the Horn of Africa, and the ongoing violence in Darfur, how do we make sense of the simultaneous increase in interstate security cooperation in Africa? To what extent, and why, does this cooperation differ from previous initiatives? In what direction is it heading? Benedikt Franke assesses    More >

Security Cooperation in Africa: A Reappraisal

Transforming Defense Capabilities: New Approaches for International Security

Scott Jasper, editor

In the face of today's security challenges, there is widespread recognition of the need to think and act in new ways to ensure both national and collective security interests. Transforming Defense Capabilities succinctly describes what transformation means in this context, why it is essential, and how to translate innovative concepts into relevant, feasible, and useful practice. The authors    More >

Transforming Defense Capabilities: New Approaches for International Security

The Myth of the Free Market: The Role of the State in a Capitalist Economy

Mark A. Martinez

Mark Martinez reveals how the myth of the "invisible hand" has distorted our understanding of the development and actual performance of modern capitalist markets. Martinez draws on historical cases to make it clear that political processes and the state are not only instrumental in making capitalist markets work, but that there would be no capitalist markets or wealth creation without    More >

The Myth of the Free Market: The Role of the State in a Capitalist Economy

Imbalance of Power: US Hegemony and International Order

I. William Zartman, editor

Now that the clear delineations of the Cold War era are behind us, what are the contours of the international system? And what does the new reality mean for the United States, the acknowledged hegemon? Provocatively applying IR theory to the world of policy analysis, Imbalance of Power showcases policy debates about the nature of both the international order and the role of the US within it.    More >

Imbalance of Power: US Hegemony and International Order

The Ethics of Global Governance

Antonio Franceschet, editor

Ethics is treated in this provocative book not as a set of rules, nor as a topic for philosophical discussion, but as an inescapable and necessary aspect of political life. The authors analyze ethical controversies central to global governance as states and other actors navigate a complex world order. Covering the gamut of fundamental issues—sovereignty, the role of civil society, UN    More >

The Ethics of Global Governance

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2009

Center on International Cooperation

Unique in its breadth of coverage, the Annual Review of Global Peace Operations presents the most detailed collection of data on peace operations—those launched by the UN, by regional organizations, by coalitions, and by individual nations—that is available. Features of the 2009 volume include:                      More >

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2009

The World Trade Organization: Changing Dynamics in the Global Political Economy

Anna Lanoszka

Providing context for the Doha Round stalemate, this comprehensive examination of the World Trade Organization covers all the basics: the WTO's history, its structure, and its practices and concerns. Lanoszka begins with an overview of the world trading system since the end of World War II and explains the profound changes brought about by the establishment of the WTO. A discussion of the    More >

The World Trade Organization: Changing Dynamics in the Global Political Economy

China's Rise and the Two Koreas: Politics, Economics, Security

Scott Snyder

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! With China now South Korea's number one trading partner and destination for foreign investment and tourism, what are the implications for politics and security in East Asia? Scott Snyder explores the transformation of the Sino–South Korean relationship since the early 1990s. Snyder considers the strategic significance of recent developments in    More >

China's Rise and the Two Koreas:  Politics, Economics, Security

Foreign Investment and Domestic Development: Multinationals and the State

Jenny Rebecca Kehl

How is it that billions of dollars flow through the developing world without altering its reality of poverty and scarcity? Jenny Kehl explores the crucial relationship between foreign direct investment and domestic development, focusing on the wide variation in the capacity of governments to negotiate FDI to the advantage of their citizens. To isolate the influence of political factors, Kehl    More >

Foreign Investment and Domestic Development: Multinationals and the State

International Law: Classic and Contemporary Readings, 3rd Edition

Charlotte Ku and Paul F. Diehl, editors

Covering subjects ranging from treaties and dispute resolution to the environment, human rights, and terrorism, this anthology reveals the influence of international law on political behavior. The third edition has been updated with 13 new chapters that discuss emerging actors and structures, address the most pressing current issues, and consider the future evolution of the international legal    More >

International Law: Classic and Contemporary Readings, 3rd Edition

The Dynamics of Diplomacy

Jean-Robert Leguey-Feilleux

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! This comprehensive text accessibly covers the evolution, politics, and practice of diplomacy. Leguey-Feilleux first provides a solid grounding in the history of traditional diplomacy, beginning with ancient times. He then reviews the forces of contemporary change—dramatic developments in both international politics and the realm of    More >

The Dynamics of Diplomacy

Shaping German Foreign Policy: History, Memory, and National Interest

Anika Leithner

Reconciling the imperatives of Germany’s national identity and its national interest has been a challenge for the country’s policymakers since the end of the Cold War. Anika Leithner explores how (and how much) the past continues to shape Germany’s foreign policy behavior in the first decade of the twenty-first century. Leithner argues that, while German foreign policy is still    More >

Shaping German Foreign Policy: History, Memory, and National Interest

Humanitarian Crises and Intervention: Reassessing the Impact of Mass Media

Walter C. Soderlund, E. Donald Briggs, Kai Hildebrandt, and Abdel Salam Sidahmed

Why has the international community been unwilling, time and time again, to address the humanitarian crises that have killed millions of people in postcolonial states and forced many millions more to leave their homes and livelihoods? Focusing on the role of major media outlets, the authors of Humanitarian Crises and Intervention provide a unique look at violent conflicts in Angola, Burundi,    More >

Humanitarian Crises and Intervention: Reassessing the Impact of Mass Media

Diasporas and Development: Exploring the Potential

Jennifer M. Brinkerhoff, editor

For some time in diaspora studies, attention to remittances has overshadowed the growing impact of emigrant groups both within the social and political arenas in their homelands and with regard to fundamental economic development. The authors of Diasporas and Development redress this imbalance, focusing on three core issues: the responses of diasporas to homeland conflicts, strategies for    More >

Diasporas and Development: Exploring the Potential

Corruption and Development Aid: Confronting the Challenges

Georg Cremer

Although corruption has always been a quietly recognized aspect of development aid programs, the taboo against openly discussing it is only now being widely overcome. Georg Cremer systematically addresses the subject, exploring the nature and impact of corruption, the conditions under which it is most likely to take hold, and the strategies that can enable aid organizations, both NGOs and those in    More >

Corruption and Development Aid: Confronting the Challenges

Building States to Build Peace

Charles T. Call with Vanessa Wyeth, editors

How can legitimate and sustainable states best be established in the aftermath of civil wars? And what role should international actors play in supporting the vital process? Addressing these questions, the authors of Building States to Peace explore the core challenges involved in institutionalizing postconflict states. The combination of thematic chapters and in-depth case studies covers the    More >

Building States to Build Peace

Driven by Drugs: US Policy Toward Colombia, 2nd Edition

Russell Crandall

In the years since the first edition of Driven by Drugs was published, there have been dramatic changes in US policy toward Colombia, as well as in domestic Colombian politics. This new edition traces developments in both arenas, bringing the story current through the administrations of George W. Bush and Álvaro Uribe.     More >

Driven by Drugs: US Policy Toward Colombia, 2nd Edition

Women in Iraq: The Gender Impact of International Sanctions

Yasmin Husein Al-Jawaheri

Yasmin Husein Al-Jawaheri argues that the explosion of violence against Iraqi women since the removal of Saddam Hussein should not have taken people by surprise. The deterioration of gender relations was in fact, as she vividly demonstrates, a direct result of a decade of international economic sanctions. Al-Jawaheri explores the gender-related impact of those sanctions in the areas of    More >

Women in Iraq: The Gender Impact of International Sanctions

EU Enlargement and the Transatlantic Alliance: A Security Relationship in Flux

Sven Biscop and Johan Lembke, editors

What is the interplay between EU enlargement and a fluctuating transatlantic security partnership? Will the accession of new EU members reinforce this partnership, or instead increase the EU's assertiveness as an independent foreign policy actor? The authors of EU Enlargement and the Transatlantic Alliance find answers in an examination of broader EU security strategies, the foreign and    More >

EU Enlargement and the Transatlantic Alliance: A Security Relationship in Flux

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2008

Center on International Cooperation

Unique in its breadth of coverage, the Annual Review of Global Peace Operations presents the most detailed collection of data on peace operations—those launched by the UN, by regional organizations, by coalitions, and by individual nations—that is available. Features of the 2008 volume include: a summary analysis of the trends and developments in peace operations through 2007 a    More >

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2008

Born of War: Protecting Children of Sexual Violence Survivors in Conflict Zones

Charli Carpenter, editor

Born of War reveals the multiple impacts of armed conflict on children born of wartime rape and sexual exploitation—and calls for greater consideration of this group in international human rights discourse and practice, where their experiences have been largely ignored.    More >

Born of War: Protecting Children of Sexual Violence Survivors in Conflict Zones

Development and Humanitarianism: Practical Issues

Deborah Eade and Tony Vaux, editors

Humanitarian intervention invariably rubs shoulders with politics—awkwardly, and sometimes with tragic results.  Development and Humanitarianism draws from the contents of the acclaimed journal Development in Practice to address the dilemmas that aid agencies and their frontline staff face in interpreting the principles of humanitarianism in situations where they risk being manipulated    More >

Development and Humanitarianism: Practical Issues

Complex Political Victims

Erica Bouris

Looking beyond the standard discourse about political victims, with its dichotomies of good and evil—and believing that more can be done to effectively recognize and respond to political victims—Erica Bouris interrogates the assumptions that are typically made about the identity of victims, the roles that these individuals play in conflict, and their needs in the postconflict period.    More >

Complex Political Victims

Invisible Governance: International Secretariats in Global Politics

John Mathiason

John Mathiason, a member of the UN Secretariat for 25 years, offers a behind-the-scenes view of the work of a core, but often "invisible," element of world politics. Drawing on his extensive knowledge of a variety of international organizations, Mathiason traces the evolution of the international public sector, explains how secretariats function, discusses the creation of regimes to    More >

Invisible Governance: International Secretariats in Global Politics

Governing the Americas: Assessing Multilateral Institutions

Gordon Mace, Jean-Philippe Thérien, and Paul Haslam, editors

Governing the Americas presents the first systematic assessment of the functioning of hemispheric institutions since the introduction of the Summit of the Americas process in 1994.   The authors evaluate the effectiveness of inter-American institutions with regard to core issues of democratic governance, security, trade, and economic development. They consider, as well, the impact of the    More >

Governing the Americas: Assessing Multilateral Institutions

Globalization and Change in Asia

Dennis A. Rondinelli and John M. Heffron, editors

Globalization and Change in Asia explores three decades of adjustment on the part of governments, civil society, and the private sector to the complex new forces of international competition. Recognizing that the benefits of globalization have not accrued equally to all Asian countries, nor to all stratums of society, the authors seek lessons that can help shape development policy to effect the    More >

Globalization and Change in Asia

Business Power in Global Governance

Doris Fuchs

Has the political power of big business, particularly transnational corporations (TNCs), increased in our globalizing world? What, if anything, constrains TNCs? Analyzing the role of business in the global arena, this systematic and theoretically grounded book addresses these questions. Fuchs considers the implications of expanded lobbying efforts by businesses and business associations, the    More >

Business Power in Global Governance

The Future for Palestinian Refugees: Toward Equity and Peace

Michael Dumper

From the dilapidated camps of Lebanon to the eye of the storm in Gaza, Palestinian refugees continue to be a focus of world attention. The Future for Palestinian Refugees addresses in depth this most difficult of the outstanding problems impeding peace in the Middle East. Michael Dumper maps the contours of the issue, with special reference to wider international practice and its possible    More >

The Future for Palestinian Refugees: Toward Equity and Peace

The Global Politics of AIDS

Paul G. Harris and Patricia D. Siplon, editors

With more than 40 million people living with HIV/AIDS—and more than 25 million dead from related diseases since the early 1980s—the need to understand the causes and impact of the pandemic is manifest. In response, The Global Politics of AIDS explores power and politics at multiple levels, ranging from individual behavior to corporate boardrooms to international institutions and    More >

The Global Politics of AIDS

Bioterrorism: Confronting a Complex Threat

Andreas Wenger and Reto Wollenmann, editors

Especially since the anthrax attacks of 2001, the issue of bioterrorism has been controversial: Are governments underestimating the potential hazard of biological toxins, as some claim, or is the danger in fact exaggerated? What are the policy options for dealing with such a complex threat? The authors of this book offer a reasoned assessment of the issues at the core of the    More >

