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Security in South America: The Role of States and Regional Organizations

Rodrigo Tavares

What types of threats and conflicts affect the countries of South America? What roles can and should states and regional organizations play in maintaining both traditional and human security in the region? Ranging from armed conflicts, terrorism, and the arms trade to political crises, drug trafficking, and environmental concerns, Rodrigo Tavares provides a comprehensive discussion of the issues    More >

Security in South America: The Role of States and Regional Organizations

Prohibiting Chemical and Biological Weapons: Multilateral Regimes and Their Evolution

Alexander Kelle

Whether in the arsenals of states or of terrorist groups, chemical and biological weapons (CBW) are increasingly seen as one of the major threats to global security. Alexander Kelle provides a comprehensive assessment of the multilateral prohibition regimes that have been established to confront the risks posed by CBW in the context of rapid scientific and technological advances.    More >

Prohibiting Chemical and Biological Weapons: Multilateral Regimes and Their Evolution

Assessing the War on Terror

Mohammed Ayoob and Etga Ugur, editors

Was the US-led war on terror, especially the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, a necessary response to the September 11 terrorist attacks? What did the two invasions accomplish? How have the fortunes of al-Qaeda and like-minded organizations been affected? The authors of this important contribution to ongoing debates address these questions as they assess the impact and implications of the war on    More >

Assessing the War on Terror

Northeast Asia’s Nuclear Challenges

Su Hoon Lee, editor

An array of challenges threaten the peace and security of Northeast Asia, not least how to contain a nuclear North Korea and ensure the safety of the region’s nuclear power structure. Addressing multiple dimensions of these crucial issues, the authors of Northeast Asia's Nuclear Challenges highlight the cooperative approaches needed not only among the primary actors—China, the two    More >

Northeast Asia’s Nuclear Challenges

North American Regional Security: A Trilateral Framework?

Richard J. Kilroy, Jr., Abelardo Rodríguez Sumano, and Todd S. Hataley

Has the emergence of new transnational threats—terrorism, drug cartels, natural disasters—affected the dynamics of security relations among Canada, Mexico, and the United States? What is the likely future of these relations in a highly securitized world? Richard Kilroy, Abelardo Rodríguez Sumano, and Todd Hataley trace the evolution of security relations in North America from    More >

North American Regional Security: A Trilateral Framework?

US National Security: Policymakers, Processes, and Politics, 5th Edition

Sam C. Sarkesian, John Allen Williams, and Stephen J. Cimbala

The fifth edition of US National Security retains the structure and approach that have made this text so successful, but it has been revised and updated throughout to reflect the challenges faced by the Obama administration. The choices necessary in an increasingly budget-constrained environment, the broader range of national security issues, and the evolving nature of counterinsurgency doctrine    More >

US National Security: Policymakers, Processes, and Politics, 5th Edition

US Policy in Afghanistan and Iraq: Lessons and Legacies

Seyom Brown and Robert H. Scales, editors

How have the costs, both human and material, of US involvement in the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq affected the country's will for conducting regime-change operations? What are the implications for issues of strategy? The authors of US Policy in Afghanistan and Iraq assess the impact of the two conflicts on US foreign policy, military planning, and capacities for counterinsurgency and    More >

US Policy in Afghanistan and Iraq: Lessons and Legacies

US Taiwan Strait Policy: The Origins of Strategic Ambiguity

Dean P. Chen

Why did the Truman administration reject a pragmatic approach to the Taiwan Strait conflict—recognizing Beijing and severing ties with Taipei—and instead choose the path of strategic ambiguity? Dean Chen sheds light on current US policy by exploring the thoughts and deliberations of President Truman and his top advisers, among them Dean Acheson, John Foster Dulles, Livingston Merchant,    More >

US Taiwan Strait Policy: The Origins of Strategic Ambiguity

Nuclear North Korea: Regional Dynamics, Failed Policies, and Ideas for Ending a Global Stalemate

Su Hoon Lee, editor

North Korea's development of weapons of mass destruction has not only affected regional security, but also caused considerable anxiety at the global level. The authors of Nuclear North Korea explore the whats, whys, and hows of the DPRK's nuclear program and offer fresh ideas on how to contain the country's nuclear ambitions.    More >

