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A Cautionary Tale: Failed U.S. Development Policy in Central America

Michael E. Conroy, Douglas L. Murray, and Peter M. Rosset

Neither structural adjustment policies, nor industrialization, nor traditional agricultural exports have led to sustained economic growth and social equity in Central America. Seeking to reinvigorate the region's struggling economies, U.S. AID—supported by the World Bank and the IMF—designed a new development policy, one based on nontraditional agricultural exports. Crops ranging    More >

A Culture of Collusion: An Inside Look at the Mexican Press

William A. Orme, Jr., editor

Few outsiders are fully aware of the complex relationship between the ostensibly independent news media in Mexico and the governing Institutional Revolutionary Party—a relationship enforced by subsidies, bribery, fear of violence, and mutual political convenience. This groundbreaking collection of analytical essays by leading Mexican and U.S. journalists examines the culture of collusion and    More >

Another Life: Fully Annotated

Derek Walcott, with a critical essay and comprehensive notes by Edward Baugh and Colbert Nepaulsingh

This near-definitive study sets a new standard for the kind of meticulous scholarship that Nobel laureate Derek Walcott's poetry deserves. Another Life, Walcott's masterpiece of autobiography in verse is an ideal point of entry into Walcott's work. The 200 pages of detailed notes and commentary offered in this annotated edition—drawing to a great extent on unpublished    More >

Another Life: Fully Annotated

Argentina’s Foreign Policy: Domestic Politics and Democracy Promotion in the Americas

Ana Margheritis

Why would a state commit to foreign policy actions that do not appear to have relevance to its national interests? And what can we learn from Argentina’s extensive involvement in democracy promotion in the Americas? Addressing these related questions, Ana Margheritis explores the interaction of presidential power, regional issues, and domestic instability in the shaping of Argentina's    More >

Argentina’s Foreign Policy: Domestic Politics and Democracy Promotion in the Americas

Beyond Praetorianism: The Latin American Military in Transition

Richard L. Millett and Michael Gold-Biss, editors

The post-Cold War world has presented Latin American militaries with new, unsettling realities: diminished threats from insurgencies, governments' inability to control the flow of information, the necessity of operating within a global economic system, and a lost ability by weaker states to manipulate external actors. These conditions are placing military institutions under pressure to support    More >

Black Shack Alley [a novel]

Joseph Zobel, translated and with an introduction by Keith Q. Warner, with a preface by Christian Filostrat

This work of compelling lyrical unity tells the story of growing up black in the colonial world of Martinique. Not only does the young hero, José, have to fight the ignorance and poverty of plantation life, but he must also learn to survive the all-pervasive French cultural saturation—to remain true to himself, proud of his race and his family. His ally in this struggle is his    More >

Brazil's New Racial Politics

Bernd Reiter and Gladys L. Mitchell, editors

As the popular myth of racial equality in Brazil crumbles beneath the weight of current grassroots politics, how will the country redefine itself as a multiethnic nation? Brazil’s New Racial Politics captures the myriad questions and problems unleashed by a growing awareness of the ways racism structures Brazilian society. The authors bridge the gap between scholarship and activism as    More >

Brazil's New Racial Politics

Building Democracy in Latin America, 3rd edition

John Peeler

The third edition of this historically and theoretically grounded analysis of the democratic experience in Latin America reflects important developments both in the region and in the comparative politics literature. Placing the subject in a normative context, John Peeler gives significant attention to the adequacy of a purely electoral concept of democracy. He also addresses the problems that    More >

Building Democracy in Latin America, 3rd edition

Building Peace in Haiti

Chetan Kumar

Though its national life often has been characterized by violence, Haiti has not been victim of a full-fledged internal conflict, or civil war. Why, then, is the international community conducting "postconflict peacebuilding" operations there? Addressing that question, Chetan Kumar examines the course of international involvement in Haiti through the prism of the country's unique    More >

Capital City Politics in Latin America: Democratization and Empowerment

David J. Myers and Henry A. Dietz, editors

As Latin America's new democratic regimes have decentralized, the region's capital cities—and their elected mayors—have gained increasing importance. Capital City Politics in Latin America tells the story of these cities: how they are changing operationally, how the the empowerment of mayors and other municipal institutions is exacerbating political tensions between local    More >

Capital City Politics in Latin America: Democratization and Empowerment

Chile's Middle Class: A Struggle for Survivial in the Face of Neoliberalism

Larissa Lomnitz and Ana Melnick

Over the past ten years, most Latin American countries have experienced dramatic economic changes as a result of their enormous debt burden, with a diminished economic role for the state and a consequent drastic cut in state social expenditures. The authors of this provocative book explore the clearly negative impact of these changes on the middle class in Chile, where the military government was    More >

Chile, Pinochet, and the Caravan of Death

Patricia Verdugo, translated by Marcelo Montecino, with an introduction by Paul E. Sigmund

Patricia Verdugo's narrative offers compelling evidence of the mass execution of 75 political prisoners that began General Augusto Pinochet's 20-year dictatorship. The "caravan of death" killings—carried out by Sergio Arellano Stark, the high-ranking general appointed by Pinochet to head the operation—terrorized Chile and crushed the country's long-standing    More >

Chile, Pinochet, and the Caravan of Death

China Engages Latin America: Tracing the Trajectory

Adrian H. Hearn and José Luis León-Manríquez, editors

What inroads is China making in Latin America? In China Engages Latin America, experts from three continents provide local answers to this global question. The authors explore the multiple motivations driving the establishment of new Sino–Latin American linkages, the nature of those linkages, and the reactions that they have generated. They also examine how China–Latin America    More >

China Engages Latin America: Tracing the Trajectory

China in Latin America: The Whats and Wherefores

R. Evan Ellis

With China on the minds of many in Latin America—from politicians and union leaders to people on the street, from business students to senior bankers—a number of important questions arise. Why, for example, is China so rapidly expanding its ties with the region? What is the nature of the new connection, and how will it affect institutions, economic structures, politics, and society? R.    More >

China in Latin America: The Whats and Wherefores

Citizenship in Latin America

Joseph S. Tulchin and Meg Ruthenburg, editors

Is democracy in Latin America in trouble, as many now argue? Or is the increasingly overt political participation of both "average" and marginalized citizens evidence to the contrary? This important collection focuses on citizenship to shed light on the dynamics and obstacles that the region's democracies now face.   The authors place citizenship in the context of democratic    More >

Citizenship in Latin America

Civil Society and the Summit of the Americas: The 1998 Santiago Summit

Richard Feinberg and Robin Rosenberg, editors

The Summit of the Americas process, which began at the Miami Summit in 1994, has created unprecedented opportunities for the involvement of civil society actors in decisionmaking and the implementation of important initiatives in the social, economic, and political life of the Western Hemisphere. This volume documents the wide-ranging involvement of non-governmental and other sectors in the Summit    More >

Confronting Globalization: Economic Integration and Popular Resistance in Mexico

Timothy A. Wise, Hilda Salazar and Laura Carlsen, editors

Is the current model for economic globalization good for the poor or the environment? Are there alternatives? Amid rising worldwide protests that corporate elites wield too much influence over global economic governance, this book on Mexico's experience under the North American Free Trade Agreement offers insights into both questions.    More >

Confronting Globalization: Economic Integration and Popular Resistance in Mexico

Coping with Capital Surges: The Return of Finance to Latin America

Ricardo Ffrench-Davis and Stephany Griffith-Jones, editors

Private capital flows to Latin America have increased dramatically since 1989, approximately doubling in volume each year. This book examines the possible causes and consequences of the new—and unforeseen—wave of investment, from both the borrower and the lender perspectives. The authors first analyze foreign direct investment, securities, and bank lending, considering the motivations    More >

Corruption and Political Reform in Brazil: The Impact of Collor's Impeachment

Keith S. Rosenn and Richard Downes, editors

Exploring the difficulties of inducing meaningful political reform in Brazil's "bureaucratic-authoritarian" era, this volume examines the impact of the fall of Fernando Collor de Mello. The authors, representing historical, constitutional, and institutional perspectives, focus on themes related to the linkages between corruption and political reform: the range of corrupt activities by    More >

Corruption and Politics in Latin America: National and Regional Dynamics

Stephen D. Morris and Charles H. Blake, editors

Does corruption grease the wheels of Latin American politics, facilitating its operation? Or does it undermine democratic rule and worsen the perennial problems of poverty and inequality. Do citizens condemn, condone, or simply acquiesce to the corrupt behavior of their politicians? Corruption and Politics in Latin America addresses these thorny questions, offering a fresh and timely approach to    More >

Corruption and Politics in Latin America: National and Regional Dynamics

Critical Perspectives on Derek Walcott

Robert D. Hamner, editor

Derek Walcott, winner of the 1992 Nobel Prize for literature, has risen from obscure colonial origins to lay claim to a rich cultural heritage. The progeny of Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas come together in his work as they populate his native Caribbean islands; his poetry and plays record their struggles to overcome the ironies of their lives, to establish their authentic "new    More >

Cuba and the United States: Will the Cold War in the Caribbean End?

Joseph S. Tulchin and Rafael Hernández, editors

Covering a wide range of issues involving Cuba and the United States—from an even wider range of perspectives—this book is the result of a Wilson Center conference convened to discuss the future of relations between the two countries. The contributors focus on the political dynamics in each country and consider how those dynamics might be affected by the rapidly shifting international    More >

Cuba Under Raúl Castro: Assessing the Reforms

Carmelo Mesa-Lago and Jorge Pérez-López

What led to the dramatic social and economic reforms introduced by Cuba's president Raúl Castro? How effective have those reforms been? And what obstacles does Castro face in overcoming the country's chronic socioeconomic woes? Cuba Under Raúl Castro addresses these questions, offering a comprehensive analysis of the president's efforts during his first six years in    More >

Cuba Under Raúl Castro: Assessing the Reforms

Cuba's Socialist Economy Today: Navigating Challenges and Change

Paolo Spadoni

What does Cuba's socialist economy look like today, after a half-century of fluctuating strategies? Are the reforms instituted by Raúl Castro improving living conditions and boosting production and efficiency? What challenges does the government face in crafting policies to address the country's most critical problems? Paolo Spadoni offers deeply informed answers to these questions    More >

Cuba's Socialist Economy Today: Navigating Challenges and Change

Cuba: The Contours of Change

Susan Kaufman Purcell and David J. Rothkopf, editors

Though few observers dispute that change is coming to Cuba, there is a notable lack of consensus regarding the pace and direction of that change. The authors of this collection offer a range of views on the growing political and economic challenges facing the Castro regime, how those challenges will be met, and Cuba's prospects for a peaceful transition to democracy. The book also includes two    More >

Cuba: The Contours of Change

Cultural Expression and Grassroots Development: Cases from Latin America and theCaribbean

Charles David Kleymeyer, editor

Arguing that a people's own cultural heritage is the foundation on which equitable and sustainable development can best be built, this book presents an innovative, culture-based approach to grassroots development in Latin America and the Caribbean. The approach seeks to retain a population's special cultural strengths and contributions while enabling them to achieve necessary changes in their    More >