Bioterrorism: Confronting a Complex Threat

Iraq: Preventing a New Generation of Conflict

Markus E. Bouillon, David M. Malone, and Ben Rowswell editors

Is an end to the violence in Iraq, and the establishment of an enduring peace within a unified state, a realistic goal? Addressing this question, the authors of Iraq Preventing a New Generation of Conflict consider the sources of conflict in the country and outline the requirements for a successful peacebuilding enterprise.    More >

Iraq: Preventing a New Generation of Conflict

The Morality of War: A Reader

David Kinsella and Craig L. Carr, editors

When and why is war justified? How, morally speaking, should wars be fought? The Morality of War confronts these challenging questions, surveying the fundamental principles and themes of the just war tradition through the words of the philosophers, jurists, and warriors who have shaped it. The collection begins with the foundational works of just war theory, as well as those of two competing    More >

The Morality of War: A Reader

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2007

Center on International Cooperation

Unique in its breadth and depth of coverage, the Annual Review of Global Peace Operations presents the most detailed collection of data on peace operations—those launched by the UN, by regional organizations, by coalitions, and by individual nations—that is available. Features of the 2007 volume include:   an introductory essay on the priorities and processes crucial to    More >

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2007

Europe at Bay: In the Shadow of US Hegemony

Alan W. Cafruny and J. Magnus Ryner

Europe at Bay was completed just before the onset of the financial crisis, and two years before the Eurozone crisis emerged. In contrast to mainstream European integration scholarship that celebrated the Euro at the time, Alan Cafruny and Magnus Ryner issued warnings that have since been validated by events. Focusing on the underlying social forces and power relations in Europe, Cafruny and    More >

Europe at Bay: In the Shadow of US Hegemony

Power and Security in Northeast Asia: Shifting Strategies

Byung-Kook Kim and Anthony Jones, editors

As China's influence rises and the US attempts to retain its primacy in Northeast Asia, the countries of the region are reconsidering their own security needs—and availing themselves of new opportunities. Power and Security in Northeast Asia explores the complexities of current security strategies in the region, revealing motivations and policies not often considered by traditional    More >

Power and Security in Northeast Asia: Shifting Strategies

Peacekeeping in Sierra Leone: The Story of UNAMSIL

'Funmi Olonisakin

The first in a series of "inside" histories, Peacekeeping in Sierra Leone relates how a small country—one insignificant in the strategic considerations of the world powers—propelled the United Nations to center stage in a crisis that called the UN's very authority into serious question; and how the UN mission in Sierra Leone was transformed from its nadir into what is now    More >

Peacekeeping in Sierra Leone: The Story of UNAMSIL

Exploring International Human Rights: Essential Readings

Rhonda L. Callaway and Julie Harrelson-Stephens, editors

Bringing together key selections that represent the full range of philosophical debates, policy analyses, and first-hand accounts, the editors offer a comprehensive and accessible set of readings on the major themes and issues in the field of international human rights. The reader has been carefully designed to enhance students' understanding not only of human rights, but also of differing    More >

Exploring International Human Rights: Essential Readings

Women Building Peace: What They Do, Why It Matters

Sanam Naraghi Anderlini

How and why do women's contributions matter in peace and security processes? Why should women's activities in this sphere be explored separately from peacebuilding efforts in general? Decisively answering these questions, Sanam Anderlini offers a comprehensive, cross-regional analysis of women's peacebuilding initiatives around the world.   Anderlini also traces the evolution of    More >

Women Building Peace: What They Do, Why It Matters

Understanding Development: Theory and Practice in the Third World, 3rd Edition

John Rapley

This accessible text provides both an assessment of the current state of development theory and an extensive survey of the impact of evolving policies and practices throughout the developing world. Rapley critically traces the evolution of development theory from its strong statist orientation in the early postwar period, through the neoclassical phase, to the present consensus on people-centered    More >

Understanding Development: Theory and Practice in the Third World, 3rd Edition

Global Politics in the Human Interest, 5th edition

Mel Gurtov

Traditional studies of world politics emphasize the struggle between states as they search for national security. But increasing interdependence has transformed the world political agenda, creating the need for new tools to explain the changing reality of global politics. Global Politics in the Human Interest provides those tools.   This fully revised fifth edition thoroughly covers    More >

Global Politics in the Human Interest, 5th edition

The UN Secretariat: A Brief History

Thant Myint-U and Amy Scott

Reform of the UN Secretariat has been a subject of debate for nearly as long as the UN has existed. Providing much-needed background for more informed discussions of the subject, this new book provides a concise history of the Secretariat—a little understood, but critically important part of the UN system.      More >

The UN Secretariat: A Brief History

Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts? Assessing "Whole of Government" Approaches to Fragile States

Stewart Patrick and Kaysie Brown

With fragile states representing both a core development challenge and a source of major threats to international security, the search for strategies to assist the recovery of failing and war-torn countries has been high on the agendas of donor countries. Stewart Patrick and Kaysie Brown candidly assess efforts to bring together diplomatic, defense, and development instruments—the so-called    More >

Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts? Assessing "Whole of Government" Approaches to Fragile States

Transnational Civil Society: An Introduction

Srilatha Batliwala and L. David Brown, editors

Transnational Civil Society provides an accessible introduction to the history, nature, and achievements of influential transnational civil society networks and movements. The authors examine important transnational movements in the areas of labor, the environment, human rights, women's rights, peace, and economic justice. Showing the breadth and depth of transnational civil society, they    More >

Transnational Civil Society: An Introduction

Humanitarian Alert: NGO Information and its Impact on US Foreign Policy

Abby Stoddard

Do humanitarian NGOs function as autonomous—and even influential—nonstate actors with their own value-driven agendas? Or do they serve merely as the paid agents of national governments, providing a service-delivery function in line with those nations' foreign policy goals? Shedding light on this often-contentious issue, Abby Stoddard uses examples of US policy in the conflicts in    More >

Humanitarian Alert: NGO Information and its Impact on US Foreign Policy

Piecing a Democratic Quilt? Regional Organizations and Universal Norms

Edward McMahon and Scott Baker

Providing essential analysis and insights, Edward McMahon and Scott Baker assess the various approaches that regional organizations have been developing to promote their member- states' adherence to democratic principles.    More >

Piecing a Democratic Quilt? Regional Organizations and Universal Norms

Non-State Actors in the Human Rights Universe

George Andreopoulos, Zehra Kabasakal Arat, and Peter Juviler, editors

Departing from analyses that focus on the role of the state in the arena of human rights, the authors of this original collection offer conceptually sophisticated, but accessible, discussions of the role and responsibility of nonstate actors with regard to the violation, promotion, and protection of human rights.    More >

Non-State Actors in the Human Rights Universe

Peace Operations Seen From Below: UN Missions and Local People

Béatrice Pouligny

Béatrice Pouligny argues that much of what is being rebuilt in societies emerging from war —or in some cases what is continuing to be destroyed—often lies in the ordinary daily lives of both local populations and the staff of UN peacekeeping missions. Pouligny's close analysis of UN interventions—in Cambodia, Somalia, Mozambique, El Salvador, Bosnia, Haiti, Sierra    More >

Peace Operations Seen From Below: UN Missions and Local People

Promises Not Kept: Poverty and the Betrayal of Third World Development, 7th edition

John Isbister

The seventh edition of this perennial favorite includes discussions of major initiatives such as the Millennial Development Goals, changes in international politics and approaches to global terrorism following the US-led military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, and updated throughout.    More >

Promises Not Kept: Poverty and the Betrayal of Third World Development, 7th edition

The Great Turning: From Empire to Earth Community

David C. Korten

In his classic When Corporations Rule the World, David Korten focused on the destructive nature of the global corporate economy and helped to spark a worldwide resistance movement. Now, in The Great Turning, he goes further to argue that the corporate consolidation of power is but one manifestation of what he calls "Empire": the organization of society through hierarchy and violence that    More >

The Great Turning: From Empire to Earth Community

Coming of Age in a Globalized World: The Next Generation

J. Michael Adams and Angelo Carfagna

J. Michael Adams and Angelo Carfagna emphasize the importance of education in a society that constantly faces challenges of change and conflict. Providing a comprehensive survey of current issues in global politics, they argue convincingly that, to succeed in today's environment, individuals must understand the driving forces of globalization and the trends that are likely to shape our future.    More >

Coming of Age in a Globalized World: The Next Generation

Promoting Independent Media: Strategies for Democracy Assistance

Krishna Kumar

Krishna Kumar surveys the nature and significance of international aid designed to build and strengthen independent news media in support of democratization and development. Providing the first comprehensive coverage of media assistance programs, Kumar discusses the evolution, focus, and overall impact of a range of intervention strategies. He also presents seven in-depth case studies based on    More >

Promoting Independent Media: Strategies for Democracy Assistance

Bridging the Divide: Peacebuilding in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Edy Kaufman, Walid Salem, and Juliette Verhoeven editors

In the midst of the continuing violence of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, there are many who remain committed to moving forward on the road to peace. The Palestinian and Israeli contributors to this book, recognizing the great potential of civil society and NGOs for the peacebuilding process, focus on realistic opportunities for conflict transformation.The book includes a directory of    More >

Bridging the Divide: Peacebuilding in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Superpower on Crusade: The Bush Doctrine in US Foreign Policy

Mel Gurtov

With its emphasis on unilateralism, preemptive attack, and regime change, US foreign policy under George W. Bush continued the longstanding US quest for primacy—but with some radical departures from previous approaches.   Superpower on Crusade offers a critical exploration of the origins and implementation of the Bush Doctrine. Gurtov first traces the sources of US missionary and    More >

Superpower on Crusade: The Bush Doctrine in US Foreign Policy

Africa-US Relations: Strategic Encounters

Donald Rothchild and Edmond J. Keller, editors

Reflecting the debate between state-centered and human-security approaches to security strategy, Africa-US Relations explores the interactions between the US and African countries in a wide spectrum of key arenas.   The authors range from such traditional security issues as peacekeeping and terrorism to concerns with HIV/AIDS, environmental degradation, aid policies, and international    More >

Africa-US Relations: Strategic Encounters

Global Corporate Power

Christopher May, editor

Exploring the diverse ways that corporations affect the practices and structures of the global political economy, this innovative work addresses three fundamental questions: How can the corporation be most usefully conceptualized within the field of IPE? Does global governance succeed in constraining the power of multinational corporations? To what extent has the movement for corporate social    More >

Global Corporate Power

International Relations in Action: A World Politics Simulation

Brock F. Tessman

This hands-on exercise allows students to relate the concepts and issues at the foundation of global politics to the realities of international politics today. As influential leaders in the fictional world of Politica, each team of students governs a country with a unique history, geography, and culture. The teams must use strategy and negotiation to succeed  and survive  seeking to achieve    More >

International Relations in Action: A World Politics Simulation

The Iraq War: Causes and Consequences

Rick Fawn and Raymond Hinnebusch, editors

While the war in Afghanistan saw most industrial countries back the US-led campaign, the subsequent war in Iraq profoundly divided international opinion—and likely represents a watershed in the post-Cold War international order. The Iraq War examines the full range of explanations of the conflict, as well as its significance for the Middle East, for key international relationships, and for    More >

The Iraq War: Causes and Consequences

The Age of War: The United States Confronts the World

Gabriel Kolko

In this comprehensive, succinct—and provocative—overview of five decades of US foreign policy, Gabriel Kolko gives special emphasis to the period since 2000. Kolko argues that, as dangerous as the Cold War era was, we face far more instability and unpredictability now; the international environment is qualitatively more precarious than ever. Ranging from the Vietnam War to the war in    More >

The Age of War: The United States Confronts the World

Promoting Democracy in Postconflict Societies

Jeroen de Zeeuw and Krishna Kumar, editors

Few would dispute the importance of donating funds and expertise to conflict-ridden societies—but such aid, however well meant, often fails to have the intended effect. This study critically evaluates international democratization assistance in postconflict societies to discern what has worked, what has not, and how aid programs can be designed to have a more positive impact. The authors    More >

Promoting Democracy in Postconflict Societies

The Resilience of the State: Democracy and the Challenges of Globalization

Samy Cohen, translated by Jonathan Derrick

In this politically incorrect essay, Samy Cohen, one of France's leading specialists in international relations, attacks an established sacred cow: the theory of state decline.   According to the conventional wisdom, states are on the wane under the impact of globalization, and frontiers are being gradually abolished; the outcome could be at worst an anarchic world, at best an international    More >

The Resilience of the State: Democracy and the Challenges of Globalization

International Law and Politics: Key Documents

Shirley V. Scott, editor

Unique in its breadth of coverage, this carefully designed collection presents the key documents of international law at the global level. The collection encompasses the full spectrum of central issues, with the documents grouped in eight subject areas: foundations, the use of force, arms control, international crime, human rights, humanitarian law, the environment, and the global commons. A    More >