Nuclear North Korea: Regional Dynamics, Failed Policies, and Ideas for Ending a Global Stalemate

Terrorism, Security, and Human Rights: Harnessing the Rule of Law

Mahmood Monshipouri

Scholars and policymakers disagree on the most effective way to counter transnational terrorism, generating debate on a range of questions: Do military interventions increase or decrease the recruitment capability of transnational terrorists? Should we privilege diplomacy over military force in the campaign against terror? Can counterterrorist measures be applied without violating human rights?    More >

Terrorism, Security, and Human Rights: Harnessing the Rule of Law

EU Security Policy: What It Is, How It Works, Why It Matters

Michael Merlingen

What is the European Union's security and defense policy (CSDP)? How does it work? Does it make a difference in international security affairs? How do other global actors react to Europe’s new assertiveness? And how do theories of international relations account for the trajectory of EU integration in the high politics of national security? In this comprehensive survey and analysis,    More >

EU Security Policy: What It Is, How It Works, Why It Matters

The Police in War: Fighting Insurgency, Terrorism, and Violent Crime

David H. Bayley and Robert M. Perito

Frustrated efforts in both Iraq and Afghanistan give urgency to the question of how to craft effective, humane, and legitimate security institutions in conflict-ridden states—and whether legitimate policing can in fact be developed in the midst of insurgency and terrorism. David H. Bayley and Robert M. Perito confront these questions head on. Against the backdrop of failed US attempts to    More >

The Police in War: Fighting Insurgency, Terrorism, and Violent Crime

Coalition Politics and the Iraq War: Determinants of Choice

Daniel F. Baltrusaitis

Why do states join ad hoc military coalitions? What motivated South Korea to contribute significantly to the Iraq War "coalition of the willing," while such steadfast allies as Turkey and Germany resisted US pressure to become burden-sharing partners? Drawing on his extensive examination of South Korean, German, and Turkish politics in the approach to and during the Iraq War, Daniel    More >

Coalition Politics and the Iraq War: Determinants of Choice

Beyond Market Forces: Regulating the Global Security Industry

James Cockayne, with Emily Speers Mears, Iveta Cherneva, Alison Gurin, Sheila Oviedo, and Dylan Yaeger

Private military and security companies play an increasingly visible role in conflict and postconflict situations. Properly regulated, they may offer efficient and responsive means for governments to deliver security in insecure environments. But well-publicized abuses suggest that an adequate regulatory framework is still urgently needed. In response, Beyond Market Forces articulates clear    More >

Beyond Market Forces: Regulating the Global Security Industry

Arms Control and Cooperative Security

Jeffrey A. Larsen and James J. Wirtz, editors

Reflecting the ongoing debate about the value of traditional arms control in today’s security environment, Arms Control and Cooperative Security thoroughly covers this complex topic. The authors critically review the historical record, highlight recent changes in the security arena, and consider the likelihood of new arms control agreements. Throughout, the discussion is presented in the    More >

Arms Control and Cooperative Security

The Problem of Force: Grappling with the Global Battlefield

Simon W. Murden

Why, despite indisputably superior military might, have the US-led military interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq been so fraught with setbacks? Does it make sense in today’s security environment to use military force to achieve strategic objectives? How does the contemporary battlefield function? Addressing these questions, Simon Murden explores the contradictions inherent in attempting to    More >

The Problem of Force:  Grappling with the Global Battlefield

Security Cooperation in Africa: A Reappraisal

Benedikt Franke

In the midst of the atrocities reported in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the seemingly constant strife in the Horn of Africa, and the ongoing violence in Darfur, how do we make sense of the simultaneous increase in interstate security cooperation in Africa? To what extent, and why, does this cooperation differ from previous initiatives? In what direction is it heading? Benedikt Franke assesses    More >

Security Cooperation in Africa: A Reappraisal

Transforming Defense Capabilities: New Approaches for International Security

Scott Jasper, editor

In the face of today’s security challenges, there is widespread recognition of the need to think and act in new ways to ensure both national and collective security interests. Transforming Defense Capabilities succinctly describes what transformation means in this context, why it is essential, and how to translate innovative concepts into relevant, feasible, and useful practice. The authors    More >