Decentralizing Health Services in Mexico: A Case Study in State Reform

Núria Homedes and Antonio Ugalde, editors

Has Mexico, twenty years after beginning the process of decentralizing its health system, realized the anticipated benefits of increased community participation and improvements in efficiency and quality? Addressing this question, Decentralizing Health Services in Mexico presents a thorough historical and theoretical grounding, as well as representative case studies of decentralization at the    More >

Decentralizing Health Services in Mexico: A Case Study in State Reform

Dele's Child [a novel]

O.R. Dathorne

Guyana-born poet-novelist Dathorne’s powerful work, set against the background of a revolution, both political and spiritual, is a compelling account of the search for ancestry and legacy. The reader learns about the past, present, and future of the chief protagonists—Dele, the saintly whore; Pietro, the impotent medical practitioner; Ianty, the corrupt politician; and Stephan, who    More >

Democracy and Its Discontents in Latin America

Joe Foweraker and Dolores Trevizo, editors

Why is there so much discontent with democracy across Latin America? Are regimes being judged by unrealistic standards of success—or is there legitimate cause for criticism in light of  widespread failures to deliver either transparency or effective public policies? Addressing these questions across a variety of dimensions, the authors explore the diverse ways in which the specific    More >

Democracy and Its Discontents in Latin America

Democracy, Markets, and Structural Reform in Latin America: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico

William C. Smith, Carlos H. Acuña, and Eduardo A. Gamarra, editors

Severe political and economic problems challenge the civilian governments that have emerged in Latin America over the past decade. While achieving a degree of stability, these governments remain threatened by serious obstacles to the democratic process. This volume addresses the problematic relationship between neoliberal strategies of economic restructuring and the process of democratic    More >

Democratic Chile: The Politics and Policies of a Historic Coalition, 1990–2010

Kirsten Sehnbruch and Peter M. Siavelis, editors

How was Chile transformed both politically and economically during the two decades of center-left coalition (Concertación) government that followed the country's return to democracy in 1990? How did the coalition manage to hold on to power for so long—but not longer? And were its policies in fact substantially different from those that preceded them? Addressing these questions,    More >

Democratic Chile: The Politics and Policies of a Historic Coalition, 1990–2010

Democratization and Military Transformation in Argentina and Chile: Rethinking Rivalry

Kristina Mani

Is there a relationship between the consolidation of democracy and the ending of rivalries with neighboring states? Can internationalist foreign policies be useful in "reprogramming" militaries to accept civilian authority? Addressing these questions, Kristina Mani examines the dynamic connection between democracy building and security cooperation in Argentina and Chile in the 1990s. Her    More >

Democratization and Military Transformation in Argentina and Chile: Rethinking Rivalry

Desenvolvimento: Politics and Economy in Brazil

Wilber Albert Chaffee

The Brazilian economy has long been characterized by rapid growth—but equally by high inflation and an extreme maldistribution of wealth, despite the strong international reputation of the country's economists. Seeking to explain this, Chaffee links political interest with economic policy, showing how short-term political needs have dominated over long-term economic values. The book begins    More >

Developing Brazil: Overcoming the Failure of the Washington Consensus

Luiz Carlos Bresser-Pereira

After the 1994 Real Plan ended fourteen years of high inflation in Brazil, the country’s economy was expected—mistakenly—to grow quickly. Luiz Carlos Bresser-Pereira discusses Brazil’s economic trajectory from the mid-1990s to the present Lula administration, critically appraising the neoliberal reforms that have curtailed growth and proposing a national development    More >

Developing Brazil:  Overcoming the Failure of the Washington Consensus

Distant Cousins: The Caribbean-Latin American Relationship

Anthony T. Bryan and Andrés Serbin, editors

Profound cultural and political differences exist between Latin America and the Caribbean, despite their geographical proximity. Recent transformations in the global politico-economic system have brought about closer cooperation between the two areas, and this volume provides useful insights into their changing relationship. Contributors represent diverse academic backgrounds and provide a    More >

Driven by Drugs: US Policy Toward Colombia, 2nd Edition

Russell Crandall

In the years since the first edition of Driven by Drugs was published, there have been dramatic changes in US policy toward Colombia, as well as in domestic Colombian politics. This new edition traces developments in both arenas, bringing the story current through the administrations of George W. Bush and Álvaro Uribe.     More >

Driven by Drugs: US Policy Toward Colombia, 2nd Edition

Drug Trafficking Research in the Americas: An Annotated Bibliography

Bruce Michael Bagley, editor

This volume provides a guide to the ever expanding drug-related literature, concentrating on the most important, relevant sources chosen by a collection of scholars, analysts, and practitioners from a variety of disciplines. This multidisciplinary, multinational approach critically assesses the current social science literature on a complex and highly contentious issue in U.S.-Latin American    More >

Drugs and Democracy in Latin America: The Impact of U.S. Policy

Coletta A. Youngers and Eileen Rosin, editors

Although the US has spent more than $25 billion on international drug-control programs over the last two decades, it has failed to reduce the supply of cocaine and heroin entering the country. It has, however, succeeded in generating widespread, often profoundly damaging, consequences, most notably in Latin America and the Caribbean. The authors of Drugs and Democracy in Latin America offer a    More >

Drugs and Democracy in Latin America: The Impact of U.S. Policy

Economic Crisis and State Reform in Brazil: Toward a New Interpretation of Latin America

Luiz Carlos Bresser Pereira

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! This is a book about the economic crisis that took hold of Brazil and the rest of Latin America in the 1980s, its political consequences, and the economic reforms that were begun in the mid-'80s, but that remain incomplete a decade later. From his vantage point as both an academic economist and a political insider, Bresser Pereira explains    More >

Economic Development and Environmental Protection in Latin America

Joseph S. Tulchin and Andrew I. Rudman, editors

This collection of original pieces addresses the need to reconcile economic growth and environmental protection in Latin America. The contributors—among them scholars, government officials, and development practitioners—provide a theoretical and practical discussion of sustainable development practices, explore alternatives to deforestation, consider the pros and cons of    More >

Ecuador vs. Peru: Peacemaking Amid Rivalry

Monica Herz and João Pontes Nogueira

Although the 1995 Cenepa war between Ecuador and Peru was the first military conflict in South America in more than five decades, the Ecuador-Peru relationship might be characterized as one of enduring rivalry—punctuated by the threat of armed combat. In the context of this history of recurrent crises, Herz and Nogueira analyze the mediation process that followed the 1995 war.   The    More >

Ecuador vs. Peru: Peacemaking Amid Rivalry

Electoral Observation and Democratic Transitions in Latin America

Kevin J. Middlebrook, editor

What impact has electoral observation had on transitions to democracy in Latin America, and what direction should it take in the future? In addressing these and related questions, the contributors to this volume examine the evolution of electoral observation strategies since the 1980s, the relative contributions that foreign and domestic observers can make to free and fair elections and to the    More >

Elusive Reform: Democracy and the Rule of Law in Latin America

Mark Ungar

Elusive Reform explores one of the Latin American countries' biggest challenges: establishing a rule of law. Based on a close examination of historical patterns, it demonstrates how executive power and judicial disarray thwart progress toward judicial independence, state accountability, and citizen access to effective means of conflict resolution. Ungar critiques the wide spectrum of agencies    More >

Elusive Reform: Democracy and the Rule of Law in Latin America

Enabling Peace in Guatemala: The Story of MINUGUA

William Stanley

William Stanley tells the absorbing story of the UN peace operation in Guatemala's ten-year endeavor (1994-2004) to build conditions that would sustain a lasting peace in the country. Unusual among UN peace efforts because of its largely civilian nature, its General Assembly mandate, and its heavy reliance on UN volunteers to staff field offices, the mission (MINUGUA) focused initially on    More >

Enabling Peace in Guatemala: The Story of MINUGUA

Entrepreneurial Cuba: The Changing Policy Landscape

Archibald R.M. Ritter and Ted A. Henken

During the presidency of Raúl Castro, Cuba has dramatically reformed its policies toward small private enterprises. Archibald Ritter and Ted Henken consider why—and to what effect. After reviewing the evolution of policy since 1959, the authors contrast the approaches of Fidel and Raúl Castro and explore in depth the responses of Cuban entrepreneurs to the new environment.    More >

Entrepreneurial Cuba: The Changing Policy Landscape

Environment and Diplomacy in the Americas

Heraldo Muñoz, editor

The deterioration of the environment in the Americas exacts urgent and decisive action—a diagnosis shared by all 34 member countries of the Organization of American States. Consequently, in 1990 the OAS began a process of diplomatic debates oriented toward creating an inter-American system of nature conservation. This effort culminated at the June 1991 General Assembly in Santiago de Chile,    More >

Equity and Sustainable Development: Reflections from the U.S.-Mexico Border

Jane Clough-Riquelme and Nora Bringas Rábago, editors

  In light of the power strategies in play in the new geopolitics of economic and ecological globalization, there is a need for critical analysis of how the agenda of sustainable development is being conceived, shaped, and implemented. This volume considers issues of equity and development in the US-Mexico border regionand highlights the fact that regions at the juncture of the industrial    More >

Equity and Sustainable Development: Reflections from the U.S.-Mexico Border

Ethnopolitics in Ecuador: Indigenous Rights and the Strengthening of Democracy

Melina Selverston-Scher, with a foreword by Luis Macas

Ethnopolitics in Ecuador explores the rise of a vigorous contemporary indigenous movement in Ecuador, tracking the political and social transformations it has generated. Funding for bilingual literacy programs, participation in local and national politics after centuries of exclusion, and expanded protection for the rights of a growing number of self-identified members are among the movement's    More >

Ethnopolitics in Ecuador: Indigenous Rights and the Strengthening of Democracy

Export Growth in Latin America: Policies and Performance

Carla Macario, with Regis Bonelli, Adriaan ten Kate, and Gunnar Niels

Although Latin American and Caribbean countries have assigned a high priority to increasing exports in recent years—substantially transforming their economies in the process—export performance in most cases remains deficient. This book investigates why this is so, identifying the policies that determine successes and failures in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Mexico. Each country case    More >

Export Growth in Latin America: Policies and Performance

Faith in the Barrios: The Pentecostal Poor in Bogotá

Rebecca Pierce Bomann

The Pentecostal Poor offers a rich and powerful perspective on evangelicalism in the barrios of Latin America, exploring conversion and subsequent commitments to faith in an unstable environment of poverty and violence. Bomann’s study, based on extensive fieldwork, is unique in that it reveals the evangelical Protestant movement through the eyes of the believers themselves, as well as from    More >

Feeding the Market: South American Farmers, Trade and Globalization

Jon Hellin and Sophie Higman

Based on extensive fieldwork from the sweeping grasslands of Patagonia to the coffee farms of Ecuador, the authors illustrate the practical obstacles that farmers face in accessing markets, especially the difficulties of meeting market demands for large quantities of high quality produce in continuous supply. By focusing on eight different products—bananas, coffee, potatoes, coca, wine,    More >