International Law and Politics: Key Documents

The Meaning of Military Victory

Robert Mandel

How has the concept of victory evolved as the nature of conflict itself has changed across time, circumstance, and culture? And to what end? Robert Mandel addresses these questions, consider¬ing the meanings, misperceptions, and challenges associated with military victory in the context of the nontraditional wars of recent decades.   Without an understanding of precisely what victory    More >

The Meaning of Military Victory

Europe and the Middle East: In the Shadow of September 11

Richard Youngs

In the wake of September 11, the European Union proclaimed a new commitment to encouraging processes of political liberalization in the Middle East, and a plethora of initiatives were introduced to that end. Richard Youngs offers a thorough analysis of the policies actually followed by the EU—by national governments, as well as collectively—in the intervening several    More >

Europe and the Middle East: In the Shadow of September 11

How States Fight Terrorism: Policy Dynamics in the West

Doron Zimmermann and Andreas Wenger, editors

As national governments struggle to cope with the complex threat of mass-casualty terrorist attacks, there is an ongoing debate about the best approaches to counterterrorism policy. The authors of How States Fight Terrorism explore the dynamics of counterterrorism policy development in Europe and North America. A series of case studies examine security concerns, political debates and policy    More >

How States Fight Terrorism: Policy Dynamics in the West

Aiding Peace?: The Role of NGOs in Armed Conflict

Jonathan Goodhand

As nongovernmental organizations play a growing role in the international response to armed conflict—tasked with mitigating the effects of war and helping to end the violence—there is an acute need for information on the impact they are actually having. Addressing this need, Aiding Peace? explores just how NGOs interact with conflict and peace dynamics, and with what results. Jonathan    More >

Aiding Peace?: The Role of NGOs in Armed Conflict

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2006

Center on International Cooperation

The world now spends close to $5 billion annually on United Nations peace operations staffed by more than 80,000 military and civilian personnel, and commitments to comparable operations outside the UN command structure are on an even greater scale. The Annual Review of Global Peace Operations is the first comprehensive source of information on this crucial topic, designed for students, scholars,    More >

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2006

Sudan: The Elusive Quest for Peace

Ruth Iyob and Gilbert M. Khadiagala

The formal division in 2011 of Africa's largest state into two new states—Sudan (the Republic of the Sudan) and South Sudan (the Republic of South Sudan)—was the result of civil strife that had endured for generations. In the years leading up to this resolution, Sudan suffered from the failure of both regional and international actors to effectively come to terms with the scope of    More >

Sudan: The Elusive Quest for Peace

Tourists, Migrants, and Refugees: Population Movements in Third World Development

Milica Z. Bookman

As travelers increasingly seek out the exotic wildlife and idyllic sunsets of the developing world, a complex relationship involving tourism, the migration of workers, and the involuntary displacement of peoples has emerged. Milica Bookman explores that relationship—and the connection between population movements and economic development in third world countries. Bookman's multicountry    More >

Tourists, Migrants, and Refugees: Population Movements in Third World Development

NGOs in International Politics

Shamima Ahmed and David M. Potter

NGOs in International Politics surveys the full spectrum of NGO activities and relationships in a manner accessible to undergraduate students. In Part 1 of the book, the authors discuss nongovernmental organizations in light of IR theories, survey the development of NGOs, and highlight their relations with states, international organizations, and international politics overall. The case studies    More >

NGOs in International Politics

The Democratic Republic of Congo: Economic Dimensions of War and Peace

Michael Nest, with François Grignon and Emizet F. Kisangani

Despite the prominent role that competition over natural resources has played in some of Africa's most intractable conflicts, little research has been devoted to what the economic dimensions of armed conflict mean for peace operations and efforts to reconstruct war-torn states. Redressing this gap, this volume analyzes the challenges that the war economy posed, and continues to pose, for    More >

The Democratic Republic of Congo: Economic Dimensions of War and Peace

A Civil Republic: Beyond Capitalism and Nationalism

Severyn T. Bruyn

Severyn T. Bruyn argues that—in a world of injustice, ecological destruction, violence and instability, weapons of mass destruction, and the rise of authoritarian government—our ability to craft a secure future lies in creating a "civil republic." Bruyn envisions a system of governance that merges core human values of civil society into a political economy that has reigned    More >

A Civil Republic: Beyond Capitalism and Nationalism

Drugs and Democracy in Latin America: The Impact of U.S. Policy

Coletta A. Youngers and Eileen Rosin, editors

Although the US has spent more than $25 billion on international drug-control programs over the last two decades, it has failed to reduce the supply of cocaine and heroin entering the country. It has, however, succeeded in generating widespread, often profoundly damaging, consequences, most notably in Latin America and the Caribbean. The authors of Drugs and Democracy in Latin America offer a    More >

Drugs and Democracy in Latin America: The Impact of U.S. Policy

Critical Security Studies and World Politics

Ken Booth, editor

Realist assumptions of security studies increasingly have been challenged by an approach that places the human being, rather than the state, at the center of security concerns. This text is an indispensable statement of the ideas of this critical security project, written by some of its leading exponents.   The book is structured around three concepts—security, community, and    More >

Critical Security Studies and World Politics

International Security: An Analytical Survey

Michael Sheehan

Michael Sheehan provides a masterly survey of the varied positions that scholars have adopted in interpreting "security"—one of the most contested terms in international relations—and proposes a synthesis that both widens and deepens our understanding of the concept.   Sheehan first outlines the classical realist approach of Morgenthau and Carr and the ideas of their    More >

International Security: An Analytical Survey

Profiting from Peace: Managing the Resource Dimensions of Civil War

Karen Ballentine and Heiko Nitzschke, editors

Providing both a means and a motive for armed conflict, the continued access of combatants in contemporary civil wars to lucrative natural resources has often served to counter the incentives for peace. Profiting from Peace offers the first comprehensive assessment of the practical strategies and tools that might be used effectively, by both international and state actors, to help reduce the    More >

Profiting from Peace: Managing the Resource Dimensions of Civil War

Peacebuilding in Postconflict Societies: Strategy and Process

Ho-Won Jeong

This integrative discussion of the multiple dimensions of peacebuilding in postconflict societies offers a systematic approach to strategies and processes for long-term social, political, and economic transformation.   Ho-Won Jeong links short-term crisis-intervention efforts to a sustained process that encompasses the entire complex environment of a conflict. His broad analytic framework    More >

Peacebuilding in Postconflict Societies: Strategy and Process

The Migration Reader: Exploring Politics and Policies

Anthony M. Messina and Gallya Lahav, editors

The Migration Reader introduces the key articles and documents that analyze the complex phenomenon of transnational migration and the challenges it poses for contemporary societies, states, and international relations. Enhanced by the editors' commentary, the selections identify concepts and trends in international migration, review the historical origins of contemporary migration and refugee    More >

The Migration Reader: Exploring Politics and Policies

Negotiating Privacy: The European Union, the United States, and Personal Data Protection

Dorothee Heisenberg

How did the European Union come to be the global leader in setting data privacy standards? And what is the significance of this development? Dorothee Heisenberg traces the origins of the stringent EU privacy laws, the responses of the United States and other governments, and the reactions and concerns of a range of interest groups. Analyzing the negotiation of the original 1995 EU Data Protection    More >

Negotiating Privacy: The European Union, the United States, and Personal Data Protection

Child Labor and Human Rights: Making Children Matter

Burns H. Weston, editor

The International Labour Organization estimated in 2000 that, of the approximately 246 million children engaged in labor worldwide, 171 million were working in situations harmful to their development. Child Labor and Human Rights provides a comprehensive overview of the phenomenon of child labor from a human rights perspective. The authors consider the connections between human rights and abusive    More >

Child Labor and Human Rights: Making Children Matter

Cowardly Lions: Missed Opportunities to Prevent Deadly Conflict and State Collapse

I. William Zartman

What would have happened had the "road not taken" been the chosen action in past conflict interventions? What can we learn from a close look at alternatives that were not selected? Drawing on six detailed case studies (the Balkans, Haiti, Lebanon, Liberia, Somalia, and Zaire/Congo), I. William Zartman identifies a series of missed opportunities—options that arguably would have    More >

Cowardly Lions: Missed Opportunities to Prevent Deadly Conflict and State Collapse

International Organizations and Democracy: Accountability, Politics, and Power

Thomas D. Zweifel

Do international organizations represent the interests of the global citizenry? Or are they merely vehicles for the agendas of powerful nations and special interests? Thomas Zweifel explores this increasingly contentious issue, deftly blending history, theory, and case studies.   Zweifel's analysis covers both regional organizations (e.g., the EU, NAFTA, NATO, the AU) and such global    More >

International Organizations and Democracy: Accountability, Politics, and Power

Demilitarizing Politics: Elections on the Uncertain Road to Peace

Terrence Lyons

With the increasing use of elections as a tool for peacebuilding after civil war, the question of why some postconflict elections succeed and others fail is a crucial one. Tackling this question, Terrence Lyons finds the answer in the internal political dynamics that occur between the cease-fire and the voting. Lyons shows that the promise of elections can provide the incentive for the    More >

Demilitarizing Politics: Elections on the Uncertain Road to Peace

People Building Peace II: Successful Stories of Civil Society

Paul van Tongeren, Malin Brenk, Marte Hellema, and Juliette Verhoeven, editors

Individuals can make a difference working for peace worldwide. That is the message of People Building Peace II, an inspiring collection of stories of how "ordinary" men and women have played a crucial part in conflict prevention and peacebuilding.   Thematic chapters, illustrated with compelling case studies, present new trends in the role of civil society in conflict    More >

People Building Peace II: Successful Stories of Civil Society

The Norms of War: Cultural Beliefs and Modern Conflict

Theo Farrell

Although the horrors of war are manifest, academic debate is dominated by accounts that reinforce the concept of warfare as a rational project. Seeking to explain this paradox—to uncover the motivations at the core of warring communities—Theo Farrell explores the cultural forces that have shaped modern Western conflict.   Farrell finds that the norms of war—shared beliefs    More >

The Norms of War: Cultural Beliefs and Modern Conflict

Making China Policy: From Nixon to G.W. Bush

Jean A. Garrison

What explains the twists and turns in US-China relations since Richard Nixon initiated a policy of engagement in the early 1970s? Addressing this question, Jean Garrison examines the politics behind US China policy across six administrations from Richard Nixon to George W. Bush. Garrison finds that a focus on the internal decisionmaking process is key to understanding both continuity and change    More >

Making China Policy: From Nixon to G.W. Bush

Intellectual Property Rights: A Critical History

Christopher May and Susan K. Sell

With intellectual property widely acknowledged today as a key component of economic development, those accused of stealing knowledge and information are also charged with undermining industrial innovation, artistic creativity, and the availability of information itself. How valid are these claims? Has the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs) Agreement ushered in a new,    More >

Intellectual Property Rights: A Critical History

Guns and Butter: The Political Economy of International Security

Peter Dombrowski, editor

Reflecting the growing interest among scholars and practitioners in the relationship between security affairs and economics, this new volume explores the nature of that relationship in the first decade of the 21st century.   Among the issues addressed in the book are the impact of the events of September 11 and of the US response. The authors also consider whether the challenges of the    More >

Guns and Butter: The Political Economy of International Security

Getting Globalization Right: The Dilemmas of Inequality

Joseph S. Tulchin and Gary Bland, editors

Getting Globalization Right explores political and economic changes in seven new democracies that have in common both a movement toward greater integration with the world economy and the challenges posed by persistent or even increasing domestic economic inequalities.   The authors argue that, without effective national policies to dampen the effects of globalization, the short-term impact    More >

Getting Globalization Right: The Dilemmas of Inequality

Politics and Process at the United Nations: The Global Dance

Courtney B. Smith

How does the United Nations actually work? How does it reconcile the diverse interests of 191 sovereign member states—plus those of the multinational corporations that lobby it, the numerous NGOs with which it interacts, and the enormous international secretariat that services it—in the search for effective solutions to the myriad problems it confronts daily? Politics and Process at    More >

Politics and Process at the United Nations: The Global Dance

Globalization and Social Exclusion: A Transformationalist Perspective

Ronaldo Munck

When global economies integrate, what disintegrates as a result? The answer, Ronaldo Munck contends, is social equality. To illustrate how globalization deepens existing inequities, Munck focuses on disparities in living conditions; the feminization of poverty; the global sex trade; the effects of racism, migration, and multiculturalism; and the formation and political manifestations of social    More >