Transforming Defense Capabilities: New Approaches for International Security

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2008

Center on International Cooperation

Unique in its breadth of coverage, the Annual Review of Global Peace Operations presents the most detailed collection of data on peace operations—those launched by the UN, by regional organizations, by coalitions, and by individual nations—that is available. Features of the 2008 volume include: a summary analysis of the trends and developments in peace operations through 2007 a    More >

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2008

Bioterrorism: Confronting a Complex Threat

Andreas Wenger and Reto Wollenmann, editors

Especially since the anthrax attacks of 2001, the issue of bioterrorism has been controversial: Are governments underestimating the potential hazard of biological toxins, as some claim, or is the danger in fact exaggerated? What are the policy options for dealing with such a complex threat? The authors of this book offer a reasoned assessment of the issues at the core of the    More >

Bioterrorism: Confronting a Complex Threat

The Morality of War: A Reader

David Kinsella and Craig L. Carr, editors

When and why is war justified? How, morally speaking, should wars be fought? The Morality of War confronts these challenging questions, surveying the fundamental principles and themes of the just war tradition through the words of the philosophers, jurists, and warriors who have shaped it. The collection begins with the foundational works of just war theory, as well as those of two competing    More >

The Morality of War: A Reader

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2007

Center on International Cooperation

Unique in its breadth and depth of coverage, the Annual Review of Global Peace Operations presents the most detailed collection of data on peace operations—those launched by the UN, by regional organizations, by coalitions, and by individual nations—that is available. Features of the 2007 volume include:   an introductory essay on the priorities and processes crucial to    More >

Annual Review of Global Peace Operations, 2007

Iraq: Preventing a New Generation of Conflict

Markus E. Bouillon, David M. Malone, and Ben Rowswell editors

Is an end to the violence in Iraq, and the establishment of an enduring peace within a unified state, a realistic goal? Addressing this question, the authors of Iraq Preventing a New Generation of Conflict consider the sources of conflict in the country and outline the requirements for a successful peacebuilding enterprise.    More >

Iraq: Preventing a New Generation of Conflict

The Iraq War: Causes and Consequences

Rick Fawn and Raymond Hinnebusch, editors

While the war in Afghanistan saw most industrial countries back the US-led campaign, the subsequent war in Iraq profoundly divided international opinion—and likely represents a watershed in the post-Cold War international order. The Iraq War examines the full range of explanations of the conflict, as well as its significance for the Middle East, for key international relationships, and for    More >

The Iraq War: Causes and Consequences

The Meaning of Military Victory

Robert Mandel

How has the concept of victory evolved as the nature of conflict itself has changed across time, circumstance, and culture? And to what end? Robert Mandel addresses these questions, consider¬ing the meanings, misperceptions, and challenges associated with military victory in the context of the nontraditional wars of recent decades.   Without an understanding of precisely what victory    More >

The Meaning of Military Victory

How States Fight Terrorism: Policy Dynamics in the West

Doron Zimmermann and Andreas Wenger, editors

As national governments struggle to cope with the complex threat of mass-casualty terrorist attacks, there is an ongoing debate about the best approaches to counterterrorism policy. The authors of How States Fight Terrorism explore the dynamics of counterterrorism policy development in Europe and North America. A series of case studies examine security concerns, political debates and policy    More >

How States Fight Terrorism: Policy Dynamics in the West

Guns and Butter: The Political Economy of International Security

Peter Dombrowski, editor

Reflecting the growing interest among scholars and practitioners in the relationship between security affairs and economics, this new volume explores the nature of that relationship in the first decade of the 21st century.   Among the issues addressed in the book are the impact of the events of September 11 and of the US response. The authors also consider whether the challenges of the    More >

Guns and Butter: The Political Economy of International Security

Critical Security Studies and World Politics

Ken Booth, editor

Realist assumptions of security studies increasingly have been challenged by an approach that places the human being, rather than the state, at the center of security concerns. This text is an indispensable statement of the ideas of this critical security project, written by some of its leading exponents.   The book is structured around three concepts—security, community, and    More >