Feeding the Market: South American Farmers, Trade and Globalization

Fernando Henrique Cardoso: Reinventing Democracy in Brazil

Ted G. Goertzel

Fernando Henrique Cardoso’s personal trajectory is unquestionably intertwined with the main intellectual and political debates in Brazil (and Latin America) in the second half of the twentieth century. Cardoso began his career struggling to apply Marxist ideas to political realities, and he continues to acknowledge the Marxist element that persists in his thinking. Nevertheless, since his    More >

Finally . . . Us: Contemporary Black Brazilian Women Writers

Miriam Alves, editor and translated by Carolyn Richardson Durham

This is the first time that the literary works of contemporary Afro-Brazilian women have been compiled presenting a comprehensive vision of what it means to be both black and female in Brazil. Though the canon of Brazilian literature is rich in Afro-Brazilian female characters, until recently it has included only a handful of Afro-Brazilian women writers, sprinkled across the centuries. The    More >

Forced Labor: Coercion and Exploitation in the Private Economy

Beate Andrees and Patrick Belser, editors

Two centuries after the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade, at least 12.3 million people are subjected to modern forms of forced labor—in rich countries, as well as poor ones. The authors of Forced Labor present state-of-the art research on the manifestations of these slavery-like practices, why they continue to survive, and how they can be eliminated. Their conceptually rich    More >

Forced Labor: Coercion and Exploitation in the Private Economy

Foreign Policy and Regionalism in the Americas

Gordon Mace and Jean-Philippe Thérien, editors

This comparative analysis of foreign policy behavior in the Americas focuses on the emerging trend toward regionalism. Following a discussion of the phenomenon of regionalism in general, chapters on the countries of North America, the Caribbean, and South America address three questions fundamental to the relationship between national foreign policy and hemispheric cooperation and integration:    More >

Four Generations of Norteños: New Research from the Cradle of Mexican Migration

Wayne A. Cornelius, David Scott FitzGerald, and Scott Borger, editors

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! Drawing on decades of fieldwork in a high-emigration town in central Mexico, as well as a thousand recent interviews, the authors chart the town's evolution from a source of short-term contract laborers during World War II to a present-day exporter of undocumented and legal migrants, many of whom now settle permanently in the US and have US-born children.    More >

Four Generations of Norteños: New Research from the Cradle of Mexican Migration

Generating Savings for Latin American Development

Robert Grosse, editor

How can savings be generated and mobilized to support Latin American development into the 21st century? This underlying question is analyzed in detail for the region and for several individual countries. The volume's authors examine the contribution of savings to the process of capital formation, the relationship between domestic savings and domestic investment, and the effects of foreign    More >

Global Restructuring, Employment, and Social Inequality in Urban Latin America

Richard Tardanico and Rafael Menjívar Larín, editors

Despite new opportunities arising from transformations in the global economic and political arenas in the 1990s, Latin American states have become more vulnerable to transnational capital movements and market shifts. Without the implementation of vigorous, innovative policies to promote social equality and upgrade national infrastructures, economic growth will yield widening inequalities both    More >

Globalization and the Rural Poor in Latin America

William M. Loker, editor

With global sociopolitical and economic change contributing to an accelerating crisis in Latin America’s rural communities, rural residents are responding creatively with a range of survival strategies: new forms of collective action, involvement in social movements, the development of resource-management programs, and participation in broader markets. The analyses and case studies in this    More >

Haiti's Predatory Republic: The Unending Transition to Democracy

Robert Fatton Jr.

The collapse of the Duvalier dictatorship in 1986 gave rise to optimism among Haitians in all walks of life—to hopes for a democratic journey leading to economic development, political renewal, and social peace. The reality of the subsequent years, however, has not been so sanguine. Robert Fatton analyzes the vicissitudes of politics in Haiti from the demise of Duvalier through the events of    More >

Haiti's Predatory Republic: The Unending Transition to Democracy

Haiti: Trapped in the Outer Periphery

Robert Fatton Jr.

The inability of the Haitian state to deal with the devastation of the January 2010 earthquake brought into sharp focus Haiti’s desperate social and economic conditions—and raised perplexing questions. What accounts for the country's continuing predicament? Why have repeated attempts at democratic governance failed so abysmally? And what role has the international community    More >

Haiti: Trapped in the Outer Periphery

Health Care Reform in Central America: NGO-Government Collaboration in Guatemala and El Salvador

Alberto José Frick Cardelle

Reflecting the trend of the state's diminishing role in Latin America, collaborative projects between nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and governments have emerged as important strategies for health reforms that increase the role of the private sector. Health Care Reform in Central America explores how health policies in El Salvador and Guatemala have created new types of NGOs and new forms of    More >

Health Care Reform in Central America: NGO-Government Collaboration in Guatemala and El Salvador

Impacts of Border Enforcement on Mexican Migration: The View from Sending Communities

Wayne A. Cornelius and Jessa M. Lewis, editors

This important book reveals how the stricter US border-control activities of the past decade have affected the behavior of migrants and potential migrants in rural Mexico. The authors establish direct links between changes in immigration-control policies and changes in the decision to migrate, choice of destination, mode of entry, and inclination to participate in a temporary worker program. They    More >

Impacts of Border Enforcement on Mexican Migration: The View from Sending Communities

Indigenous Mexican Migrants in the United States

Jonathan Fox and Gaspar Rivera-Salgado, editors

The multiple pasts and futures of the Mexican nation can be seen in the faces of the tens of thousands of indigenous people who each year set out on their voyages to the north, and of the many others who decide to settle in countless communities within the United States. This collection explores these migration processes and their social, cultural, and civic impacts in both the United States and    More >

Indigenous Mexican Migrants in the United States

Inside El Barrio: A Bottom-Up View of Neighborhood Life in Castro's Cuba

Henry Louis Taylor, Jr.

Henry Louis Taylor provides insight into the legacy of Fidel Castro by examining everyday life and culture in Havana's neighborhoods during El Período Especial (the Special Period), 1989-2006. Traversing those vibrant neighborhoods, Taylor discovered their importance not only in shaping the rhythms of daily life, but also in sustaining Castro's regime. The results of his    More >

Inside El Barrio: A Bottom-Up View of Neighborhood Life in Castro's Cuba

Institutional Adaptation and Innovation in Rural Mexico

Richard Snyder, editor

This volume explores the complex processes of institutional transformation that were unleashed in rural Mexico by the government's massive program of market-oriented economic reforms in the 1990s, creating new pressures for campesinos to make their production choices individually. Instead of paving the way for the triumph of free market forces, neoliberal reforms in rural Mexico tiggered a    More >

Insurrection and Revolution: Armed Struggle in Cuba, 1952-1959

Gladys Marel García-Pérez, with a Foreword by Louis Pérez

Based on previously untapped primary sources, this book examines the social forces that were released and shaped by the Cuban revolutionary war and, not least, the actions of real men and women attempting to forge a new future. García's focus on Matanzas province—an area highly representative of Cuba in demographics, racial patterns, economy, and education—allows a    More >

Insurrection and Revolution: Armed Struggle in Cuba, 1952-1959

International Policy Institutions Around the Pacific Rim: A Directory of Resources in East Asia, Australasia, and the Americas

Ramón Bahamonde

This major compendium identifies the approximately three hundred key institutional resources on international political and economic affairs available throughout the Pacific Basin—in East and Southeast Asia, Australia, Canada, the United States, Mexico, and the Pacific–oriented countries of South America. Organized by country/region, the Directory highlights each institution's    More >

Inventing Local Democracy: Grassroots Politics in Brazil

Rebecca Neaera Abers

Countless studies of citizen participation in public decisionmaking point out the limitations of direct democracy when it is transported from the realm of political theory into the "real world." In contrast, this book examines a case where an innovative city government gave major decisionmaking power to ordinary citizens on a large scale—and managed to survive and prosper. Since    More >

Inventing Local Democracy: Grassroots Politics in Brazil

Inventing North America: Canada, Mexico, and the United States

Guy Poitras

In the face of potent domestic and global forces, the U.S., Canada, and Mexico—the NA-3—have devised an enterprise that promises to draw them closer together in the twenty-first century. Inventing North America is an attempt to understand the NA-3's unique brand of regionalism within an increasingly globalized world. Poitras dissects the commonalities and differences among the    More >

Inventing North America: Canada, Mexico, and the United States

Is There a Transition to Democracy in El Salvador?

Joseph S. Tulchin, editor, with Gary Bland

This timely book explores to what degree democracy has taken root in El Salvador, and to what extent the country can strengthen democratic, civilian-controlled government institutions. The authors highlight a number of key questions: Does the electoral process allow for a fair and impartial reflection of the popular will? Is U.S. policy aiding the cause of democracy—or strengthening an    More >

Jorge Mas Canosa: En busca de una Cuba libre —Edición completa de sus discursos, entrevistas y declaraciones, 1962-1997 (Jorge Mas Canosa: In Search of a Free Cuba—The Complete Collection of Speeches, Interviews, and Statements, 1962-1997)

compiled by Rolando Bonachea, with a preface by Ambler Moss

This three-volume set presents in their entirety the speeches, interviews, and documents of the late Jorge Mas Canosa (1939-1997), political leader, activist, and founder of the Miami-based Cuban American National Foundation (CANF). Gathered from archives, newspapers, U.S. Congressional records, and other primary sources (including Mas Canosa family papers), these Spanish-language texts    More >

Kalman Silvert: Engaging Latin America, Building Democracy

Abraham F. Lowenthal and Martin Weinstein, editors

Kalman Silvert highlights the extraordinary career of an extraordinary man—one of the founding architects of Latin American studies in the United States, a major builder of the inter-American scholarly community, and an influential figure in US-Latin American relations. Thirteen distinguished Latin Americanists discuss Silvert's role as scholar, teacher, mentor, colleague, public    More >

Kalman Silvert: Engaging Latin America, Building Democracy

Key to an Enigma: British Sources Disprove British Claims to theFalkland/Malvinas

Angel M. Oliveri López

This unusual analysis of the Falkland/Malvinas dispute relies almost entirely on British sources to refute British claims to the islands. Oliveri López draws on official government documents, speeches, works of scholarship, and statements by residents of the islands themselves to substantiate his conclusion of "admission" by the U.K. of Argentine sovereignty over the Malvinas.    More >

Latin America in a Changing Global Environment

Riordan Roett and Guadalupe Paz, editors

Considering Latin America's emerging challenges and opportunities in the first decade of the twenty-first century, the authors examine key political, economic, and security concerns in the region. They focus both on the changing dynamics within the Western Hemisphere and on Latin America's evolving relationships with international actors and institutions.    More >

Latin America in a Changing Global Environment

Latin America in International Politics: Challenging US Hegemony

Joseph S. Tulchin

In recent years, the countries of Latin America have moved out from under the shadow of the United States to become active players in the international system. What changed? Why? And why did it take so long for that change to happen? To answer those questions, Joseph S. Tulchin explores the evolving role of Latin American states in world affairs from the early days of independence to the    More >

Latin America in International Politics: Challenging US Hegemony

Latin America in the New International System

Joseph S. Tulchin and Ralph H. Espach, editors

Placing Latin America in the context of debates on economic globalization and the dramatically changing nature of the international system, this volume offers the perspectives of scholars and policymakers from across the Americas. The authors argue that the ongoing diversification of economic and strategic ties presents Latin American nations with new options—and also with dangers. A    More >