Globalization and Social Exclusion: A Transformationalist Perspective

Creating a Better World: Interpreting Global Civil Society

Rupert Taylor, editor

The term "global civil society" has become a catchphrase of our times. But efforts to define and interpret what global civil society actually is have led to ambiguity and dispute. The authors of Creating a Better World present illustrative cases of groups within civil society—from the Seattle and Genoa protesters to transnational grassroots movements such as Slum/Shack Dwellers    More >

Creating a Better World: Interpreting Global Civil Society

Ethics and Global Politics: The Active Learning Sourcebook

April Morgan, Lucinda Joy Peach, and Colette Mazzucelli, editors

Who should take moral and ethical responsibility for the world's critical issues? What obligations do individuals and multinational corporations have to the rest of the world, and whose cultural values must they consider? How do you empower your student to construct their own perspectives on global concerns such as human rights, global warming, corporate social responsibility, and security    More >

Ethics and Global Politics: The Active Learning Sourcebook

Searching for Peace in Asia Pacific: An Overview of Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding Activities

Annelies Heijmans, Nicola Simmonds, and Hans van de Veen, editors

Third in an acclaimed series, Searching for Peace in Asia Pacific offers critical background information, up-to-date surveys of the conflicts in the region and a directory of some 400 relevant organizations working in the field of conflict prevention and peacebuilding. The authors provide detailed, objective descriptions of ongoing activities, as well as assessments of the prospects for conflict    More >

Searching for Peace in Asia Pacific: An Overview of Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding Activities

War Economies in a Regional Context: Challenges of Transformation

Michael Pugh and Neil Cooper, with Jonathan Goodhand

  Confronting the corrosive influence that war economies typically have on the prospects for peace in war-torn societies, this study critically analyzes current policy responses and offers a thought-provoking foundation for the development of more effective peacebuilding strategies. The authors focus on the role played by trade in precipitating and fueling conflict, with particular emphasis    More >

War Economies in a Regional Context: Challenges of Transformation

The UN Security Council: From the Cold War to the 21st Century

David M. Malone, editor

The nature and scope of UN Security Council decisions—significantly changed in the post-Cold War era—have enormous implications for the conduct of foreign policy. The United Nations Security Council offers a comprehensive view of the council both internally and as a key player in world politics. Focusing on the evolution of the council's treatment of key issues, the authors    More >

The UN Security Council: From the Cold War to the 21st Century

Exploring Subregional Conflict: Opportunities for Conflict Prevention

Chandra Lekha Sriram and Zoe Nielsen, editors

The causes of violent conflict, as well as approaches to conflict prevention, have been studied extensively, but only recently has attention been given to the subregional dynamics of internal wars. The authors of this original collection explore conflicts in Africa, Central Asia, and Central America, seeking new insights that can provide the foundation for more nuanced, more effective preventive    More >

Exploring Subregional Conflict: Opportunities for Conflict Prevention

War Crimes and Realpolitik: International Justice from World War I to the 21st Century

Jackson Nyamuya Maogoto

From the very early stages in the development of international law, the nature of the state-centric international system has dictated that law play second fiddle to the hard realities of power politics. War Crimes and Realpolitik explores the evolution and operation of the international criminal justice system, highlighting the influences of politics.   Maogoto takes the reader behind the    More >

War Crimes and Realpolitik: International Justice from World War I to the 21st Century

The United Nations: Confronting the Challenges of a Global Society

Jean E. Krasno, editor

Despite the high visibility of the United Nations in various peacekeeping operations, the enormous role that it plays in the global arena goes largely unnoticed. This new book focuses on that larger role, bringing to life the evolutionary process of multilateral interaction that is the foundation of the organization, the sometimes heated politics behind its operations, and the key personalities    More >

The United Nations: Confronting the Challenges of a Global Society

Knowledge Power: Intellectual Property, Information, and Privacy

Renée Marlin-Bennett

Knowledge Power introduces the interconnected roles of intellectual property, information, and privacy and explores the evolution of the domestic and international rules that govern them.   What roles are played by governments, individuals, firms, and others in shaping our knowledge world? How will the rules that we create—or unquestioningly accept—affect the contours of global    More >

Knowledge Power: Intellectual Property, Information, and Privacy

Gods, Guns, and Globalization: Religious Radicalism and International Political Economy

Mary Ann Tétreault and Robert A. Denemark, editors

Is it accurate to equate "fundamentalism" with antimodernism? What explains the growing importance of religious activists in world politics? Guns, Gods, and Globalization explores the multifaceted phenomenon of religious resurgence, ranging from the Christian right in the U.S. to ethnonationalist movements across North Africa and Asia. The authors' focus on the complex relationship    More >

Gods, Guns, and Globalization: Religious Radicalism and International Political Economy

Globalization and Inequality: Neoliberalism's Downward Spiral

John Rapley

Has the far-reaching experiment in creating a new world order along neoliberal lines succeeded? John Rapley answers with an emphatic no, contending that the rosy picture painted by neoliberal proponents of globalization was based on false assumptions. True, Rapley acknowledges, neoliberal reforms often have generated economic growth—but at a price. The resulting increase in inequality has    More >

Globalization and Inequality: Neoliberalism's Downward Spiral

Young Soldiers: Why They Choose To Fight

Rachel Brett and Irma Specht

They are part of rebel factions, national armies, paramilitaries, and other armed groups and entrenched in some of the most violent conflicts around the globe. They are in some ways still children?yet, from Afghanistan to Sierra Leone to Northern Ireland, you can find them among the fighters. Why? Young Soldiers explores the reasons that adolescents who are neither physically forced nor abducted    More >

Young Soldiers: Why They Choose To Fight

Inventing Public Diplomacy: The Story of the U.S. Information Agency

Wilson P. Dizard Jr.

Public diplomacy—the uncertain art of winning public support abroad for one's government and its foreign policies—constitutes a critical instrument of U.S. policy in the wake of the Bush administration's recent military interventions and its renunciation of widely accepted international accords. Wilson Dizard Jr. offers the first comprehensive account of public    More >

Inventing Public Diplomacy: The Story of the U.S. Information Agency

The Nation-State and Global Order: A Historical Introduction to Contemporary Politics, 2nd Edition

Walter C. Opello, Jr. and Stephen J. Rosow

This engaging introduction to contemporary politics examines the historical construction of the modern territorial state. Opello and Rosow fuse accounts of governing practices, technological change, political economy, language, and culture into a narrative of the formation of specific state forms. This revised edition reinforces their central argument that the current neoliberal state does not    More >

The Nation-State and Global Order: A Historical Introduction to Contemporary Politics, 2nd Edition

Security, Strategy and the Quest for Bloodless War

Robert Mandel

In recent decades, government and military officials alike have pushed increasingly in the direction of "bloodless wars," where confrontations are undertaken—and ultimately won—with minimum loss of human life. Robert Mandel provides the first comprehensive analysis of this trend.   After exploring the moral, legal, military, and political bases of the desire to    More >

Security, Strategy and the Quest for Bloodless War

Men, Militarism, and UN Peacekeeping: A Gendered Analysis

Sandra Whitworth

Sandra Whitworth looks behind the rhetoric to investigate from a feminist perspective some of the realities of military intervention under the UN flag.   Whitworth contends that there is a fundamental contradiction between portrayals of peacekeeping as altruistic and benign and the militarized masculinity that underpins the group identity of soldiers. Examining evidence from Cambodia and    More >

Men, Militarism, and UN Peacekeeping: A Gendered Analysis

Postconflict Development: Meeting New Challenges

Gerd Junne and Willemijn Verkoren, editors

With the proliferation of civil wars since the end of the Cold War, many developing countries now exist in a "postconflict" environment, posing enormous development challenges for the societies affected, as well as for international actors. Postconflict Development addresses these challenges in a range of vital sectors—security, justice, economic policy, education, the media,    More >

Postconflict Development: Meeting New Challenges

The Transnational Politics of U.S. Immigration Policy

Marc R. Rosenblum

The politics of immigration and migration control has taken on new urgency in the post-9/11 world as sovereignty concerns clash with industrialized democracies' continuing need for immigrants to fill jobs and sustain social security reserves.   Rosenblum analyzes U.S. immigration policy over the last 25 years, conceptualizing it as a two-stage, two-level game—thereby avoiding the    More >

The Transnational Politics of U.S. Immigration Policy

Nation-Building Unraveled? Aid, Peace, and Justice in Afghanistan

Antonio Donini, Norah Niland and Karin Wermester, editors

Using Afghanistan as an illustrative case, Nation-Building Unraveled? offers insiders’ perspectives on how emerging international practices are affecting the roles, policies, and impacts of UN agencies and international NGOs involved in peacebuilding efforts.    More >

Nation-Building Unraveled? Aid, Peace, and Justice in Afghanistan

War and Intervention: Issues for Contemporary Peace Operations

Michael V. Bhatia

War and Intervention explains how armed forces, aid agencies, and transitional adminsitrations in war-affected countries have adapted to the changing circumstances of modern war and conflict. It uses a broad range of cases to introduce the reader to the dynamics on the ground. Bhatia's analysis becomes all the more important at a time when the debate continues about the United States's    More >

War and Intervention: Issues for Contemporary Peace Operations

Worlds Apart: Civil Society and the Battle for Ethical Globalization

John D. Clark

In Worlds Apart, John Clark shows us how the same opportunities and threats that have caused such rapid change in the economic and corporate worlds are also transforming the citizen's sector.    More >

Worlds Apart: Civil Society and the Battle for Ethical Globalization

Confronting Globalization: Economic Integration and Popular Resistance in Mexico

Timothy A. Wise, Hilda Salazar and Laura Carlsen, editors

Is the current model for economic globalization good for the poor or the environment? Are there alternatives? Amid rising worldwide protests that corporate elites wield too much influence over global economic governance, this book on Mexico's experience under the North American Free Trade Agreement offers insights into both questions.    More >

Confronting Globalization: Economic Integration and Popular Resistance in Mexico

War Crimes: Confronting Atrocity in the Modern World

David Chuter

War crimes typically are discussed in sensational terms or in the dry language of international law. In contrast, David Chuter brings clarity to this complex subject, exploring why atrocities occur and what can be done to identify perpetrators and bring them to justice. Chuter confronts the real horror of the murder, rape, and torture that are subsumed under the dispassionate phrase "serious    More >

War Crimes: Confronting Atrocity in the Modern World

The Whistleblower of Dimona: Israel, Vanunu, and the Bomb

Yoel Cohen

In 1986, Mordechai Vanunu, a technician at Israel's highly secret nuclear arms research center at Dimona, disclosed highly classified details about Israel's nuclear arms program to the London Sunday Times. As a result, Vanunu was kidnapped from London and taken back to Israel where, after a closed- door trial, he was sentenced to eighteen years imprisonment for espionage and    More >

The Whistleblower of Dimona: Israel, Vanunu, and the Bomb

International Relations: From the Cold War to the Globalized World

Andreas Wenger and Doron Zimmermann

Tracing the evolution of international relations since the onset of the Cold War, the authors of this innovative textbook draw on recently available archival resources to vividly narrate world affairs from 1945 to the present. Events are addressed chronologically, with attention to both their motivations and their significance. The focus is on issues of security in the very broadest sense,    More >

International Relations: From the Cold War to the Globalized World

Ending Civil Wars: The Implementation of Peace Agreements

Stephen John Stedman, Donald Rothchild, and Elizabeth M. Cousens, editors

Why do some peace agreements successfully end civil wars, while others fail? What strategies are most effective in ensuring that warring parties comply with their treaty commitments? Of the various tasks involved in implementing peace agreements, which are the most important? These and related questions—life and death issues for millions of people today—are the subject of Ending Civil    More >

Ending Civil Wars: The Implementation of Peace Agreements

Rights of Passage: The Passport in International Relations

Mark B. Salter

From the fourteenth century to the twenty-first, the of the passport adds a vital perspective to the understanding of world politics. Rights of Passage explores shifting notions of sovereignty, citizenship, and identity, as well as changing concerns with issues of race, class, gender, and nation. Ranging from such topics as health, war, and migration to the current mood of vigilant surveillance,    More >

Rights of Passage: The Passport in International Relations

Unilateralism and U.S. Foreign Policy: International Perspectives

David M. Malone and Yuen Foong Khong, editors

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! From the war on terrorism to global warming, from national missile defense to unilateral sanctions, the U.S. has been taken to task for coming on too strong—or for doing too little. This important new book explores international reactions to U.S. conduct in world affairs Authors from around the world address the tensions between unilateralism and    More >