Critical Security Studies and World Politics

International Security: An Analytical Survey

Michael Sheehan

Michael Sheehan provides a masterly survey of the varied positions that scholars have adopted in interpreting "security"—one of the most contested terms in international relations—and proposes a synthesis that both widens and deepens our understanding of the concept.   Sheehan first outlines the classical realist approach of Morgenthau and Carr and the ideas of their    More >

International Security: An Analytical Survey

The Norms of War: Cultural Beliefs and Modern Conflict

Theo Farrell

Although the horrors of war are manifest, academic debate is dominated by accounts that reinforce the concept of warfare as a rational project. Seeking to explain this paradox—to uncover the motivations at the core of warring communities—Theo Farrell explores the cultural forces that have shaped modern Western conflict.   Farrell finds that the norms of war—shared beliefs    More >

The Norms of War: Cultural Beliefs and Modern Conflict

Men, Militarism, and UN Peacekeeping: A Gendered Analysis

Sandra Whitworth

Sandra Whitworth looks behind the rhetoric to investigate from a feminist perspective some of the realities of military intervention under the UN flag.   Whitworth contends that there is a fundamental contradiction between portrayals of peacekeeping as altruistic and benign and the militarized masculinity that underpins the group identity of soldiers. Examining evidence from Cambodia and    More >

Men, Militarism, and UN Peacekeeping: A Gendered Analysis

Security, Strategy and the Quest for Bloodless War

Robert Mandel

In recent decades, government and military officials alike have pushed increasingly in the direction of "bloodless wars," where confrontations are undertaken—and ultimately won—with minimum loss of human life. Robert Mandel provides the first comprehensive analysis of this trend.   After exploring the moral, legal, military, and political bases of the desire to    More >

Security, Strategy and the Quest for Bloodless War

War and Intervention: Issues for Contemporary Peace Operations

Michael V. Bhatia

War and Intervention explains how armed forces, aid agencies, and transitional adminsitrations in war-affected countries have adapted to the changing circumstances of modern war and conflict. It uses a broad range of cases to introduce the reader to the dynamics on the ground. Bhatia's analysis becomes all the more important at a time when the debate continues about the United States's    More >

War and Intervention: Issues for Contemporary Peace Operations

War Crimes: Confronting Atrocity in the Modern World

David Chuter

War crimes typically are discussed in sensational terms or in the dry language of international law. In contrast, David Chuter brings clarity to this complex subject, exploring why atrocities occur and what can be done to identify perpetrators and bring them to justice.   Chuter confronts the real horror of the murder, rape, and torture that are subsumed under the dispassionate phrase    More >

War Crimes: Confronting Atrocity in the Modern World

The Whistleblower of Dimona: Israel, Vanunu, and the Bomb

Yoel Cohen

In 1986, Mordechai Vanunu, a technician at Israel's highly secret nuclear arms research center at Dimona, disclosed highly classified details about Israel's nuclear arms program to the London Sunday Times. As a result, Vanunu was kidnapped from London and taken back to Israel where, after a closed- door trial, he was sentenced to eighteen years imprisonment for espionage and    More >

The Whistleblower of Dimona: Israel, Vanunu, and the Bomb

Strategic Thinking: An Introduction and Farewell

Philip Windsor, edited by Mats Berdal and Spyros Economides

In this, his final book, Philip Windsor explores the emergence, meaning, and significance of the Cold War mentality. Tracing the evolution of strategic thinking from its origins in medieval Europe to the demise of the Cold War, he considers the peculiar character and autonomy that strategy acquired in the nuclear age. Windsor is concerned with changes in our understanding of war and    More >

Strategic Thinking: An Introduction and Farewell

Democracy and War: The End of an Illusion?

Errol A. Henderson

Errol Henderson critically examines what has been called the closest thing to an empirical law in world politics, the concept of the democratic peace.   Henderson tests two versions of the democratic peace proposition (DPP)—that democracies rarely if ever fight one another, and that democracies are more peaceful in general than nondemocracies—using exactly the same data and    More >

Democracy and War: The End of an Illusion?