Latin America in the New International System

Latin America in the Twenty-First Century: Toward a New Sociopolitical Matrix

Manuel Antonio Garretón, Marcelo Cavarozzi, Peter Cleaves, Gary Gereffi, and Jonathan Hartlyn

The myriad changes affecting contemporary Latin America in the context of a globalizing world are so far reaching, argue the authors of Latin America in the Twenty-First Century, that understanding them requires both new conceptual tools and multidisciplinary analysis. In response to this need, they explore developments in the region in terms of four central processes: the construction of    More >

Latin America in the Twenty-First Century: Toward a New Sociopolitical Matrix

Latin America's Economic Development: Confronting Crisis, 2nd Edition

James L. Dietz, editor

This revised edition of Latin America's Economic Development continues to provide a heterodox perspective on Latin America's economic problems, with institutional and neostructuralist views dominating. The selections richly convey that there are viable alternatives to the neoliberal approach dominating so much of policymaking, as well as academic debate, since the 1980s. The book    More >

Latin America: Perspectives on a Region

Jack W. Hopkins, editor

In the years since its original publication, Latin America: Perspectives on a Region has gained recognition as a well-written, comprehensive introductory text with an interdisciplinary approach to a politically volatile, culturally rich area. The six chapters in the book's first two sections lay a historical groundwork, covering environmental and social systems, pre-Colombian cultures and    More >

Latin America: Perspectives on a Region

Latin America’s Left Turns: Politics, Policies, and Trajectories of Change

Maxwell A. Cameron and Eric Hershberg, editors

This accessible look at Latin American politics explores how—and to what effect—diverse forces on the left have not only captured the imagination of vast swathes of the continent’s population, but also taken hold of the reins of government. The authors assess the multiple currents of Latin America's left turns, considering their origins, their relationships to political    More >

Latin America’s Left Turns: Politics, Policies, and Trajectories of Change

Latin American Democracies in the New Global Economy

Ana Margheritis, editor

The efforts of Latin America's democracies to grapple with the forces of the new global economy, and at the same time to undertake domestic restructuring, have been a frustrating tangle of opportunities and setbacks. This collection addresses those efforts, concentrating on the effects of changes toward more open economies in the context of improving living conditions and democratic    More >

Latin American Democracies in the New Global Economy

Latin American Political Economy in the Age of Neoliberal Reform: Theoretical and Comparative Perspectives for the 1990s

William C. Smith, Carlos H. Acuña, and Eduardo A. Gamarra, editors

In the wake of the failure of neoliberal strategies aimed at market-oriented restructuring to achieve external adjustment, tame hyperinflation, and discipline public sector finance. However, more people are now poorer with only marginal opportunities for equality, and a few people still hold most of the wealth and control productive resources. Frequently, governments have implemented new    More >

Legislatures and the New Democracies in Latin America

David Close, editor

Legislatures are indispensable parts of constitutional liberal democracies, controlling and criticizing the executive while voicing a wide range of opinions on public issues. This book examines the role of the legislature in the politics of democratic construction and consolidation in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, El Salvador, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Uruguay. Analyzing the status and daily operations    More >

Local Mexico: Democratic Transitions in an Authoritarian Context

Patricia Olney

Vicente Fox's 2000 election to the presidency in Mexico marked the end of more than 70 years of rule by the PRI, overturning what some observers referred to as "the perfect dictatorship." Since then, there has been much debate about the reasons for the PAN's successful challenge to decades of authoritarian rule. Patricia Olney makes a rich, nuanced contribution to that debate,    More >

Local Mexico: Democratic Transitions in an Authoritarian Context

Mainstreaming Microfinance: How Lending to the Poor Began, Grew, and Came of Age in Bolivia

Elisabeth Rhyne

Microcredit in Bolivia grew and became successful in only a decade, lifting an enormous segment of the country’s population into the financial mainstream in the process. The example of its high-achieving institutions charted a course for the development of the international microfinance field. In this gracefully written book, Elisabeth Rhyne brings the history of the microfinance movement to    More >

Mainstreaming Microfinance: How Lending to the Poor Began, Grew, and Came of Age in Bolivia

Making NAFTA Work: U.S. Firms and the New North American Business Environment

Stephen Blank and Jerry Haar

Blank and Haar examine how dynamic changes in the North American business environment, accelerated by NAFTA, have transformed corporate strategies and structures and affected patterns of U.S. investment in North America. Using a series of survey questionnaires and focused interviews with U.S. multinational-subsidiary executives in Mexico and Canada, the authors determine what firms hope to gain    More >

Manufacturing Insecurity: The Rise and Fall of Brazil's Military-Industrial Complex

Ken Conca

Manufacturing Insecurity provides a sobering analysis of an extraordinary boom and bust story: Nurtured by military rule and expanding international markets, Brazil's defense sector emerged as a Third World leader in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Within a decade, a country that had been almost totally dependent on outside suppliers became a significant manufacturer for the global market in    More >

Mayan Journeys: The New Migration from Yucatán to the United States

Wayne A. Cornelius, David Scott FitzGerald, and Pedro Lewin Fischer, editors

Yucatán, an impoverished state in southern Mexico, has recently emerged as a significant source of US-bound migrants. Why did this state's indigenous population wait so long to enter the migration stream, and how do their experiences differ from those of earlier more traditional migrants? Mayan Journeys explores how internal migration to southern Mexico's tourist resorts serves as    More >

Mayan Journeys: The New Migration from Yucatán to the United States

Meeting the Employment Challenge: Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico in the Global Economy

Janine Berg, Christoph Ernst, and Peter Auer

Arguing that economic policies in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico favor markets over institutions and the international economy over the domestic to the detriment of the workforce in those countries Meeting the Employment Challenge presents extensive evidence in support of placing employment concerns at the center of economic and social policies. The authors discuss the challenges the three    More >

Meeting the Employment Challenge: Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico in the Global Economy

Mercosur: Regional Integration, World Markets

Riordan Roett, editor

This timely volume describes the origins of Mercosur, South America’s dynamic and successful regional integration project, as well as the issues still to be tackled regarding the trade bloc’s expansion, the challenges to its transition from a customs union to the “Common Market of the South,” and its relations with other trade groups and countries (particularly the European    More >

Mexican Migration and the US Economic Crisis: A Transnational Perspective

Wayne A. Cornelius, David Scott FitzGerald, Pedro Lewin Fischer, and Leah Muse-Orlinoff, editors

In this follow-up to Mayan Journeys, drawing on responses to more than 1,000 surveys and some 500 hours of in-depth interviews in both the Yucatán and the US, the authors document the economic coping strategies of migrants and their families, how migrant workers navigate the US job market, and how health, education, and community participation are being shaped by the ongoing economic    More >

Mexican Migration and the US Economic Crisis: A Transnational Perspective

Mexico and the United States: The Politics of Partnership

Peter H. Smith and Andrew Selee, editors

What are the strengths and weaknesses of the partnership between Mexico and the United States? What might be done to improve it? Exploring both policy and process, and ranging from issues of trade and development to concerns about migration, the environment, and crime, the authors of Mexico and the United States provide a comprehensive analysis of one of the world’s most complex bilateral    More >

Mexico and the United States: The Politics of Partnership

Mexico in the Age of Democratic Revolutions, 1750-1850

Jaime E. Rodriguez O., editor

For a century beginning in the 1750s, Europe and the Americas underwent a series of profound political, economic, and social changes, ushering in the modern era. This book examines the experience of Mexico during that "age of democratic revolutions." Among the specific issues examined in the book are the policies of Jose de Galvez, political transformations in colonial Sonora and    More >

Mexico Under Fox

Luis Rubio and Susan Kaufman Purcell, editors

Mexico made a peaceful transition to democracy when it elected opposition candidate Vicente Fox president in July 2000—an event that has had a profound impact on the country's political system, its economic and social policy, and its international relationships. Mexico Under Fox examines the elements of continuity and change found in Mexico today.   The authors consider the    More >

Mexico Under Fox

Mexico's Democracy at Work: Political and Economic Dynamics

Russell Crandall, Guadalupe Paz, and Riordan Roett, editors

Painting a sober yet hopeful picture of current Mexican politics and economics, Mexico's Democracy at Work focuses on the country's still incomplete transformation from an authoritarian system, as well as the many challenges that exist within the new, more democratic context. The authors pay particular attention to both domestic and international economic dynamics and to Mexico's    More >

Mexico's Democracy at Work: Political and Economic Dynamics

Mexico's New Politics: The PAN and Democratic Change

David A. Shirk

Mexico's presidential elections in July 2000 brought victory to National Action Party (PAN) candidate Vicente Fox—and also the hope of democratic change after decades of single-party rule. Tracing the key themes and dynamics of a century of political development in Mexico, David Shirk explores the evolution of the party that ultimately became the vehicle for Fox's success. Shirk    More >

Mexico's New Politics: The PAN and Democratic Change

Mexico's Politics and Society in Transition

Joseph S. Tulchin and Andrew D. Selee, editors

As electoral politics in Mexico have become more open and democratic, the country's economy also has been thoroughly restructured and new ideas about government, state-society relations, and Mexico's place in the international system have taken hold. Mexico's Politics and Society in Transition explores these interrelated trends. Offering fresh perspectives on the contemporary problems on the    More >

Mexico's Politics and Society in Transition

Mexico's Private Sector: Recent History, Future Challenges

Riordan Roett, editor

Mexico’s private sector continues to confront challenges imposed not only by reforms in the country’s economic and political systems, but also by demands of the international economic community for transparent and fair business dealings. In this book, scholars and business leaders examine the responses to these challenges, weighing the goals of economic reform against its results,    More >

Mexico’s Left: The Paradox of the PRD

Dag Mossige

Why has Mexico's political left been in such turmoil since the dramatic 2006 election? What explains the contentious relationship between the country's largest left-wing party, the PRD, and its former presidential candidate Andrés Manuel López Obrador? Is the PRD in fact a political party, or instead a much looser political movement? Dag Mossige provides an insightful    More >

Mexico’s Left: The Paradox of the PRD

Migration from the Mexican Mixteca: A Transnational Community in Oaxaca and California

Wayne A. Cornelius, David Scott FitzGerald, Jorge Hernández-Díaz, and Scott Borger, editors

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! This volume provides a vivid portrait of a transnational migrant community anchored in both the remote Mixteca region of Oaxaca and the San Diego metropolitan area. Drawing on surveys and interviews with migrants and potential migrants conducted by a binational research team in 2007-2008, the contributors show how the Oaxaca-based and the California-based    More >

Migration from the Mexican Mixteca:  A Transnational Community in Oaxaca and California

Mobilizing for Human Rights in Latin America

Edward Cleary

In this follow-up to his widely read The Struggle for Human Rights in Latin America, Edward Cleary examines some of the robust human rights movements of the past two decades.    More >