Unilateralism and U.S. Foreign Policy: International Perspectives

The Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh: On the Difficult Road to Peace

Amena Mohsin

  Ending a two-decade-long armed insurgency, the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) Peace Accord was signed in December 1997 by the government of Bangladesh and the PCJSS, the political representative of the Hill people. However, because of ambiguities within the accord and the failure to implement many of its crucial elements, the situation in the CHT today is far from peaceful. Amena Mohsin    More >

The Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh: On the Difficult Road to Peace

From Promise to Practice: Strengthening UN Capacities for the Prevention of Violent Conflict

Chandra Lekha Sriram and Karin Wermester, editors

How can the United Nations, regional and subregional organizations, government donors, and other policymakers best apply the tools of conflict prevention to the wide range of intrastate conflict situations actually found in the field? The detailed case studies and analytical chapters in From Promise to Practice offer operational lessons for fashioning strategy and tactics to meet the challenges of    More >

From Promise to Practice: Strengthening UN Capacities for the Prevention of Violent Conflict

Small States in World Politics: Explaining Foreign Policy Behavior

Jeanne A.K. Hey, editor

Have the changes of the past decade made this an easier or a more difficult world for small states as they pursue their foreign policy goals? To understand the foreign policies of small states, are new explanatory factors needed? Does the concept of the “small state” still have utility at all? Small States in World Politics addresses these questions, deftly analyzing the impact of new    More >

Small States in World Politics: Explaining Foreign Policy Behavior

The Foreign Policies of the Global South: Rethinking Conceptual Frameworks

Jacqueline Anne Braveboy-Wagner

Seeking to refocus thinking about the behavior of the global south ("third world") states in international affairs, this book explores contending explanations of global south foreign policy and strategy. The authors draw on both traditional approaches and newer conceptualizations in foreign policy analysis, contributing to the development of an integrated theoretical framework. Examples    More >

The Foreign Policies of the Global South: Rethinking Conceptual Frameworks

International Political Economy: State-Market Relations in a Changing Global Order, 2nd Edition

C. Roe Goddard, Patrick Cronin, and Kishore C. Dash, editors

Introducing the classic and contemporary ideologies of international political economy, this anthology has been carefully constructed for classroom use. Articles representing contending views of IPE are followed by selections on the international monetary system, development assistance, and international trade. With the student reader in mind, each piece is prefaced with an editors' note    More >

International Political Economy: State-Market Relations in a Changing Global Order, 2nd Edition

The Political Economy of Armed Conflict: Beyond Greed and Grievance

Karen Ballentine and Jake Sherman, editors

Globalization, suggest the authors of this collection, is creating new opportunities—some legal, some illicit—for armed factions to pursue their agendas in civil war. Within this context, they analyze the key dynamics of war economies and the challenges posed for conflict resolution and sustainable peace. Thematic chapters consider key issues in the political economy of internal wars,    More >

The Political Economy of Armed Conflict: Beyond Greed and Grievance

The United Nations and Regional Security: Europe and Beyond

Michael Pugh and Waheguru Pal Singh Sidhu, editors

Events in Europe over the past decade or so have created a dynamic requiring significant conceptual and practical adjustments on the part of the the United Nations and a range of regional actors, including the EU, NATO, and the OSCE. This volume explores the resulting collaborative relationships in the context of peace operations in the Balkans, considering past efforts and developing specific    More >

The United Nations and Regional Security: Europe and Beyond

Running Out of Control: Dilemmas of Globalization

R. Alan Hedley

Alan Hedley argues that, although for centuries technological innovation allowed humanity to gain increasing control over its fate, the trajectory of that control is now—due to globalization—on a downward course. Hedley also proposes approaches and strategies for dealing with the new reality.    More >

Running Out of Control: Dilemmas of Globalization

The Humanitarian Enterprise: Dilemmas and Discoveries

Larry Minear

With a particular (though not exclusive) focus on the complex links between humanitarian action and the worlds of politics and military engagement, Larry Minear explores what international actors—from the UN and national governments to the many private relief and development agencies—have learned about doing humanitarian work.    More >

The Humanitarian Enterprise: Dilemmas and Discoveries

Liberia's Civil War: Nigeria, ECOMOG, and Regional Security in West Africa

Adekeye Adebajo

Liberia's Civil War offers the most in-depth account available of one of the most baffling and intractable of Africa's conflicts. Adekeye Adebajo unravels the tangled web of the conflict by addressing four questions:  Why did Nigeria intervene in Liberia and remain committed throughout the seven-year civil war? To what extend was ECOMOG's intervention shaped by Nigeria's    More >

Liberia's Civil War: Nigeria, ECOMOG, and Regional Security in West Africa

Spectator-Sport War: The West and Contemporary Conflict

Colin McInnes

Following a century dominated by global conflict—and despite the unchanging nature of the human suffering it causes—the nature of war itself, argues Colin McInnes, has been transformed for the West. Spectator-Sport War considers the key developments that have led to this metamorphosis, ranging from new geopolitical relationships to new technological advances. McInnes shows that,    More >

Spectator-Sport War: The West and Contemporary Conflict

Transnational Organized Crime and International Security: Business as Usual?

Mats Berdal and Mónica Serrano, editors

Though the provision of illicit goods and services is far from being a new phenomenon, today's global economic environment has allowed transnational organized crime an unprecedented capacity to challenge states. The authors of this book examine the trends underlying the explosion of transnational organized crime and consider possible responses. Emphasizing the difficulties encountered by    More >

Transnational Organized Crime and International Security: Business as Usual?

The Sources of Military Change: Culture, Politics, Technology

Theo Farrell and Terry Terriff, editors

In varying circumstances, military organizations around the world are undergoing major restructuring. This book explores why, and how, militaries change. The authors focus on a complex of three influencing factors—cultural norms, politics, and new technology—offering a historical perspective of more than a century. Their analyses range from developing states to Russia, Britain, the    More >

The Sources of Military Change: Culture, Politics, Technology

Transnational Crime and Public Security: Challenges to Mexico and the United States

John Bailey and Jorge Chabat, editors

Issues of public security—crime, violence, corruption, and defective law enforcement—all play important roles in the Mexico-U.S. bilateral relationship. The roots of these problems run deep into institutions and practices that have survived the old order. The contributors to this volume shed new light on the determinants of transnational crime and its consequences for domestic politics    More >

Transnational Crime and Public Security: Challenges to Mexico and the United States

NAFTA in the New Millennium

Edward J. Chambers and Peter H. Smith, editors

In the eight years since NAFTA's implementation, leaders and citizens in member countries have gained a sense of what the agreement is and is not, what it can and cannot do. NAFTA has resolved some problems but revealed (or created) others. Contributors to this volume examine NAFTA's performance and impact, the degree of support it enjoys in the member countries, prospects for short- and    More >

NAFTA in the New Millennium

From Reaction to Conflict Prevention: Opportunities for the UN System

Fen Osler Hampson and David M. Malone

Though the prevention of conflict is the first promise in the Charter of the United Nations, it is a promise constantly betrayed by international organizations, governments, and local actors alike. At the same time, and in a more positive vein, recent studies provide much-needed information about why and how today's conflicts start and what sustains them. This ground-breaking book presents    More >

From Reaction to Conflict Prevention: Opportunities for the UN System

Canada, the United States, and Cuba: An Evolving Relationship

Sahadeo Basdeo and Heather N. Nicol, editors

This engaging book explores one of the most important hemispheric issues of the day—the evolving relations between Cuba and its North American neighbors. The authors identify the commonalities and differences in contemporary international relations between Cuba and the United States and Cuba and Canada, discuss the differing approaches toward the Cuban Revolution and Fidel Castro, and    More >

Canada, the United States, and Cuba: An Evolving Relationship

Strategic Thinking: An Introduction and Farewell

Philip Windsor, edited by Mats Berdal and Spyros Economides

In this, his final book, Philip Windsor explores the emergence, meaning, and significance of the Cold War mentality. Tracing the evolution of strategic thinking from its origins in medieval Europe to the demise of the Cold War, he considers the peculiar character and autonomy that strategy acquired in the nuclear age. Windsor is concerned with changes in our understanding of war and    More >

Strategic Thinking: An Introduction and Farewell

Searching for Peace in Europe and Eurasia: An Overview of Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding Activities

Paul van Tongeren, Hans van de Veen, and Juliette Verhoeven, editors

Searching for Peace in Europe and Eurasia offers much-needed insight into the possibilities for effective conflict prevention and peacebuilding throughout the region. Presenting surveys of the violent conflicts in Europe, the Caucasus, and Central Asia, the contributors offer a unique combination of background information, detailed descriptions of ongoing activities, and assessments of future    More >

Searching for Peace in Europe and Eurasia: An Overview of Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding Activities

Democracy and War: The End of an Illusion?

Errol A. Henderson

Errol Henderson critically examines what has been called the closest thing to an empirical law in world politics, the concept of the democratic peace.   Henderson tests two versions of the democratic peace proposition (DPP)—that democracies rarely if ever fight one another, and that democracies are more peaceful in general than nondemocracies—using exactly the same data and    More >

Democracy and War: The End of an Illusion?

Exporting Democracy: Rhetoric vs. Reality

Peter Schraeder, editor

In recent years, debates within academic and policymaking circles have gradually shifted—from a Cold War focus on whether democracy constitutes the best form of governance, to the question of whether (and to what degree) international actors should be actively involved in democracy promotion. This book offers the first comprehensive analysis of international efforts to promote democracy    More >

Exporting Democracy: Rhetoric vs. Reality

Reluctant Europeans: Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland in the Process of Integration

Sieglinde Gstöhl

Analyzing some thirty policy decisions across three countries and five decades, Sieglinde Gstöhl considers why some countries continue to be "reluctant Europeans."   Typically, small and highly industrialized states are expected to be more likely to integrate than are larger or less advanced countries. Why, then, did Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland choose for so long not to    More >

Sanctions and the Search for Security: Challenges to UN Action

David Cortright and George A. Lopez, with Linda Gerber

Following on the publication of The Sanctions Decade—lauded as the definitive history and accounting of United Nations sanctions in the 1990s—David Cortright and George Lopez continue their collaboration to examine the changing context and meaning of sanctions and the security dilemmas that the Security Council now faces. Cortright and Lopez note that, despite widespread disagreement    More >

Sanctions and the Search for Security: Challenges to UN Action

Islam, the Middle East, and the New Global Hegemony

Simon W. Murden

Simon Murden investigates how Muslim societies in the Middle East are being affected by globalized politics and economics, and how they are adapting to it.   Murden describes how a Western-designed set of economic and political norms, institutions, and regimes has come to be a hegemonic system. His focus is on the encounter between the Islamic vision of society, with its emphasis on    More >

Islam, the Middle East, and the New Global Hegemony

Ecuador vs. Peru: Peacemaking Amid Rivalry

Monica Herz and João Pontes Nogueira

Although the 1995 Cenepa war between Ecuador and Peru was the first military conflict in South America in more than five decades, the Ecuador-Peru relationship might be characterized as one of enduring rivalry—punctuated by the threat of armed combat. In the context of this history of recurrent crises, Herz and Nogueira analyze the mediation process that followed the 1995 war.   The    More >

Ecuador vs. Peru: Peacemaking Amid Rivalry

Armies Without States: The Privatization of Security

Robert Mandel

What does the increasing use of private security forces mean for governments? For individuals? Armies Without States offers a comprehensive analysis of the varieties, causes, and consequences of this growing phenomenon.   Ranging from the international to the subnational level and from the use of mercenaries by private parties to the government outsourcing of military operations, Mandel    More >

International Environmental Politics: The Limits of Green Diplomacy

Lee-Anne Broadhead

Introducing students to global environmental politics from a critical perspective, Lee-Anne Broadhead reveals the yawning gap between the rhetoric of international agreements and the reality of meaningful results.   Broadhead effectively integrates concepts from international political economy and international environmental politics to demonstrate that the regimes established to manage the    More >

International Environmental Politics: The Limits of Green Diplomacy

The United Nations System: Toward International Justice

Nigel D. White

To what extent does the United Nations system work? This comprehensive survey of the world's most important family of international organizations examines the UN's structure and powers—and considers whether it is achieving what it set out to do. Focusing on legal rather than political issues, White first examines the UN's objectives, not only as defined in the original charter    More >

The United Nations System: Toward International Justice

Partnership for International Development: Rhetoric or Results?

Jennifer M. Brinkerhoff

In the search for institutional models that can deliver more and better development outcomes, partnership is arguably among the most popular solutions proposed. But the evidence of partnerships' contributions to actual performance has been for the most part anecdotal. Partnership for International Development bridges the gap between rhetoric and practice, clarifying what the concept    More >

Partnership for International Development: Rhetoric or Results?