Waging War Without Warriors? The Changing Culture of Military Conflict

Christopher Coker

In the past, posits Christopher Coker, wars were all-encompassing; they were a test not only of individual bravery, but of an entire community's will to survive. In the West today, in contrast, wars are tools of foreign policy, not intrinsic to the values of a society—they are instrumental rather than existential. The clash between these two "cultures of war" can be seen starkly in    More >

Waging War Without Warriors? The Changing Culture of Military Conflict

Arms Control: Cooperative Security in a Changing Environment

Jeffrey A. Larsen, editor

More than a decade after the end of the Cold War, the need to control the spread of arms remains clear, while the usefulness of traditional paradigms is increasingly called into question. The authors of Arms Control thoroughly review this complex topic, exploring differing approaches to arms control, successes and failures thus far, and the likelihood of future agreements. Ranging from the U.S.    More >

Arms Control: Cooperative Security in a Changing Environment

The Sources of Military Change: Culture, Politics, Technology

Theo Farrell and Terry Terriff, editors

In varying circumstances, military organizations around the world are undergoing major restructuring. This book explores why, and how, militaries change. The authors focus on a complex of three influencing factors—cultural norms, politics, and new technology—offering a historical perspective of more than a century. Their analyses range from developing states to Russia, Britain, the    More >

Armies Without States: The Privatization of Security

Robert Mandel

What does the increasing use of private security forces mean for governments? For individuals? Armies Without States offers a comprehensive analysis of the varieties, causes, and consequences of this growing phenomenon.   Ranging from the international to the subnational level and from the use of mercenaries by private parties to the government outsourcing of military operations, Mandel    More >

Europe's New Security Challenges

Heinz Gärtner, Adrian Hyde-Price, and Erich Reiter, editors

A central point of controversy among both academics and policymakers is the nature and significance of security in the post–Cold War world. Engaging that discussion, this original collection explores the new security challenges facing Europe. The authors assess the relevance and usefulness of various actors and various approaches for tackling those security challenges. Seeking to avoid    More >

Europe's New Security Challenges

Enlarging NATO: The National Debates

Gale A. Mattox and Arthur R. Rachwald, editors

Thoroughly examining the deliberations over nato enlargement in twelve countries—five current members of the alliance; three invited to join in the first round of enlargement; two seeking membership; and Russia and Ukraine, both involved with nato, but unlikely to join—the authors shed light on the political motives leading to each country's position. Their comparative analysis    More >

Through the Valley: Vietnam, 1967-1968

James F. Humphries

A Main Selection of the Military Book Club The fierce close combat in the remote areas of South Vietnam’s northern provinces in 1967-1968—the battles of Hiep Duc, March 11, Nhi Ha, and Hill 406—has been a strangely underreported slice of the Vietnam War. Through the Valley brings those battles into sharp focus, chronicling the efforts of the proud units of the Americal Division    More >

Through the Valley:  Vietnam, 1967-1968

The Weapons State: Proliferation and the Framing of Security

David Mutimer

The proliferation of all kinds of weapons (nuclear, chemical, biological, and even conventional) is emerging as a focal point for international security. This book shows how both the language used to talk about weapons proliferation and the practices adopted to respond to it serve to define the problem in ways that promote policy responses doomed to failure. Examining the metaphors that have been    More >

The Weapons State: Proliferation and the Framing of Security

Biological Warfare: Modern Offense and Defense

Raymond A. Zilinskas, editor

Recent revelations about Iraqi and Soviet/Russian biological weapons programs and highly publicized events such as the deployment of anthrax and botulinum by the Aum Shinrikyo sect in Japan have made clear the necessity for addressing the issues of biological warfare and defense. In a comprehensive analysis of this imminent threat to global security, fourteen internationally recognized authorities    More >

Biological Warfare: Modern Offense and Defense

The Second Nuclear Age

Colin S. Gray

Colin Gray returns nuclear weapons to the center stage of international politics. Taking issue with the complacent belief that a happy mixture of deterrence, arms control, and luck will enable humanity to cope adequately with weapons of mass destruction (WMD), Gray argues that the risk posed by WMD is ever more serious. Policy that ignores the present nuclear age, he cautions, is policy that    More >