Mobilizing for Human Rights in Latin America

Monsieur Toussaint: A Play

Edouard Glissant, translated by J. Michael Dash and Edouard Glissant

Edouard Glissant's Monsieur Toussaint tells the tragic story of Toussaint L'Ouverture, the charismatic leader of the revolution—the only successful slave revolt in history—that led to Haiti's independence more than two hundred years ago.   Translated by J. Michael Dash in collaboration with the author, this new edition captures the striking essence of the original    More >

Monsieur Toussaint: A Play

Myths and [Mis]Perceptions: Changing U.S. Elite Visions of Mexico

Sergio Aguayo Quezada

Weaving together the influences of the media, academia, government, and society at large, Aguayo traces the evolution of U.S. perceptions toward Mexico and outlines how changing U.S. views have affected events in Mexico and the bilateral relationship itself. This meticulously crafted study of the intersection of perceptions, ideas, and consciousness in international relations constitutes nothing    More >

NAFTA Stories: Fears and Hopes in Mexico and the United States

Ann E. Kingsolver

Ann Kingsolver presents stories people have told about NAFTA—young people and old, urban and rural, with differing political perspectives, occupations, and other markers of identity—that demonstrate their expectations and imaginations of the sweeping trade agreement. NAFTA, Kingsolver contends, both before and after its passage, became a catch-all in public discourse for tensions    More >

NAFTA Stories: Fears and Hopes in Mexico and the United States

Negotiating Democracy in Brazil: The Politics of Exclusion

Bernd Reiter

Do societal inequalities limit the effectiveness of democratic regimes? And if so, why? And how? Addressing this question, Bernd Reiter focuses on the role of societal dynamics in undermining democracy in Brazil. Reiter explores the ways in which race, class, and gender in Brazil structure a society that is deeply divided between the included and the excluded—and where much of the    More >

Negotiating Democracy in Brazil: The Politics of Exclusion

Negotiating Extra-Territorial Citizenship: Mexican Migration and the Transnational Politics of Community

David Scott FitzGerald

The dominant nation-state model of citizenship, in which political identity and state territory are congruent, is increasingly unable to resolve the contradictions created by global mass migration. Fitzgerald's careful ethnographic fieldwork in Michoacán, Mexico, and Southern California supports a process-based model of extra-territorial citizenship, in which migrants claim citizenship    More >

Nicaragua: Navigating the Politics of Democracy

David Close

Since the 1970s, Nicaragua has experienced four major regime changes—shifts in its fundamental logic, structure, and operational code of governance. What accounts for such instability? Have other states that transitioned to democracy followed a similar path? Considering these questions, David Close explores the dynamics of Nicaragua's movements toward and away from democracy since    More >

Nicaragua: Navigating the Politics of Democracy

Nicaragua: The Chamorro Years

David Close

In 1990, Nicaraguans voted out the revolutionary Sandinista regime and replaced it with the conservative government of President Violeta Chamorro. Chamorro's term of office was marked by constitutional, economic, partisan, and social conflict, as her administration attempted to replace the revolutionary system with representative government and market economics. Close examines these conflicts    More >

Organized Business, Economic Change, and Democracy in Latin America

Francisco Durand and Eduardo Silva, editors

Sweeping changes in many Latin American nations have transformed business elites into key political and economic players. While organized business has become increasingly visible in the past decade, its role has been understudied. This volume analyzes the extent to which economic and political changes have convinced business elites to strengthen their employer associations and to use    More >

Party Politics and the Struggle for Democracy in Mexico

Kevin J. Middlebrook, editor

The contributors assess the role of the center-right National Action Party (PAN) in Mexico's transition to a democratic regime. A wave of local- and state-level PAN victories rolled over Mexico during the 1980s and 1990s as the party attracted prominent businessmen onto its candidate slates. Their successes paved the way for the July 2000 election of Vicente Fox, whose defeat of the PRI candidate    More >

Party Politics and the Struggle for Democracy in Mexico

Peacemaking and Democratization in the Western Hemisphere

Tommie Sue Montgomery, editor

This is the first comprehensive study of the multilateral political, electoral, and military peacemaking and peace-building missions in Latin America and the Caribbean. The authors cover electoral-observation missions in Nicaragua, El Salvador, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and Mexico, as well as diplomatic/military missions in Nicaragua and along the Peru-Ecuador border. Also included are essays    More >

Peddling Paradise: The Politics of Tourism in Latin America

Kirk S. Bowman

With tourism lauded throughout Latin America as a sure engine of economic growth, actual performance in the sector has varied to an extreme degree. Kirk Bowman asks why. Why did states become so actively involved in the tourism sector even as they were reducing their role in other sectors of the economy? Why have destinations with similar endowments differed so greatly in their success in    More >

Peddling Paradise: The Politics of Tourism in Latin America

Peru's APRA: Parties, Politics, and the Elusive Quest for Democracy

Carol Graham

When Peru's APRA—one of the oldest and most controversial political parties in Latin America—came to power in 1985, expectations were high for the new government, in part because a decade of economic decline and social crisis had discredited both the military and the right as alternatives. APRA did manage to maintain an unprecedented consensus for two years. But a sudden shift in    More >

Polarizing Mexico: The Impact of Liberalization Strategy

Enrique Dussel Peters

Since the end of the 1980s, structural changes have profoundly altered Mexico's economy and society. But has the outcome been a positive one? Dussel Peters argues that liberalization strategy in Mexico has been successful in achieving its stated, short-term aims. But in looking at fundamental issues of employment and income distribution, foreign trade, and industrial    More >

Polarizing Mexico: The Impact of Liberalization Strategy

Policing Protest in Argentina and Chile

Michelle D. Bonner

Winner of the Canadian Political Science Association’s Prize in Comparative Politics, 2016! Despite the pervasiveness of electoral democracy in Latin America, the police continue to repress political protests. Why? Does the majority of the public support the repression of protests? If not, whom do they hold accountable, and how? Michelle Bonner offers a new perspective on police reform    More >

Policing Protest in Argentina and Chile

Political Corruption in Mexico: The Impact of Democratization

Stephen D. Morris

Has the fundamental shift in Mexico's political system away from single-party authoritarian rule had any impact on the pattern of corruption that has plagued the country for years? Is there less or more corruption today? Have different types of corruption emerged? If so, why? Stephen Morris addresses these questions, comprehensively exploring how the changes of  the past    More >

Political Corruption in Mexico: The Impact of Democratization

Political Leadership in Zapatista Mexico: Marcos, Celebrity, and Charismatic Authority

Daniela di Piramo

Can charismatic authority be used to further progressive politics without simultaneously doing damage? Is it possible for a movement with a charismatic leader to achieve an egalitarian society? Tracing the history of Mexico's Zapatista movement and the emergence of its controversial masked spokesman, Subcommandante Marcos, Daniela di Piramo investigates the implications of these    More >

Political Leadership in Zapatista Mexico: Marcos, Celebrity, and Charismatic Authority

Political Learning and Redemocratization in Latin America: Do Politicians Learn from Political Crises?

Jennifer L. McCoy, editor

Intrigued with the question of how societies adopt norms, institutions, and rules associated with liberal democracy, the contributors to this volume examine how political actors in Latin America reorient their behavior and attitudes to support, adapt, or acquiesce to democracy. The authors offer case studies of change in political parties in Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, and Venezuela—countries    More >

Political Learning and Redemocratization in Latin America: Do Politicians Learn from Political Crises?

Politicians and Politics in Latin America

Manuel Alcántara Sáez, editor

The premise of this book is, simply, that politicians matter—that an understanding of the role played by politicians in the way that politics is carried out in their countries is, far from constituting a resurrection of outdated elitist theories, of vital importance in present-day Latin America. The authors consider politicians as both cause and effect. Drawing on pioneering field research    More >

Politicians and Politics in Latin America

Politics of Illusion: The Bay of Pigs Invasion Reexamined

James G. Blight and Peter Kornbluh, editors

The defeat of the attempted April 1961 invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs (Playa Giron) was one of the worst foreign–policy disasters in U.S. history. Since then, explanations of the event have emphasized betrayal by one U.S. agency or another, seeking to assign blame for the "loss" of Cuba. With the benefit of new documentation, however—from U.S. government and Cuban exile    More >

Politics, Religion, and Society in Latin America

Daniel H. Levine

Long assumed to be an unchanging and unquestioned bulwark of established power and privilege, religion in Latin America has diversified and flourished, while taking on new social and political roles in more open societies. How did this change occur? Why did churches in the region embrace new ideas about rights, sponsor social movements, and become advocates for democracy? Are further changes on    More >

Politics, Religion, and Society in Latin America

Polity: Demystifying Democracy in Latin America and Beyond

Joe Foweraker

Amidst the many lamentations about the problems of democracy, Joe Foweraker turns his attention to specific questions: Is democracy incompatible with stark social inequalities? Why are so many democratic governments deemed unaccountable and beset by populist pressures? Perhaps most fundamentally, why does democratic theory have no answers to these questions? Foweraker argues that finding    More >

Polity: Demystifying Democracy in Latin America and Beyond

Popular Movements and Political Change in Mexico

Joe Foweraker and Ann L. Craig, editors

In just twenty years, popular movements have changed the face of Mexican politics, as organized groups of peasants, teachers, city dwellers, women, and students have crowded into the political arena to pose new challenges to the old order of political cooptation and control. Assessing the overall political significance of this effervescence, the contributors to this book focus on the interactions    More >

Poverty and Development in Latin America: Public Policies and Development Pathways

Henry Veltmeyer and Darcy Tetreault, editors

Why, despite some five decades of international development efforts, is poverty still so widespread in Latin America? More specifically, what are the root causes of poverty? How can it be overcome? What meaningful progress has resulted from the "war against poverty"? Through a critical analysis of public policies and development pathways, the authors of Poverty and Development in Latin    More >

Poverty and Development in Latin America: Public Policies and Development Pathways

Prologue to Revolution: Cuba, 1898-1958

Jorge Ibarra, translated by Marjorie Moore

This landmark study traces economic development, social dynamics, and political processes in Cuba from the end of Spanish colonial rule to the triumph of the 1959 revolution. Ibarra explores the complex and compelling relationship between North American capital investment and the formation—and deformation—of Cuba's national institutions. Focusing especially on class structures, gender    More >

Protecting a Sacred Gift: Water and Social Change in Mexico

Scott Whiteford and Roberto Melville, editors

Protecting a Sacred Gift makes a strong case that culture, gender, place, politics, and history all shape Mexico's water resources policy, management strategies, and ultimately, its physical and cultural landscapes. This edited volume presents diverse disciplinary approaches—anthropology, development stduies, geography, history, political science, sociology, and women's studies—all of    More >

Protecting a Sacred Gift: Water and Social Change in Mexico

Puerto Rican Government and Politics: A Comprehensive Bibliography

Edgardo Meléndez

The first of its kind, this major bibliography covers all aspects of Puerto Rican government and politics defined in the broadest manner. More than 5,000 entries identify books, articles, and reports not only on such traditional subjects as political parties and government institutions, but also dealing with culture and identity, gender, race relations, economic issues, the media and politics, and    More >

Puerto Rico: Negotiating Development and Change

James L. Dietz

In the midst of significantly changing economic and political relations with the United States, Puerto Rico is struggling to find a new—and effective—development path. James Dietz examines the island's contemporary development trajectory, providing a comprehensive and up-to-date analysis.   Dietz considers where Puerto Rico's economy is today, why, and how its    More >