Waging War Without Warriors? The Changing Culture of Military Conflict

Christopher Coker

In the past, posits Christopher Coker, wars were all-encompassing; they were a test not only of individual bravery, but of an entire community's will to survive. In the West today, in contrast, wars are tools of foreign policy, not intrinsic to the values of a society—they are instrumental rather than existential. The clash between these two "cultures of war" can be seen    More >

Waging War Without Warriors? The Changing Culture of Military Conflict

Toward Normalizing U.S.-Korea Relations: In Due Course?

Edward A. Olsen

Considering the future of U.S.-Korea relations, Edward Olsen first provides a rich assessment of the political, economic, and strategic factors that have shaped—and flawed—U.S. policy toward the Korean peninsula since WWII.   Olsen suggests that the prospect of permanent separation has become integral to U.S. policy toward both Korean states. Offering counterintuitive    More >

Toward Normalizing U.S.-Korea Relations: In Due Course?

Arms Control: Cooperative Security in a Changing Environment

Jeffrey A. Larsen, editor

More than a decade after the end of the Cold War, the need to control the spread of arms remains clear, while the usefulness of traditional paradigms is increasingly called into question. The authors of Arms Control thoroughly review this complex topic, exploring differing approaches to arms control, successes and failures thus far, and the likelihood of future agreements. Ranging from the U.S.    More >

Arms Control: Cooperative Security in a Changing Environment

Conflict Prevention: The Untapped Potential of the Business Sector

Andreas Wenger and Daniel Möckli

Despite intensive international efforts in the area of conflict prevention, there is still little agreement about how civil wars might best be averted. And, as the news regularly reminds us, the many attempts at preventive action have not been strikingly successful. The authors of Conflict Prevention offer a new perspective, arguing that such efforts could be much more effective if they    More >

Conflict Prevention: The Untapped Potential of the Business Sector

Peacekeeping in East Timor: The Path to Independence

Michael G. Smith (with Moreen Dee), with forewords by Sergio Vieira de Mello and Kay Rala Xanana Gusmao

The UN intervention in East Timor amply illustrates the type of complex operation that the United Nations increasingly is being asked to undertake. Michael Smith analyzes the successes and failures of the UN Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET), which was designed to work in partnership with the East Timorese in guiding the country to independence following the 1999 vote to secede    More >

Peacekeeping in East Timor: The Path to Independence

International Politics and State Strength

Thomas J. Volgy and Alison Bailin

Although it has been more than a decade since the Cold War global structure collapsed, neither scholars nor policymakers have clearly identified its replacement. What is the new world order, ask Thomas Volgy and Alison Bailin; and in the midst of declining state strength, who sustains it? They find their answers in the system collectively constructed by the major powers. The authors consider both    More >

International Politics and State Strength

Inventing North America: Canada, Mexico, and the United States

Guy Poitras

In the face of potent domestic and global forces, the U.S., Canada, and Mexico—the NA-3—have devised an enterprise that promises to draw them closer together in the twenty-first century. Inventing North America is an attempt to understand the NA-3's unique brand of regionalism within an increasingly globalized world. Poitras dissects the commonalities and differences among the    More >

Inventing North America: Canada, Mexico, and the United States

Capitalism and Justice: Envisioning Social and Economic Fairness

John Isbister

In Capitalism and Justice, John Isbister takes a practical approach to some of the most important questions of economic and social justice in the context of the global economy: How big a spread of incomes from rich to poor, for example, is consistent with social justice? Should inheritances be abolished? What sort of commitment should a rich country like the United States make to foreign aid?    More >

Capitalism and Justice: Envisioning Social and Economic Fairness

Europe's New Security Challenges

Heinz Gärtner, Adrian Hyde-Price, and Erich Reiter, editors

A central point of controversy among both academics and policymakers is the nature and significance of security in the post–Cold War world. Engaging that discussion, this original collection explores the new security challenges facing Europe. The authors assess the relevance and usefulness of various actors and various approaches for tackling those security challenges. Seeking to avoid    More >

Europe's New Security Challenges

Democracy, Liberalism, and War: Rethinking the Democratic Peace Debates

Tarak Barkawi and Mark Laffey, editors

The connection between liberalism and peace—and the reason why democratic countries appear not to go to war with each other—has become a dominant theme in international relations research. This book argues that scholars need to move beyond the "democratic peace debate" to ask more searching questions about the relationship of democracy, liberalism, and war. The authors focus    More >

Toward Peace in Bosnia: Implementing the Dayton Accords

Elizabeth M. Cousens and Charles K. Cater

When the Dayton peace agreement was signed in 1995, there were expectations among the signatories, the Bosnian population, and the international community alike that the pact would not only end conflict among Bosnia's three armies, but also establish a political and social foundation for more robust peace. Recognizing that the latter goal—incorporating political reform and    More >

Toward Peace in Bosnia: Implementing the Dayton Accords

Enlarging NATO: The National Debates

Gale A. Mattox and Arthur R. Rachwald, editors

Thoroughly examining the deliberations over nato enlargement in twelve countries—five current members of the alliance; three invited to join in the first round of enlargement; two seeking membership; and Russia and Ukraine, both involved with nato, but unlikely to join—the authors shed light on the political motives leading to each country's position. Their comparative analysis    More >

Global Citizen Action

Michael Edwards and John Gaventa, editors

Less than ten years ago, there was little talk of civil society in the corridors of power. But now, the walls reverberate to the sound of global citizen action—and difficult questions about the phenomenon abound. This book presents the cutting edge of contemporary thinking about nonstate participation in the international system. Against the background of the changing global context, the    More >

Global Citizen Action

Contending Liberalisms in World Politics: Ideology and Power

James L. Richardson

This wide-ranging critique of current endeavors to construct a world order based on neoliberal ideology comes not from a standpoint opposed to liberalism, but from within liberalism itself. After introducing the theme of contending liberalisms, Richardson traces the emergence over time of a distinctive liberal view of international relations and reviews the present state of liberal IR theory. He    More >

Contending Liberalisms in World Politics: Ideology and Power

Governing the Internet: The Emergence of an International Regime

Marcus Franda

Governing the Internet explores the many complex issues and challenges that confront governments, technocrats, business people, and others as they try to create and implement rules for a truly global, interoperable Internet. Though focusing on those countries that have the most advanced information technology infrastructures, Franda also discusses the development of the Internet in China as a    More >

Governing the Internet: The Emergence of an International Regime

Women and Civil War: Impact, Organization, and Action

Krishna Kumar, editor

Women typically do not remain passive spectators during a war, nor are they always its innocent victims; instead, they frequently take on new roles and responsibilities, participating in military and political struggles and building new networks in order to obtain needed resources for their families. Consequently, while civil war imposes tremendous burdens on women, it often contributes to the    More >

Women and Civil War: Impact, Organization, and Action

The International Migration of the Highly Skilled: Demand, Supply, and Development Consequences in Sending and Receiving Countries

Wayne Cornelius, Thomas Espenshade, and Idean Salehyan, editors

The demand for skilled labor is rising dramatically worldwide to meet the needs of a global economy driven by high-technology goods and services. Advanced industrial societies—the United States, Japan, the countries of Western Europe—are becoming more dependent on foreign scientists, engineers, and computer programmers to propel their economic growth. And emerging economies—such    More >

The International Migration of the Highly Skilled: Demand, Supply, and Development Consequences in Sending and Receiving Countries

Multilateralism and U.S. Foreign Policy: Ambivalent Engagement

Stewart Patrick and Shepard Forman, editors

When should the United States cooperate with others in confronting global problems? Why is the U.S. often ambivalent about multilateral cooperation? What are the costs of acting alone? These are some of the timely questions addressed in this examination of the role of multilateralism in U.S. foreign policy. The authors isolate a number of factors that help to explain U.S. reluctance to commit to    More >

Multilateralism and U.S. Foreign Policy: Ambivalent Engagement

Kosovo: An Unfinished Peace

William G. O'Neill

Despite the deployment of NATO forces in Kosovo and the UN's direct involvement in governing the province, such terrors as murder, disappearances, bombings, and arson have become routine occurrences. William O'Neill analyzes the nature of the violence that continues to plague Kosovo's residents and assesses efforts to guarantee public security. O'Neill considers how the particular    More >

Kosovo: An Unfinished Peace

Bound: Living in the Globalized World

Scott Sernau

In his accessible, straightforward introduction to one of the key issues of our time, Scott Sernau explores the trends and practices have brought us to this new global century and then relates world issues to our everyday local experiences.    More >

Bound: Living in the Globalized World

War's Offensive on Women: The Humanitarian Challenge in Bosnia, Kosovo, and Afghanistan

Julie A. Mertus

Julie Mertus explores, with cautious optimism, the progress that has been made in incorporating women and responding to gender issues in the process of dealing with humanitarian crises.    More >

War's Offensive on Women: The Humanitarian Challenge in Bosnia, Kosovo, and Afghanistan

The Post-Corporate World: Life After Capitalism

David C. Korten

One of Future Survey's Super 70 books David Korten challenges capitalism's claim to being a means of creating wealth and a champion of democracy as he examines the fissure between the promises of the new global capitalism and the realities of financial insecurity, inequality, social breakdown, and environmental destruction. Rejecting the inevitability of our current trajectory, he    More >

The Post-Corporate World: Life After Capitalism

Globalization on Trial: The Human Condition and the Information Civilization

Farhang Rajaee

Farhang Rajaee provides a fresh and critical inquiry into the nature of globalization. Rajaee's staring point is the combination of the fall of the bipolar world system, the advent of the information revolution, and the emergence of postmodern thinking that has ushered in a new epoch. What opportunities, he asks, must we seize? What dangers must we overcome? Addressing these questions, and    More >

Globalization on Trial: The Human Condition and the Information Civilization

Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars

Mats Berdal and David M. Malone, editors

Current scholarship on civil wars and transitions from war to peace has made significant progress in understanding the political dimensions of internal conflict, but the economic motivations spurring political violence have been comparatively neglected. This pathbreaking volume identifies the economic and social factors underlying the perpetuation of civil wars, exploring as well the economic    More >

Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars

The Sanctions Decade: Assessing UN Strategies in the 1990s

David Cortright and George A. Lopez

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! Since the end of the Cold War, economic sanctions have been a frequent instrument of United Nations authority, imposed by the Security Council against nearly a dozen targets. Some efforts appear to have been successful, others are more doubtful—all, though, have been controversial. This book, based on more than two hundred interviews with officials from    More >

Inevitable Partnership: Understanding Mexico-U.S. Relations

Clint E. Smith

This concise, accessible volume astutely describes the complex Mexico-U.S. relationship from the beginning of the nineteenth century through the end of the twentieth. Smith begins with a brief history of early U.S.-Mexico relations, focusing on the Texas Secession, the Mexican War, and the Gadsden Purchase. By 1853, one-half of what used to be Mexico had become one-third of what is now the United    More >

Inevitable Partnership: Understanding Mexico-U.S. Relations

Peacebuilding: A Field Guide

Luc Reychler and Thania Paffenholz, editors

A milestone in the search for sustainable peace, this handbook highlights the invaluable contributions of people working in the field. The authors clarify how fieldworkers "fit" in the overall peacebuilding process; provide details of the most effective practices; and offer guidelines for preparing for the field. Part 1 of the book introduces concepts and tools for sustainable    More >

Peacebuilding: A Field Guide

Peacebuilding as Politics: Cultivating Peace in Fragile Societies

Elizabeth M. Cousens and Chetan Kumar,editors, with Karin Wermester

Although the idea of postconflict peacebuilding appeared to hold great promise after the end of the Cold War, within a very few years the opportunities for peacebuilding seemed to pale beside the obstacles to it. This volume examines the successes and failures of large-scale interventions to build peace in El Salvador, Cambodia, Haiti, Somalia, and Bosnia and Herzegovina. The authors shed light    More >

Peacebuilding as Politics: Cultivating Peace in Fragile Societies

Critical Theory and World Politics

Richard Wyn Jones, editor

This book represents the first attempt to bring together the leading critical theorists of world politics to discuss both the promise and the pitfalls of their work. The authors range broadly across the terrain of world politics, engaging with both theory and emancipatory practice. Critiques by two scholars from other IR traditions are also included. The result is a seminal statement of the    More >