Doughboy War: The American Expeditionary Force in World War I

James H. Hallas

This multi-layered history of World War I’s doughboys recapitulates the enthusiasm of scores of soldiers as they trained for war, voyaged to France, and finally, faced the harsh reality of combat on the Western Front. Drawing on journals, diaries, personal narratives, and unit histories, Hallas relates the story of men in combat—the men behind the rifles. He has crafted a vivid    More >

The Arms Dynamic in World Politics

Barry Buzan and Eric Herring

What is the relationship between the arms dynamic and world politics? How has that relationship changed? Considering the entire set of factors that influence the nature of armed forces, this comprehensive book puts these essential questions into historical and analytical perspective. Buzan and Herring focus on four themes. In Part 1 they discuss the ways in which the political and military    More >

Security: A New Framework for Analysis

Barry Buzan, Ole Wæver, and Jaap de Wilde

Traditionalists in the field of security studies tend to restrict the subject to politico–military issues; while wideners want to extend it to the economic, societal, and environmental sectors. This book sets out a comprehensive statement of the new security studies, establishing the case for the broader agenda. The authors argue that security is a particular type of politics applicable to    More >

Security: A New Framework for Analysis

Mixed Motives, Uncertain Outcomes: Defense Conversion in China

Jorn Brömmelhörster and John Frankenstein, editors

Mixed Motives, Uncertain Outcomes looks critically at China's efforts to adapt its vast military- industrial complex to the service of its socialist market economy. The authors—all of whom have witnessed or participated first-hand in the country's defense conversion—offer political, macroeconomic, business, and military perspectives on this complex issue. The book places the    More >

The Third World Security Predicament: State Making, Regional Conflict, and the International System

Mohammed Ayoob

This book explores the multifaceted security problems facing the Third World in the aftermath of the Cold War. Ayoob proposes that the major underlying cause of conflict and insecurity in the Third World is the early stage of state making at which postcolonial states find themselves. Drawing comparisons with the West European experience, he argues that this approach provides richer comparative    More >

Seeking Security and Development: The Impact of Military Spending and ArmsTransfers

Norman A. Graham, editor

Do military expenditures retard economic growth and development, enhance the development process, or neither? How effective are military and military-dominated regimes in promoting economic development? What is the impact of military expenditures and arms acquisitions on conflict patterns? Exploring the causal links between military expenditures and economic development in the Third World, the    More >

Arms Control Without Negotiation: From the Cold War to the New World Order

Bennett Ramberg, editor

Beginning with Mikhail Gorbachev's December 1988 announcement that Moscow intended to unilaterally reduce its conventional armed forces, the spotlight on arms control has turned away from negotiated treaties toward unilateral reductions, and there have been a number of reciprocal reductions not subject to negotiation. While these initiatives appear novel, this book demonstrates that they are only    More >

The Insecurity Dilemma: National Security of Third World States

Brian L. Job, editor

Positing an "insecurity dilemma," in which national security, defined as regime security by state authorities, becomes pitted against the incompatible demands of ethnic, social, and religious forces, this book addresses the problems and prospects for security in the Third World in the 1990s. The authors advance four lines of argument: First, there is a need to rethink the traditional    More >

Common Security and Nonoffensive Defense: A Neorealist Perspective

Bjorn Møller

Bjorn Møller explores the implications of switching to a new type of defense structure, nonoffensive defense (NOD), that would maintain an undiminished—or even improved—capability for defense while possessing no offensive capabilities. The advantages of such a switch, he posits, would be enhanced possibilities for arms control and disarmament, increased crisis stability, and the    More >

People, States, and Fear, 2nd ed.: An Agenda for International Security in the Post-ColdWar Era

Barry Buzan

The second edition of this widely acclaimed book has been fully revised and updated to include: emphasis on economic, societal, and environmental aspects of security completely rewritten chapters on threat, the international political system, and economic security a new chapter on regional security developments in security concepts during the 1980s expanded discussion of the theory of    More >