Puerto Rico: Negotiating Development and Change

Race, Ethnicity, and Power in Ecuador: The Manipulation of Mestizaje

Karem Roitman

How do today's Latin American elites understand and relate to ideas of power, race, ethnicity, and mestizaje? And what impact does that understanding have on the dynamics of socioeconomic development in ethnically mixed societies? Focusing on the case of Ecuador—a country struggling to recast its mestizo identity in the aftermath of dramatic indigenous uprisings—Karem Roitman    More >

Race, Ethnicity, and Power in Ecuador: The Manipulation of Mestizaje

Recession Without Borders: Mexican Migrants Confront the Economic Downturn

David Scott FitzGerald, Rafael Alarcón, and Leah Muse-Orlinoff, editors

How has the current US economic crisis affected Mexicans on both sides of the border? This volume answers that question, drawing on a 2010 study of the migrant source community of Tlacuitapa, Jalisco, and its satellite communities in Oklahoma City and the San Francisco Bay Area. A survey of 830 adults and scores of in-depth interviews yield a rich picture of not only how migrants and their    More >

Recession Without Borders: Mexican Migrants Confront the Economic Downturn

Recycling Dictators in Latin American Elections: Legacies of Military Rule

Brett J. Kyle

What explains the presence—and the surprising performance—of former authoritarian-regime officials in Latin American presidential elections? To answer that question, Brett J. Kyle examines the experiences of twelve countries that transitioned from military to civilian government in the Third Wave of democratization. His persuasive analysis, incorporating case studies of Chile,    More >

Recycling Dictators in Latin American Elections: Legacies of Military Rule

Redefining Mexican "Security": Society, State, and Region Under NAFTA

James F. Rochlin

This pioneering effort to conceptualize unforeseen—and nontraditional—security issues in Mexico confronts what went unaddressed in virtually the entire debate surrounding the NAFTA negotiations: the process of redefining security in Mexico within the context of increased economic integration with the U.S. and Canada. Grappling with the question of what "security" means in    More >

Reforming the State: Managerial Public Administration in Latin America

Luiz Carlos Bresser Pereira and Peter Spink, editors

Neoconservative proposals for a minimal state notwithstanding, it has become increasingly clear in Latin America (and elsewhere) that the state must in fact be strengthened and the civil service reformed. This book contributes to the debate about the optimum role of the state, advancing the managerial approach to improving state capacity as far more effective than the bureaucratic    More >

Regulation and the Informal Economy: Microenterprises in Chile, Ecuador, and Jamaica

edited by Victor E. Tokman and Emilio Klein

The extent to which the regulatory environment in developing countries influences the characteristics and growth potential of the urban informal sector is an issue much debated today, in large part because of its strong association with policy measures. Of particular concern is the effect of regulations on microenterprises, in terms of both "start up" and the capacity for expansion. This    More >

Regulatory Policy in Latin America: Post-Privatization Realities

Luigi Manzetti, editor

Privatization policies have swept most of Latin America in recent years, but very little attention has been paid so far to the consequences that the withdrawal of the state in strategic economic sectors is going to entail. The fact that public utilities and financial services are now in private hands makes it imperative that the state redefine its role from that of an entrepreneur to one of an    More >

Rethinking Corporate Social Engagement: Lessons From Latin America

Lester M. Salamon

Lester Salamon assesses the reality behind the "corporate social engagement" hype in Latin America, examining what forms CSE is taking, how it is being implemented, why businesses chose to participate, variations among countries in their approaches to partnerships between businesses and civil society, and whether CSE has had any positive impact. His brief, accessible book shows how civil    More >

Rethinking Corporate Social Engagement: Lessons From Latin America

Rethinking Venezuelan Politics: Class, Conflict, and the Chavez Phenomenon

Steve Ellner

In this fresh look at Venezuelan politics, Steve Ellner emphasizes the central significance of the country's economic and social cleavages. Ellner's journey through modern Venezuelan history—observing popular masses and social actors as much as political elites and formal institutions—fundamentally informs his analysis of Hugo Chávez's presidency and the    More >

Rethinking Venezuelan Politics: Class, Conflict, and the Chavez Phenomenon

Rural Progress, Rural Decay: Neoliberal Adjustment Policies and Local Initiatives

Liisa L. North and John D. Cameron, editors

How do rural development programs, especially those run by nongovernmental organizations, cope in a time of structural adjustment programs and economical liberalization? Using Ecuador as a representative example, the authors of Rural Progress, Rural Decay explore the consequences of neoliberal macroeconomic policies for equitable development—and demonstrate that NGOs can make little headway    More >

Rural Progress, Rural Decay: Neoliberal Adjustment Policies and Local Initiatives

Schools in the Forest: How Grassroots Education Brought Political Empowerment to the Brazilian Amazon

Denis Lynn Daly Heyck

Drawing on the experience of  Projecto Seringueiro (Project Rubber Tapper), Denis Heyck reveals how a radical education experiment designed simply to bring literacy to rubber tappers in the Amazon rainforests helped the members of a threatened community to claim their political rights and preserve their cultural heritage in the face of ferocious opposition. The rubber tappers' story shows    More >

Schools in the Forest: How Grassroots Education Brought Political Empowerment to the Brazilian Amazon

Security Cooperation in the Western Hemisphere: Resolving the Ecuador-Peru Conflict

Gabriel Marcella and Richard Downes, editors

Reaching an enduring solution to the historic dispute between Ecuador and Peru is no small challenge: two centuries of disagreements have spawned a culture that intimidates those favoring lasting peace. This volume provides analyses of the historical, political, diplomatic, military, and international dimensions of the search for peace in the aftermath of the two nations' 1995    More >

Security in South America: The Role of States and Regional Organizations

Rodrigo Tavares

What types of threats and conflicts affect the countries of South America? What roles can and should states and regional organizations play in maintaining both traditional and human security in the region? Ranging from armed conflicts, terrorism, and the arms trade to political crises, drug trafficking, and environmental concerns, Rodrigo Tavares provides a comprehensive discussion of the issues    More >

Security in South America: The Role of States and Regional Organizations

Security in the Caribbean Basin: The Challenge of Regional Cooperation

Joseph S. Tulchin and Ralph H. Espach, editors

Since the end of the Cold War, the security environment of the Caribbean Basin has dramatically changed from the containment of communism to a series of transnational threats—drug trafficking, migratory flows, economic crises, natural disasters—that demand cooperative, multilateral policies. This in turn, argue the authors of Security in the Caribbean Basin, calls for a redefinition of    More >

Security, Democracy, and Development in U.S.-Latin American Relations

Lars Schoultz, William C. Smith, and Augusto Varas, editors

The end of the Cold War coincides with profound transformations in global geopolitics, and the nations of the Western Hemisphere must now adjust to new strategic conditions that have altered the meaning of the inter-American system. The very concept of "Latin America" is undergoing a redefinition, as the economies of the United States, Canada, Mexico, and, in the future, of some of the    More >

Snowfields: The War on Cocaine in the Andes

Clare Hargreaves

Unlike previous books on the cocaine trade, which examine the problem through Western eyes, Snowfields looks at the drug business through the eyes of the main players in Bolivia, where the white powder is made. In this compelling account, Clare Hargreaves draws from scores of interviews with drug barons who rule over vast empires, dirt-poor coca farms, addicts, traffickers, the military,    More >

Snowfields: The War on Cocaine in the Andes

Social Development in Latin America: The Politics of Reform

Joseph S. Tulchin and Allison M. Garland, editors

While previous analyses of public-sector reform efforts in Latin America have focused largely on strategies to redefine the role of the state in the economy, there is a growing realization that social reform—addressing such issues as poverty, inequality, and unemployment—is a condition on which economic and political stability rest. This volume provides a wide-ranging analysis of    More >

Social Development in Latin America: The Politics of Reform

Soviet-Cuban Alliance: 1959-1991

Yuri Pavlov

During the Cuban Missle Crisis in 1962, Yuri Pavlov interpreted for Nikita Khrushchev. In 1982, he was appointed Soviet Ambassador to Costa Rica, and in 1987, he became head of the Foreign Ministry's Latin American Directorate and was responsible for Soviet-Cuban bilateral relations. Pavlov draws upon these experiences to give both a personal and a political account of the history of the    More >

Strategies for Resource Management, Production, and Marketing in Rural Mexico

Guadalupe Rodríguez Gómez and Richard Snyder, editors

The authors explore the varied strategies for resource management, production, and marketing that Mexico's campesinos have pursued in response to the dramatic changes in rural Mexico in the 1990s. A program of market-oriented economic reforms resulted in the dismantling of state-owned enterprises and the withdrawal of government subsidies from the countryside. A constitutional amendment permitted    More >

Strategy and Security in U.S.-Mexican Relations Beyond the Cold War

John Bailey and Sergio Aguayo, editors

Drug trafficking, transnational organized crime, terrorism, regional conflicts, failed states, controlled flows of refugees, and the rise of regional economic blocs have led Mexico and the United States to reconsider their strategic and security interests. The contributors examine possible sources of future bilateral conflicts and the appropriateness of bilateral/multilateral resoultion of    More >

Struggles for Local Democracy in the Andes

John Cameron

John Cameron draws on power-based approaches to the study of democratization as he thoughtfully explores efforts by indigenous and peasant groups to gain control of local governments and deepen democracy in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru. Cameron addresses three fundamental questions: What factors best explain the success or failure of local political movements in the Andes? What forms of    More >

Struggles for Local Democracy in the Andes

Subnational Politics and Democratization in Mexico

Wayne A. Cornelius, Todd A. Eisenstadt, and Jane Hindley, editors

This volume highlights the growing disjuncture between Mexico's recently accelerated transition to democracy at the national level and what is occurring at the state and local levels in many parts of the country. Subnational political regimes controlled by hard-line antidemocratic elements linked to the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) remain important in late-twentieth-century Mexico,    More >

Tectonic Shifts: Haiti Since the Earthquake

Mark Schuller and Pablo Morales, editors

Tectonic Shifts offers compelling on-the-ground perspectives on the aftermath of Haiti's cataclysmic earthquake. Following a critical analysis of the country's heightened vulnerability as a result of centuries of underdevelopment and misguided foreign aid interventions, the authors address a range of contemporary realities, foreign impositions, and political changes in the relief and    More >

Tectonic Shifts: Haiti Since the Earthquake

The Americas in Transition: The Contours of Regionalism

Gordon Mace, Louis Bélanger, and contributors

The FTA, MERCOSUR, the Enterprise for the Americas Initiative, NAFTA, the Summit of the Americas—do these constitute building blocs in the construction of a new regional system? This book explores that question, offering an assessment of the state of regionalism in the Americas. The authors first outline the regionalist project—which they view as essentially a U.S.    More >

The Andes in Focus: Security, Democracy, and Economic Reform

Russell Crandall, Guadalupe Paz, and Riordan Roett, editors

How can a region roiled by political strife, civil war, illicit drug trafficking, and dismal economic performance achieve political stability and support economic growth? The Andes in Focus addresses this question with an in-depth look at the complex factors underlying the ongoing volatile situation. The authors offer detailed analyses of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela, as well    More >

The Andes in Focus: Security, Democracy, and Economic Reform

The Brazilian Economy: Growth and Development, 7th edition

Werner Baer

In this thorough description and analysis of Latin America's largest economy, Werner Baer traces the trajectory of Brazil's economic development and performance from the colonial period through the early years (2011-2012) of the administration of Dilma Rousseff. In addition to updated information, the seventh edition includes entirely new chapters on the challenges and accomplishments    More >

The Brazilian Economy: Growth and Development, 7th edition

The Caribbean in the Pacific Century: Prospects for Caribbean-PacificCooperation

Jacqueline A. Braveboy-Wagner, with W. Marvin Will, Dennis J. Gayle, and Ivelaw Griffith

Despite the current global focus on prospects for the integrated European market, there are many in the policymaking and business communities who believe that the next century will be a Pacific, rather than a European, one. Not only does U.S. trade with East Asia far exceed its trans-Atlantic commerce, but recent figures show that the countries of Asia Pacific account for more than 40 percent of    More >

The Challenge of Change in Latin America and the Caribbean

Jeffrey Stark, editor

The nations of Latin America and the Caribbean experienced far-reaching change in the decade of the 1990s, as the region's democracies shifted toward new economic models based on increased openness and market principles. Addressing the challenges that subsequently emerged, this collection explores issues ranging from globalization, democratization, and economic change, to the environment and    More >

The Challenge of Change in Latin America and the Caribbean

The Challenge of Institutional Reform in Mexico

Riordan Roett, editor

The Salinas administration's reforms in Mexico generated both widespread attention and a host of questions. This book addresses those questions, examining the impact of the recent reforms on the state's relations with key social and political actors—labor, the peasantry, business, political parties, and the church—and assessing reform initiatives in the areas of education, human    More >

The Changing Currents of Transpacific Integration: China, the TPP, and Beyond

Adrian H. Hearn and Margaret Myers, editors

This comprehensive assessment of transpacific economic integration explores the many ways that new approaches to multilateral cooperation, and notably the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), are transforming the regional landscape. Reflecting diverse views on the merits of new and wide-ranging agreements, the authors consider: To what extent will the TPP facilitate the US "pivot" to Asia    More >

The Changing Currents of Transpacific Integration: China, the TPP, and Beyond

The Cuban Way: Capitalism, Communism, and Confrontation

Ana Julia Jatar-Hausmann

Combining historical narrative, statistics, and stories of survival behaviors in everyday life, Ana Jatar-Hausmann offers an analysis of economic policies and trends in socialist Cuba at the end of the twentieth century. Her work, incorporating the results of personal interviews with government officials, academics, and average citizens, uniquely illustrates the complexities and dilemmas of a    More >

The Cuban Way: Capitalism, Communism, and Confrontation

The Ecopolitics of Development in the Third World

Robert P. Guimarães

Choice Outstanding Academic Book Honorable Mention, 1992 Sprout Award Equally a study of the ecological foundations of political systems and a detailed analysis of how a particular Third World political system, Brazil's, addresses environmental issues, this unusually engaging book explores the institutional and political dimensions of environmental problems in developing countries. Roberto    More >

The Future Role of the Ejido in Rural Mexico

Richard Snyder and Gabriel Torres, editors

This volume explores how recent reforms to Mexico's agrarian legislation changed the ejido's traditional role as the principal economic and political agent in the countryside. Based on field studies in Chiapas, Jalisco, Oaxaca, and Yucatán, the authors demonstrate how variations in historical contexts and local sociocultural conditions have had a major impact on the efficacy of agrarian    More >

The Human Farm: A Tale of Changing Lives and Changing Lands

Katie Smith

Katie Smith tells the unforgettable story of a group of Honduran peasants who—as they learn to renew their fields and enhance their harvests—also learn lessons that renew their hopes and lead to a new sense of community. Smith's engaging and enlightening narrative follows the peasants as, under the leadership of the inspirational José Elías Sánchez, they carve    More >

The Human Farm: A Tale of Changing Lives and Changing Lands

The Impact of Privatization in the Americas

Melissa H. Birch and Jerry Haar, editors

Privatization, the centerpiece of neoliberal reform policies, reflects the preeminent role of market forces and the diminished role of the state in Latin America's political economy. While it is far too early to evaluate privatization's long-term performance in achieving the objectives of reform, this volume assesses its initial effects and suggests directions for future change. Eight country    More >

The Jews of Latin America, 3rd Edition

Judith Laikin Elkin

When it was first published in 1980, Judith Laikin Elkin's foundational book on the Jewish communities of Latin America quickly became the standard resource on the topic. This new edition, the first in fifteen years, brings the story up-to-date, incorporating the events of recent decades and reflecting new insights provoked by the changing political, cultural, and economic conditions    More >

The Jews of Latin America, 3rd Edition

The Multilateral Development Banks: Volume 3, The Caribbean Development Bank

Chandra Hardy

The multilateral banks are powerful forces in the international community, providing loans of more than $250 billion to developing countries over the last half-century. The best-known of these, the World Bank, has been studied extensively, but the "regional development banks" are little understood, even within their own geographic regions. This book looks specifically at the policies    More >

The Multilateral Development Banks: Volume 4, the Inter-American Development Bank

Diana Tussie

The multilateral banks are powerful forces in the international community, providing loans of more than $250 billion to developing countries over the last half-century. The best-known of these, the World Bank, has been studied extensively, but the "regional development banks" are little understood, even within their own geographic regions. This book looks specifically at the policies    More >

The Paradox of the Mexican State: Rereading Sovereignty from Independence toNAFTA

Julie A. Erfani

Exploring the contradictory nature of Mexican statehood, Erfani explains how a weak national state became a symbol of great domestic strength and, although failing in its domestic economic endeavors, supported a long and stable political regime. Erfani focuses on the concept of sovereignty as not only a legal status, but also a political myth. She traces the struggles of Mexico's federal    More >

The Pinochet Regime

Carlos Huneeus, translated from the Spanish by Lake Sagaris

This seminal book was inspired by a series of questions: What explains the endurance of Augusto Pinochet's authoritarian regime in Chile, a country with a lengthy democratic tradition? What mechanisms secured the regime's political stability and broad-based support? What role did neoliberal ideas play in authoritarian discourse and policy? How could two such opposite forces as political    More >

The Pinochet Regime

The Political Construction of Brazil: Society, Economy, and State Since Independence

Luiz Carlos Bresser-Pereira

Spanning the period from the country’s independence in 1822 through mid-2016, Luiz Carlos Bresser-Pereira assesses the trajectory of Brazil's political, social, and economic development. Bresser-Pereira draws on his decades of first-hand experience to shed light on the many paradoxes that have characterized Brazil's polity, its society, and the relations between the two across nearly    More >

The Political Construction of Brazil: Society, Economy, and State Since Independence

The Politics of Crime in Mexico: Democratic Governance in a Security Trap

John Bailey

What kind of democracy will emerge in Mexico when the current levels of violence are brought under control? Will democratic reformers gain strength in the new equilibrium between government and criminal organizations? Or will corruption tilt the balance toward criminal interests? In the context of these questions, John Bailey explores the "security trap" in which Mexico is currently    More >

The Politics of Crime in Mexico: Democratic Governance in a Security Trap

The Politics of English in Puerto Rico’s Public Schools

Jorge R. Schmidt

How have colonial and partisan politics in Puerto Rico affected the language used in public schools? What can we learn from the conflict over the place of English in Puerto Rican society? How has the role of English evolved over time? Addressing these questions, Jorge Schmidt incisively explores the complex relationships among politics, language, and education in Puerto Rico from 1898, when Spain    More >

The Politics of English in Puerto Rico’s Public Schools

The Politics of Memory in Chile: From Pinochet to Bachelet

Cath Collins, Katherine Hite, and Alfredo Joignant, editors

How do individual and collective memories of the repressive Pinochet regime affect the fabric of Chilean politics and society today? How have the politics of memory in Chile—including the official policies and symbolic representations that address the painful violations of the past—evolved over the years since Pinochet's demise? The authors of this important new book provide an    More >

The Politics of Memory in Chile: From Pinochet to Bachelet

The Quality of Democracy in Latin America

Daniel H. Levine and José E. Molina, editors

In considering the nature and future prospects of the current wave of democracies in Latin America, analysis has shifted from a concern with regime change, transitions, and consolidation to a focus on the quality of these democracies. To what extent, for example, do citizens participate and influence decisionmaking? Are elections free and fair? Are there ways of ensuring government    More >

The Quality of Democracy in Latin America

The Reform of the Bolivian State: Domestic Politics in the Context of Globalization

Andreas Tsolakis

In 2005, two decades after President Victor Paz Estenssoro's New Economic Policy heralded the beginning of a profound transformation for Bolivia, violence had become endemic in the country, the economy was weak, and political corruption was flourishing. Evo Morales was elected to the presidency in a climate of intense social conflict and disorder, promising to deconstruct the entire political    More >

The Reform of the Bolivian State: Domestic Politics in the Context of Globalization

The Resurgence of Populism in Latin America

Robert R. Barr

Latin America has recently experienced a powerful resurgence of populism, a phenomenon that has had an outsized influence on the region's politics. What explains this resurgence? And what is distinctive about this new populist era? Answering these questions, Robert Barr offers a refined conceptualization of populism and an intriguing explanation of its recent electoral successes across the    More >

The Resurgence of Populism in Latin America

The Roots of Haitian Despotism

Robert Fatton Jr.

Though founded in the wake of a revolution that embodied its slave population's quest for freedom and equality, Haiti has endured a history marked by an unending pattern of repressive dictatorial regimes. Exploring that history, Robert Fatton offers a rigorous explanation of how and why the legacy of colonialism, the struggle against slavery, and the intersection of the domestic and world    More >

The Roots of Haitian Despotism

The Russians Aren't Coming: New Soviet Policy in Latin America

Wayne S. Smith, editor

Pointing to the dramatic changes in the former Soviet Union and its foreign policies over the past few years, the authors demonstrate that, even before the consequent collapse of communism in the Soviet Union, the fear of Soviet penetration in Latin America, which had driven US policy in the region during the Cold War, had been rendered groundless. They argue that it is high time for the United    More >

The Sandinistas and Nicaragua Since 1979

David Close, Salvador Martí i Puig, and Shelley A. McConnell, editors

How has the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN) affected Nicaragua and its politics since the Sandinista revolution of 1979? Addressing this question, the authors offer a comprehensive assessment, discussing the country's political institutions and public policy, its political culture, and its leadership, as well as the FSLN as a political party. Their focus is on contemporary issues,    More >

The Sandinistas and Nicaragua Since 1979

The Social Costs of Industrial Growth in Northern Mexico

Kathryn Kopinak, editor

The foreign export-processing industry is a global phenomenon, with factories known as maquiladoras in Mexico and Central America. While maquiladoras have gone through second- and third-generation production models, with corresponding research literature from business perspectives, the social analyses of these models and 'Mature Maquilization's' effects on health, the environment, infrastructure,    More >

The Social Costs of Industrial Growth in Northern Mexico

The Social Relations of Mexican Commodities: Power, Production, and Place

Casey Walsh, Elizabeth Emma Ferry, Gabriela Soto Laveaga, Paola Sesia, and Sarah Hill

From the introduction: "How small groups and localities are drawn together into larger political, economic, social, and ideological systems remains a gripping question in historical social science and the study of Latin America. This concern with the articulation of groups within systems informs our understanding of 'the social relations of commodities.' We draw attention to the ways in    More >

The Social Relations of Mexican Commodities: Power, Production, and Place

The Spaces of Neoliberalism: Land, Place, and Family in Latin America

Jacquelyn Chase, editor

In this exploration of people's responses to neoliberal market reforms in Latin America, the authors reveal the ways that local communities negotiate with market power and state policy in their daily lives. The focus of the book is threefold: the politics of land and land reform, the family as a space of negotiation between men and women in their new roles in labor market participation, and    More >

The Spaces of Neoliberalism: Land, Place, and Family in Latin America

The State on the Streets: Police and Politics in Argentina and Brazil

Mercedes S. Hinton

Winner of the British Society of Criminology's Best Book Award! How Latin American governments will respond to popular outcry against unprecedented levels of both corruption and crime ranks among the principal political questions of this decade. The State on the Streets focuses on the tense interplay of police, democracy, state, and civil society in the region, using the cases of Argentina    More >

The State on the Streets: Police and Politics in Argentina and Brazil

The Struggle for Amazon Town: Gurupá Revisited

Richard Pace

Massive changes have engulfed the Brazilian Amazon region in the forty years since Charles Wagley’s landmark study, Amazon Town, was first published. In his engaging restudy, Richard Pace explores today’s "Amazon Town" (Gurupá), where development efforts have left little untouched, little familiar. Focusing on the actions of the community as it faces new opportunities    More >

The Ticos: Culture and Social Change in Costa Rica

Mavis Hiltunen Biesanz, Richard Biesanz, and Karen Zubris Biesanz

This unparalleled social and cultural history traces the development of Costa Rica's culture and institutions. With the perspective of more than half a century of first-hand observation, the Biesanzes describe how Costa Rica's economy, government, educational and health-care systems, family structures, religion, and other institutions have evolved, and how this evolution has    More >

The Ticos: Culture and Social Change in Costa Rica

The Ties That Bind Us: Mexican Migrants in San Diego County

Richard Kiy and Christopher Woodruff, editors

The Ties That Bind Us addresses the difficult living and working conditions of Mexican migrant workers in San Diego County, California, considering policy implications for both sides of the US-Mexico border. The authors highlight the circumstances of individuals who, seeking to escape poverty, come to San Diego hoping to exchange hard work for a chance to get ahead—and who often meet rampant    More >

The Ties That Bind Us: Mexican Migrants in San Diego County

The Transformation of Rural Mexico: Reforming the Ejido Sector

Wayne A. Cornelius and David Myhre, editors

Mexico's rural reforms of the early 1990s were designed to bring corn growers and other largely subsistence farmers into the cultivation of crops with appeal in global markets. This was to be accomplished through the reduction and eventual elimination of subsidies and guarantee prices to basic crops and a relaxation of tenure constraints on ejido land. Contributors to this anthology give us a    More >

The Whistling Bird: Women Writers of the Caribbean

Elaine Campbell and Pierrette Frickey, editors

The Whistling Bird celebrates what were until recently the little-heard voices of women writers from the Caribbean. The anthology includes short stories, poetry, drama, and excerpts from novels—all rich, melodic works written with clarity and conviction.    More >

The Whistling Bird: Women Writers of the Caribbean

Toward Resolution? The Falklands/Malvinas Dispute

Wayne S. Smith, editor

To the British, they are the Falkland Islands; to the Argentines, the Malvinas. The dispute between the two countries over these remote islands has smoldered since 1833, when the British expelled the few Argentine settlers and established their own colony. A century-and-a-half later, in April 1982, Argentina seized the islands by force and war ensued. By June, the islands were again under British    More >

Transcending Neoliberalism: Community-Based Development in Latin America

Henry Veltmeyer and Anthony O'Malley, editors

With a focus on community-based processes, Transcending Neoliberalism examines the dynamics of change in Latin America arising out of the search for alternative forms of development.    More >

Transcending Neoliberalism: Community-Based Development in Latin America

Transnational Crime and Public Security: Challenges to Mexico and the United States

John Bailey and Jorge Chabat, editors

Issues of public security—crime, violence, corruption, and defective law enforcement—all play important roles in the Mexico-U.S. bilateral relationship. The roots of these problems run deep into institutions and practices that have survived the old order. The contributors to this volume shed new light on the determinants of transnational crime and its consequences for domestic politics    More >

Transnational Crime and Public Security: Challenges to Mexico and the United States

Trapped: Modern-Day Slavery in the Brazilian Amazon

Binka Le Breton

In huge ranches deep in the Amazon, thousands of migrant workers are trapped in a web of debt-bondage and deceit. Binka Le Breton sheds light on the lives of these workers, many of whom have lost all contact with their families and hometowns, providing a forum for them to tell their stories in their own words. Le Breton also reports on her interviews with those who benefit from the illegal    More >

Trapped: Modern-Day Slavery in the Brazilian Amazon

Understanding Contemporary Latin America, 4th edition

Richard S. Hillman and Thomas J. D’Agostino, editors

This thoroughly-revised new edition of Understanding Contemporary Latin America has been thoroughly revised to reflect the many significant events and trends of the past six years. The book includes entirely new chapters on economics and religion, as well as extensively updated material on politics, the military, international relations, environmental issues, nationalism, the role of women, and    More >

Understanding Contemporary Latin America, 4th edition

Understanding the Contemporary Caribbean, 2nd Edition

Richard S. Hillman and Thomas J. D’Agostino, editors

Carefully designed to enhance readers’ comprehension of the diversity and complexities of the region, Understanding the Contemporary Caribbean ranges in coverage from history to politics and economics, from the environment to ethnicity, from religion to the Caribbean diaspora. Each topic is covered in an accessible style, but with reference to the latest scholarship. This new edition has    More >

Understanding the Contemporary Caribbean, 2nd Edition

Uruguay’s José Batlle y Ordoñez: The Determined Visionary, 1915-1917

Milton I. Vanger

If one died and could not reach heaven, went the saying in Latin America during the presidency of José Batlle y Ordoñez, one might get at least as far as Batlle’s Uruguay. José Batlle was committed to a vision of advanced democracy that included a plural executive (the Colegiado), state-run enterprises, an eight-hour-maximum workday, women’s rights, and the    More >

Uruguay’s José Batlle y Ordoñez: The Determined Visionary, 1915-1917

USAID in Bolivia: Partner or Patrón?

Lawrence C. Heilman

After Bolivia had received more than $4.7 billion from the US government to support 70 years of development efforts, why would Evo Morales abruptly expel USAID from the country in May 2013? The answer, alleges Lawrence Heilman, is rooted in a complex slice of history beginning with US assistance to Bolivia during World War II. Heilman explores that history from the perspectives of both the US    More >

USAID in Bolivia: Partner or Patrón?

Vanguard Revolutionaries in Latin America: Peru, Colombia, Mexico

James F. Rochlin

During the swan song of the Soviet Union and the immediate aftermath of the Cold War, many insurgent groups that had been dependent on Moscow or Havana quickly faded into political oblivion. But some existing groups, as well as emerging ones, flourished within a new and uncharted political constellation. This comparative study probes the origins and effects of Latin America's most potent    More >

Vanguard Revolutionaries in Latin America: Peru, Colombia, Mexico

Venezuela: Public Opinion and Protest in a Fragile Democracy

Damarys Canache

In this theoretically rich and methodologically sophisticated investigation, Damarys Canache examines the significance of public opinion in Venezuela during the tumultuous 1990s and establishes a new framework for the study of political support in fragile democracies. Canache highlights the importance of mass attitudes regarding democracy as a form of government, showing that what people think    More >

Venezuela: Public Opinion and Protest in a Fragile Democracy

Venezuela’s Polarized Politics: The Paradox of Direct Democracy Under Chávez

Ana L. Mallen and María Pilar García-Guadilla

During Hugo Chávez's presidency, Venezuelan society underwent a sudden—and vicious—split between the Chavistas and the Opposition. What accounts for the extreme intensity of the split? How did differences so quickly become irreconcilable? What role did the media play? Answering these and related questions, Ana Mallen and María Pilar García-Guadilla explore how    More >

Venezuela’s Polarized Politics: The Paradox of Direct Democracy Under Chávez

Venezuelan Politics in the Chávez Era: Class, Polarization, and Conflict

Steve Ellner and Daniel Hellinger, editors

The radical alteration of the political landscape in Venezuela following the electoral triumph of the controversial Hugo Chávez calls for a fresh look at the country's institutions and policies. In response, and challenging much of the scholarly literature on Venezuelan democracy, this book offers a revisionist view of Venezuela's recent political history and a fresh appraisal of    More >

Venezuelan Politics in the Chávez Era: Class, Polarization, and Conflict

Voices from the Amazon

Binka Le Breton

Through jungle and razed landscapes, Binka Le Breton journeyed more than 3,000 miles by bus, truck, boat, and on foot to record the candid words of the people who make the Brazilian Amazon region their home. The compelling  result, Voice of the Amazon, reveals the textures of daily life in the Amazon forest.    More >

Voices from the Amazon

Women and Grass Roots Democracy in the Americas: Sustaining the Initiative, 2nd Edition

Dorrit K. Marks, editor

How can civil society strengthen its influence on that most fragile form of government—democracy? Successful leaders of 31 civic institutions, representing 16 Western Hempishere countries, demonstrate that citizens can indeed have a significant impact on public decisionmaking. Latin American, Caribbean, and North American women discuss their hard-learned lessons in this accessible,    More >

Women and Politics in Chile

Susan Franceschet

Why have women remained marginalized in Chilean politics, even within a context of democratization? Addressing this question, Susan Franceschet traces women's political activism in the country—from the early twentieth century struggles for suffrage to current efforts to expand and deepen the practice of democracy. Franceschet highlights the gendered nature of political participation in    More >

Women and Politics in Chile

Women and the State in Post-Sandinista Nicaragua

Cynthia Chavez Metoyer

After winning a stunning and decisive victory in Nicaragua’s 1990 presidential election, Violeta Chamorro reversed much of the social and economic policy enacted by the previous Sandinista government. Cynthia Chavez Metoyer explores state-society relationships during the Chamorro administration, focusing on the effect that the postsocialist, neoliberal state has had on women. Metoyer first    More >

Women Farmers and Commercial Ventures: Increasing Food Security in Developing Countries

Anita Spring, editor

Women around the world are entering commercial agriculture—and often succeeding—despite development policies designed to exclude them. In this comparative volume, case studies reveal that farm women in Africa, Asia, and Latin America are rapidly becoming more than “subsistence producers. The authors explore the societal and domestic changes brought about as women move from    More >

Women Farmers and Commercial Ventures: Increasing Food Security in Developing Countries