Critical Theory and World Politics

European Monetary Integration and Domestic Politics: Britain, France, and Italy

James I. Walsh

This book explains why three countries—Britain, France, and Italy—that have faced similar problems of high inflation and currency depreciation since the 1970s—Britain, France, and Italy—have pursued very different international monetary strategies. Walsh argues that international monetary policies produce predictable sets of winners and losers, and that policy choice is a    More >

Good Intentions: Pledges of Aid for Postconflict Recovery

Shepard Forman and Stewart Patrick, editors

This comparative study assesses the causes—and consequences—of failures to fulfill pledges of aid to postconflict societies. In each of six case studies, the coauthors (drawn from both donor states and recipient countries), evaluate multilateral efforts to support sustainable recovery and peacebuilding in societies emerging from protracted violence. They first establish the timing,    More >

An Unconventional Brotherhood: Union Support for Liberalized Immigration in Europe

Julie R. Watts

Julie Watts's research has turned conventional wisdom—that organized labor opposes immigration for fear that foreign workers will undercut the wages and working conditions of native workers—on its head. Her examination of labor unions in Italy, Spain, and France reveals that labor leaders actually prefer more open immigration policies. In an era of globalization, restrictive    More >

Workers Without Frontiers: The Impact of Globalization on International Migration

Peter Stalker

This unique assessment of a complex and contentious issue brings together the latest information on international migration in the context of a global economy. Redressing a gap in most discussions of globalization, Stalker examines how migration interacts with movements of goods and capital, and how it is closely tied to social and economic changes. He makes starkly clear the major impact that    More >

Beyond Globalization: Shaping a Sustainable Global Economy

Hazel Henderson

Renowned economist and commentator Hazel Henderson’s critique of globalization sets out a panoramic vision of the changes required to reshape the global economy in the interests of social justice and sustainability.    More >

Beyond Globalization: Shaping a Sustainable Global Economy

The Weapons State: Proliferation and the Framing of Security

David Mutimer

The proliferation of all kinds of weapons (nuclear, chemical, biological, and even conventional) is emerging as a focal point for international security. This book shows how both the language used to talk about weapons proliferation and the practices adopted to respond to it serve to define the problem in ways that promote policy responses doomed to failure. Examining the metaphors that have been    More >

The Weapons State: Proliferation and the Framing of Security

Navigating Modernity: Postcolonialism, Identity, and International Relations

Albert J. Paolini, edited by Anthony Elliott and Anthony Moran

Placing the debate squarely within the discipline of international relations, Albert Paolini assesses the key personal and political dimensions of postcolonialism—one of the major political and cultural issues of the current era. Paolini is concerned with the connections among postcolonialism, globalization, and modernity, and he offers one of the first detailed statements of those    More >

Do No Harm: How Aid Can Support Peace—or War

Mary B. Anderson

Echoing the words of the Hippocratic Oath, the author of Do No Harm challenges aid agency staff to take responsibility for the ways that their assistance affects conflicts. Anderson cites the experiences of many aid providers in wartorn societies to show that international assistance—even when it is effective in saving lives, alleviating suffering, and furthering sustainable    More >

Do No Harm:  How Aid Can Support Peace—or War

After the Peace: Resistance and Reconciliation

Robert L. Rothstein, editor

The fragile peace agreements that have in the post–Cold War years sought to resolve protracted conflicts fall well short of being genuine, stable settlements. This volume is concerned with how those agreements might be strengthened and, especially, how best to conceptualize the period after a tentative peace has been negotiated. Six case studies explore three major conflicts from differing    More >

Mercosur: Regional Integration, World Markets

Riordan Roett, editor

This timely volume describes the origins of Mercosur, South America’s dynamic and successful regional integration project, as well as the issues still to be tackled regarding the trade bloc’s expansion, the challenges to its transition from a customs union to the “Common Market of the South,” and its relations with other trade groups and countries (particularly the European    More >

Racing to Regionalize: Democracy, Capitalism, and Regional Political Economy

Kenneth P. Thomas and Mary Ann Tétreault, editors

The intensifying proliferation of regional organizations over the last decade is explored in this volume, which focuses on the workings of APEC, the European Union, the Gulf Co-operation Council, Mercosur, and NAFTA. The authors examine a number of critical issues: How does politics shape the construction of regional agreements? To what extent do these agreements incorporate or limit economic    More >

Civil Society and the Summit of the Americas: The 1998 Santiago Summit

Richard Feinberg and Robin Rosenberg, editors

The Summit of the Americas process, which began at the Miami Summit in 1994, has created unprecedented opportunities for the involvement of civil society actors in decisionmaking and the implementation of important initiatives in the social, economic, and political life of the Western Hemisphere. This volume documents the wide-ranging involvement of non-governmental and other sectors in the Summit    More >

Globalization, Human Security, and the African Experience

Caroline Thomas and Peter Wilkin, editors

The globalization of world politics affects issues rarely considered in traditional security studies. This book explores the interrelationships of those issues in critical security terms, drawing on the African experience. The authors provide a mixture of theory and case studies distinguished by thorough cross-referencing. The introduction to the book establishes the context of the security    More >

Poststructuralism and International Relations: Bringing the Political Back In

Jenny Edkins

Offering a sophisticated introduction to the major post­structuralist thinkers, this book shows how Fou­cault, Derrida, Lacan, and Žižek expose the depoliticization found in conventional international relations theory. Edkins argues that, contrary to the opinions of their detractors, the poststructuralists are concerned with the big questions of international politics: it is precisely    More >

Security, Strategy, and Critical Theory

Richard Wyn Jones

Laying out the conceptual foundations of critical security studies, Richard Wyn Jones uses the ideas of the Frankfurt School to advance critical thought about security, strategy, and the relationship between the theory and practice of security. Wyn Jones provides a sophisticated yet accessible overview of the ideas of the Frankfurt School's main thinkers—Horkheimer, Adorno, Habermas,    More >

The Second Nuclear Age

Colin S. Gray

Colin Gray returns nuclear weapons to the center stage of international politics. Taking issue with the complacent belief that a happy mixture of deterrence, arms control, and luck will enable humanity to cope adequately with weapons of mass destruction (WMD), Gray argues that the risk posed by WMD is ever more serious. Policy that ignores the present nuclear age, he cautions, is policy that    More >

U.S. Politics and the Global Economy: Corporate Power, Conservative Shift

Ronald W. Cox and Daniel Skidmore-Hess

This thoughtful, highly original book investigates the influence of globalization on ideology and politics in the United States. Cox and Skidmore-Hess argue that U.S. policy increasingly has been motivated less by anxiety about the independence and stability of the domestic economy and more by worry about factors that might limit the participation of U.S. corporations in international markets.    More >

Women, Culture, and International Relations

Vivienne Jabri and Eleanor O'Gorman, editors

This book expands the agenda of feminist IR by considering the heterogeneity of women’s voices in the realm of world politics, as well as the challenges that this diversity poses. The authors develop a theoretical discourse that incorporates the combined notions of difference and emancipation in a discussion of the agency of women and their transformative capacity. They use a normative    More >

Biological Warfare: Modern Offense and Defense

Raymond A. Zilinskas, editor

Recent revelations about Iraqi and Soviet/Russian biological weapons programs and highly publicized events such as the deployment of anthrax and botulinum by the Aum Shinrikyo sect in Japan have made clear the necessity for addressing the issues of biological warfare and defense. In a comprehensive analysis of this imminent threat to global security, fourteen internationally recognized authorities    More >

Biological Warfare: Modern Offense and Defense

The Americas in Transition: The Contours of Regionalism

Gordon Mace, Louis Bélanger, and contributors

The FTA, MERCOSUR, the Enterprise for the Americas Initiative, NAFTA, the Summit of the Americas—do these constitute building blocs in the construction of a new regional system? This book explores that question, offering an assessment of the state of regionalism in the Americas. The authors first outline the regionalist project—which they view as essentially a U.S.    More >

Aiding Violence: The Development Enterprise in Rwanda

Peter Uvin

Winner of the African Studies Association’s Herskovits Award! Aiding Violence expresses outrage at the contradiction of genocide in a country considered at the time by Western aid agencies to be a model of development. Peter Uvin reveals how aid enterprises reacted—or failed to react—to the 1990s dynamics of militarization and polarization in Rwanda that resulted in mass    More >

Aiding Violence: The Development Enterprise in Rwanda

The Economic Life of Refugees

Karen Jacobsen

What happens to refugees, the victims of forced migration, once the first rush of media attention and aid has passed and they must rebuild their lives essentially on their own? Karen Jacobsen explores the economic survival strategies of refugees, and the obstacles that they face, as they live in a protracted state of displacement. She also proposes alternative approaches for humanitarian agencies    More >

The Economic Life of Refugees

Players and Issues in International Aid

Paula Hoy

Paula Hoy provides a one-stop source of vital information on the politics, players, and issues surrounding international development assistance.    More >

Players and Issues in International Aid

Property and the Making of the International System

Kurt Burch

This original work considers the emergence of the modern international system—that is, the global social context framing the diverse behaviors called international relations—in terms of the concepts of property and property rights. Burch argues that the development of "property" is a crucial aspect of contemporary claims about the modern state, sovereignty, international    More >

The Arms Dynamic in World Politics

Barry Buzan and Eric Herring

What is the relationship between the arms dynamic and world politics? How has that relationship changed? Considering the entire set of factors that influence the nature of armed forces, this comprehensive book puts these essential questions into historical and analytical perspective. Buzan and Herring focus on four themes. In Part 1 they discuss the ways in which the political and military    More >

The Politics of Peace-Maintenance

Jarat Chopra, editor

The results of more than fifty years of peacekeeping operations—ranging from diplomatic efforts to so-called peace enforcement (the use of military force)—have made it clear that a new international political capability is required to adequately manage internal conflicts. That capability, peace- maintenance, is introduced and explored in this seminal work. Varying in degree of    More >

International Relations on Film

Robert W. Gregg

This welcome exploration of the ways in which feature films depict the various aspects of international relations considers the utility of the feature film as a vehicle to dramatize issues and events, challenge conventional wisdom, rouse an audience to anger, and even revise history. Gregg makes a strong case for the value of films as a window on the real world of international relations.    More >

Myths, Models, and U.S. Foreign Policy: The Cultural Shaping of Three Cold Warriors

Stephen W. Twing

In what ways does national culture influence the direction of U.S. foreign policy? What are the mechanisms through which culture shapes policy outcomes? Stephen Twing’s thoughtful analysis illustrates precisely how certain cultural elements influenced the policy preferences and policymaking behaviors of three Cold War-era statesmen, John Foster Dulles, Averell Harriman, and Robert    More >

Multiple Realities of International Mediation

Marieke Kleiboer

Recent experiences have demonstrated once again the complexities of brokering an end to deep-rooted ethnic and international conflicts, as well as the difficulties of evaluating the outcomes of third- party interventions. Addressing these issues, this book offers a sophisticated approach to assessing mediation efforts and to reconstructing and interpreting mediation processes. Kleiboer develops    More >

Postconflict Elections, Democratization, and International Assistance

Krishna Kumar, editor

On the Humanitarian Times list of the Top Ten Books of 1998! With the resolution of intrastate conflicts in Africa, Central America, and Southeast Asia, and with new hope for the peaceful settlement of many still-existing conflicts, attention is turning to the issue of “free and fair” elections. This book examines the nature of postconflict (transition) elections, as well as the role    More >

Postconflict Elections, Democratization, and International Assistance

Politics of Illusion: The Bay of Pigs Invasion Reexamined

James G. Blight and Peter Kornbluh, editors

The defeat of the attempted April 1961 invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs (Playa Giron) was one of the worst foreign–policy disasters in U.S. history. Since then, explanations of the event have emphasized betrayal by one U.S. agency or another, seeking to assign blame for the "loss" of Cuba. With the benefit of new documentation, however—from U.S. government and Cuban exile    More >

Constituting International Political Economy

Kurt Burch and Robert A. Denemark, editors

International political economy is both a discipline and a set of global practices and conditions. This volume explores how the two are related, illustrating the changing character of the global political economy, as well as changing perspectives on that character. The authors first consider how social issues, policy concerns, and philosophical judgments help constitute IPE both as a worldview    More >

Security: A New Framework for Analysis

Barry Buzan, Ole Wæver, and Jaap de Wilde

Traditionalists in the field of security studies tend to restrict the subject to politico–military issues; while wideners want to extend it to the economic, societal, and environmental sectors. This book sets out a comprehensive statement of the new security studies, establishing the case for the broader agenda. The authors argue that security is a particular type of politics applicable to    More >

Security: A New Framework for Analysis

Decisionmaking on War and Peace: The Cognitive-Rational Debate

Nehemia Geva and Alex Mintz, editors

Reviewing, comparing, and contrasting major models of foreign policy decisionmaking, contributors to this volume make a substantial contribution to the debate between cognitive and rational theories of decisionmaking. The authors describe the leading cognitive and rational models and introduce alternative models of foreign policy choice (prospect theory, poliheuristic theory, theory of moves, and    More >

Rebuilding Societies After Civil War: Critical Roles for International Assistance

Krishna Kumar, editor

With civil wars and internal violence on the rise over the past two decades, bilateral donor agencies, intergovernmental organizations, and NGOs have been playing an increasingly critical role in rehabilitation efforts once an acute conflict is over. In this process, it has become clear that the traditional aid focus on the economic sector, though essential, is not sufficient; the political and    More >

Rebuilding Societies After Civil War: Critical Roles for International Assistance

Global Perspectives: International Relations, U.S. Foreign Policy, and the View from Abroad

David Lai, editor

This innovative text/reader illustrates a range of national and regional perspectives on international relations and U.S. foreign policy. The twenty-eight selections include speeches, essays, and book excerpts, offering opinion and analysis by leading politicians, journalists, and scholars from around the globe. Divided into two parts, the book begins with a survey of contrasting views about the    More >

Multi-Track Diplomacy: A Systems Approach to Peace, 3rd edition

Louise Diamond and John McDonald

Exceptional in its systemic approach to peacemaking and conflict resolution, Multi-Track Diplomacy identifies the actors and activities that contribute to peacemaking and peacebuilding processes. The authors show how each of nine tracks is interlinked with all the others, providing new ideas, fresh perspectives, and an extensive guide to further resources.    More >

Multi-Track Diplomacy: A Systems Approach to Peace, 3rd edition

The News Media, Civil War, and Humanitarian Action

Larry Minear, Colin Scott, and Thomas G. Weiss

The civil wars that have been prominent features of the first post–Cold War decade have revealed a close and active relationship among the news media, governments, and humanitarian organizations. Beyond loose talk of the "CNN factor," however, analysis of this linkage and attention to its implications have been lacking. This brief volume looks at institutional interactions between    More >

Globalization: Critical Reflections

James H. Mittelman, editor

This book analyzes the empirical trends constituting the globalization process in the late twentieth century and explains its underlying causes and consequences. The authors explore the globalization of production, challenges to the state system represented by the contradictory pressures of sub- and supranationalism, and linkages between regionalism and globalizing tendencies. They also consider    More >

Strategy and Security in U.S.-Mexican Relations Beyond the Cold War

John Bailey and Sergio Aguayo, editors

Drug trafficking, transnational organized crime, terrorism, regional conflicts, failed states, controlled flows of refugees, and the rise of regional economic blocs have led Mexico and the United States to reconsider their strategic and security interests. The contributors examine possible sources of future bilateral conflicts and the appropriateness of bilateral/multilateral resoultion of    More >

Distant Cousins: The Caribbean-Latin American Relationship

Anthony T. Bryan and Andrés Serbin, editors

Profound cultural and political differences exist between Latin America and the Caribbean, despite their geographical proximity. Recent transformations in the global politico-economic system have brought about closer cooperation between the two areas, and this volume provides useful insights into their changing relationship. Contributors represent diverse academic backgrounds and provide a    More >

NGOs, the UN, and Global Governance

Thomas G. Weiss and Leon Gordenker, editors

A comprehensive exploration of the role of nongovernmental organizations in the international arena, this collection examines the full range of NGO relationships and actions. The authors first outline the aims and scope of NGOs and suggest a systematic way of thinking about their activities. These conceptual notions underlie Part 2 of the book, five case studies focusing on NGOs vis-a-vis    More >

Foreign Aid Toward the Millennium

Steven W. Hook, editor

Like world politics itself, the foreign-assistance regime of the late 1990s is characterized by fundamental change and widespread uncertainty. This book confronts these changes and considers, cross-nationally, how donor and recipient states are adapting their aid relationships to the transformed geopolitical environment. Combining the expertise of both area specialists and those focusing on    More >

Foreign Policy and Regionalism in the Americas

Gordon Mace and Jean-Philippe Thérien, editors

This comparative analysis of foreign policy behavior in the Americas focuses on the emerging trend toward regionalism. Following a discussion of the phenomenon of regionalism in general, chapters on the countries of North America, the Caribbean, and South America address three questions fundamental to the relationship between national foreign policy and hemispheric cooperation and integration:    More >

The Third World Security Predicament: State Making, Regional Conflict, and the International System

Mohammed Ayoob

This book explores the multifaceted security problems facing the Third World in the aftermath of the Cold War. Ayoob proposes that the major underlying cause of conflict and insecurity in the Third World is the early stage of state making at which postcolonial states find themselves. Drawing comparisons with the West European experience, he argues that this approach provides richer comparative    More >

The Third World Security Predicament:  State Making, Regional Conflict, and the International System

Resolving International Conflicts: The Theory and Practice

Jacob Bercovitch, editor

Mediation is rapidly becoming one of the most important methods of settling conflicts in the post-Cold War world, practiced by virtually every actor and dealing with every conceivable issue in the relations between states. This book represents the most recent trends in and thinking about the process and practice of international mediation. A coherent, analytical, well-integrated text, complete    More >

The State in Transition: Reimagining Political Space

Joseph A. Camilleri, Anthony P. Jarvis, and Albert J. Paolini, editors

Until recently, the bounded, territorial, and sovereign state has been the foundation of modern understandings of political space. Now, however, as the patterns of world politics undergo major transformations through the competing processes of global integration and fragmentation, we are faced with the problem of how to conceptualize new and complex relationships. Further, addressing this problem    More >

The Return of Culture and Identity in IR Theory

Yosef Lapid and Friedrich Kratochwil, editors

Unanticipated epochal events associated with the demise of the Cold War have prompted the recognition that the post-Cold War order is transforming itself culturally even faster than it is changing geopolitically or economically. Within this context, this volume explores the scope and promise of the "return" of culture and identity to the IR theoretical agenda. The authors address a    More >

The Global Economy as Political Space

Stephen J. Rosow, Naeem Inayatullah, and Mark Rupert, editors

As contemporary capitalism integrates the planet to an unprecedented extent, the international political economy defines and constitutes new forces, practices, and movements. Not only are power centers shifting away from Cold War poles, but also the spatial and temporal frames of social life, both domestic and international, are reorganizing. Addressing these transformations, the authors of this    More >

Beyond Positivism: Critical Reflections on International Relations

Claire Turenne Sjolander and Wayne S. Cox

The metatheoretical debates between positivists and postpositivists that characterized the development of IR theory during the 1980s left at least one major question unanswered: what does postpositivist scholarship look like? This book offers an answer to that question, proceeding from the premise that the metatheoretical debates have reached an impasse, and suggesting that scholarship motivated    More >

Rethinking Peace

Robert Elias and Jennifer Turpin, editors

With the development of the atomic bomb, Albert Einstein remarked that everything had changed except our thinking about the world. Einstein and Bertrand Russell warned us that "we have to learn to think in a new way. . . . shall we put an end to the human race; or shall we renounce war?" Unfortunately, we are facing the end of this century still in the midst of wars of various    More >

Discourses of Global Politics: A Critical (Re)Introduction to International Relations

Jim George

An unusual combination of synthesis and original scholarship, this new text considers the contemporary agenda of international relations within a broad historical-philosophical context. George first deals explicitly with precisely how, and with what effect, the dominant post-World War II approaches to international relations are located in this larger context. He then concentrates on the    More >

Seeking Security and Development: The Impact of Military Spending and ArmsTransfers

Norman A. Graham, editor

Do military expenditures retard economic growth and development, enhance the development process, or neither? How effective are military and military-dominated regimes in promoting economic development? What is the impact of military expenditures and arms acquisitions on conflict patterns? Exploring the causal links between military expenditures and economic development in the Third World, the    More >

Arms Control Without Negotiation: From the Cold War to the New World Order

Bennett Ramberg, editor

Beginning with Mikhail Gorbachev's December 1988 announcement that Moscow intended to unilaterally reduce its conventional armed forces, the spotlight on arms control has turned away from negotiated treaties toward unilateral reductions, and there have been a number of reciprocal reductions not subject to negotiation. While these initiatives appear novel, this book demonstrates that they are only    More >

Collective Security in a Changing World

Thomas G. Weiss, editor

This volume analyzes institutional mechanisms in the United Nations and in regional organizations that exist to deal with threats to the peace, and also examines what the U.S. response should be to the evolving opportunity to strengthen collective security. The numerous theoretical and practical problems of guaranteeing international security in the 1990s provide the substance for analysis by    More >

Common Security and Nonoffensive Defense: A Neorealist Perspective

Bjorn Møller

Bjorn Møller explores the implications of switching to a new type of defense structure, nonoffensive defense (NOD), that would maintain an undiminished—or even improved—capability for defense while possessing no offensive capabilities. The advantages of such a switch, he posits, would be enhanced possibilities for arms control and disarmament, increased crisis stability, and the    More >

Environment and Diplomacy in the Americas

Heraldo Muñoz, editor

The deterioration of the environment in the Americas exacts urgent and decisive action—a diagnosis shared by all 34 member countries of the Organization of American States. Consequently, in 1990 the OAS began a process of diplomatic debates oriented toward creating an inter-American system of nature conservation. This effort culminated at the June 1991 General Assembly in Santiago de Chile,    More >

The Caribbean in the Pacific Century: Prospects for Caribbean-PacificCooperation

Jacqueline A. Braveboy-Wagner, with W. Marvin Will, Dennis J. Gayle, and Ivelaw Griffith

Despite the current global focus on prospects for the integrated European market, there are many in the policymaking and business communities who believe that the next century will be a Pacific, rather than a European, one. Not only does U.S. trade with East Asia far exceed its trans-Atlantic commerce, but recent figures show that the countries of Asia Pacific account for more than 40 percent of    More >

The Wave of the Future: The United Nations and Naval Peacekeeping

Robert Stephens Staley II

Though the United Nations will face numerous challenges on the world's oceans in the next decades, it has not yet developed the capability to operate effectively in the areas of maritime peacekeeping or enforcement. This study examines the various regional maritime challenges confronting the United Nations and describes several organizational and experiential models—ranging from    More >

The Insecurity Dilemma: National Security of Third World States

Brian L. Job, editor

Positing an "insecurity dilemma," in which national security, defined as regime security by state authorities, becomes pitted against the incompatible demands of ethnic, social, and religious forces, this book addresses the problems and prospects for security in the Third World in the 1990s. The authors advance four lines of argument: First, there is a need to rethink the traditional    More >

People, States, and Fear, 2nd ed.: An Agenda for International Security in the Post-Cold War Era

Barry Buzan

The second edition of this widely acclaimed book has been fully revised and updated to include: emphasis on economic, societal, and environmental aspects of security completely rewritten chapters on threat, the international political system, and economic security a new chapter on regional security developments in security concepts during the 1980s expanded discussion of the theory of    More >

An Ethic of Responsibility in International Relations

Daniel Warner

Questioning many of the traditional assumptions found in discussions of ethics in international relations, Daniel Warner presents an original understanding of what an "ethic of responsibility" should be. Arguing against Weber's classic definition, he examines the implications of responsibility as responsiveness on both the individual and international levels. By beginning with    More >

Peacemaking in Civil War: International Mediation in Zimbabwe, 1974-1980

Stephen John Stedman

Challenging the literatures on war termination, civil war, and revolution—which typically dismiss the possibility of negotiated settlement—Stephen Stedman examines the problem of negotiations during civil wars and demonstrates that third party mediation can help resolve such conflicts. Stedman analyzes four international attempts to mediate a settlement to the Zimbabwean civil war of    More >

Ralph Bunche: The Man and His Times

Benjamin Rivlin, editor

Illuminating the many facets of his career and exploring his extraordinary legacy, a distinguished group of authors examine Nobel peace laureate Ralph Bunche's ideas and activities ranging from his involvement in the civil rights movement to his work at the United Nations. As they reflect on Bunche's responses to some of the crucial problems that confronted the United States during his    More >

Ralph Bunche: The Man and His Times

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations

Ramesh Thakur, editor-in-chief, with Mónica Serrano, Brian Job, and Diana Tussie, editors

Global Governance showcases the expertise of leading scholars and practitioners concerned with the processes of international cooperation and multilateralism. The result is a provocative exploration of the most pressing transnational challenges of our time—issues of peace and security, development, human rights, the environment, and health among them—presenting    More >

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations