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Surviving Katrina: The Experiences of Low-Income African American Women

Jessica Warner Pardee

Jessica Pardee documents and examines the experiences of low-income African American women during Hurricane Katrina to uncover the ways that race, class, and gender shape the experiences of disasters. Drawing on intimate interviews to explore the complex challenges that these women faced in the course of the hurricane and its aftermath, Pardee reveals how, with so few material resources, they    More >

Surviving Katrina: The Experiences of Low-Income African American Women

Making a Life in Multiethnic Miami: Immigration and the Rise of a Global City

Elizabeth M. Aranda, Sallie Hughes, and Elena Sabogal

With more than a million immigrants from Latin America and the Caribbean, Miami, Florida, boasts the highest proportion of foreign-born residents of any US city. Charting the rise of Miami as a global city, Elizabeth Aranda, Sallie Hughes, and Elena Sabogal provide a panoramic study of the changing dynamics of the immigration experience.             More >

Making a Life in Multiethnic Miami: Immigration and the Rise of a Global City

Black Asset Poverty and the Enduring Racial Divide

Lori Latrice Martin

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! Claims of a postracial society notwithstanding, there are enormous and even expanding differences in the level of assets owned by various racial and ethnic groups—and black families are vastly overrepresented among the asset poor. Lori Martin provides an in-depth exploration of the causes and consequences of racial wealth inequality. Drawing on both    More >

Black Asset Poverty and the Enduring Racial Divide

Race and Justice: Wrongful Convictions of African American Men

Marvin D. Free, Jr. and Mitch Ruesink

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! In this investigation of some 350 wrongful convictions of African American men, Marvin Free and Mitch Ruesink critically examine how issues of race undercut the larger goals of our criminal justice system. Free and Ruesink expand the focus of wrongful conviction studies to include not only homicide, but also sexual assault, drug dealing, and nonviolent    More >

Race and Justice: Wrongful Convictions of African American Men

Dorm Room Dealers: Drugs and the Privileges of Race and Class

A. Rafik Mohamed and Erik D. Fritsvold

Why do affluent, upwardly mobile college students—who have everything to lose and little to gain—choose to sell drugs? Why do law enforcement officers largely overlook drug dealing on college campuses? With rich, lively details, A. Rafik Mohamed and Erik Fritsvold deliver unprecedented insight into the world of college drug dealers—and offer an important corrective to the    More >

Dorm Room Dealers: Drugs and the Privileges of Race and Class

Asian American Racial Realities in Black and White

Bruce Calvin Hoskins

What does it mean for an Asian American to be part white—or part black? Bruce Hoskins probes the experience of biracial Asian Americans, revealing the ways that our discourse about multiracial identities too often reinforces racial hierarchies. Hoskins explores the everyday lives of people of Asian/white and Asian/black heritage to uncover the role of our society's white-black    More >

Asian American Racial Realities in Black and White

Being Brown in Dixie: Race, Ethnicity, and Latino Immigration in the New South

Cameron D. Lippard and Charles A. Gallagher, editors

How has the dramatic influx of Latino populations in the US South challenged and changed traditional conceptions of race? Are barriers facing Latinos the same as those confronted by African Americans? The authors of Being Brown in Dixie use the Latino experience of living and working in the South to explore the shifting complexities of race relations. Systematically considering such central issues    More >

Being Brown in Dixie: Race, Ethnicity, and Latino Immigration in the New South

Reproducing Race: The Paradox of Generation Mix

Rainier Spencer

Is postraciality just around the corner? How realistic are the often-heard pronouncements that mixed-race identity is leading the United States to its postracial future? In his provocative analysis, Rainier Spencer illuminates the assumptions that multiracial ideology in fact shares with concepts of both white supremacy and antiblackness. Spencer links the mulatto past with the mulatto present    More >

Reproducing Race: The Paradox of Generation Mix

Safe Haven? A History of Refugees in America

David W. Haines

In his masterful study of the relationship between refugees and the United States, covering seven decades of immigration history, David Haines shows how both the refugees and their new communities have struggled with national and ethnic identities, and also the effect that this struggle has had on US institutions and attitudes.    More >

Safe Haven? A History of Refugees in America

Race, Gender, and the Labor Market: Inequalities at Work

Robert L. Kaufman

Women and minorities have entered higher-paying occupations, but their overall earnings still lag behind those of white men. Why? Looking nationwide at workers across all employment levels and occupations, Robert Kaufman examines the unexpected ways that prejudice and workplace discrimination continue to plague the labor market. Kaufman probes the mechanisms by which race and sex groups are    More >

Race, Gender, and the Labor Market: Inequalities at Work

Equal Work, Unequal Careers: African Americans in the Workforce

Rochelle Parks-Yancy

Why do some people get ahead in the workplace, while others, equally qualified, fall behind? Rochelle Parks-Yancy uses the experience of African American workers across the US to reveal how the forces of inequality and social capital shape long-term occupational success. Parks-Yancy's mixed-methods approach probes the ways that people find jobs, lose jobs, and get promoted, illuminating the    More >

Equal Work, Unequal Careers: African Americans in the Workforce

Brazil's New Racial Politics

Bernd Reiter and Gladys L. Mitchell, editors

As the popular myth of racial equality in Brazil crumbles beneath the weight of current grassroots politics, how will the country redefine itself as a multiethnic nation? Brazil’s New Racial Politics captures the myriad questions and problems unleashed by a growing awareness of the ways racism structures Brazilian society. The authors bridge the gap between scholarship and activism as    More >

Brazil's New Racial Politics

Living Our Religions: Hindu and Muslim South Asian-American Women Narrate Their Experiences

Anjana Narayan and Bandana Purkayastha

Living Our Religions sheds important light on the lives of Hindu and Muslim American women of South Asian origin. As the authors reveal their diverse and culturally dynamic religious practices, describe the race, gender, and ethnic boundaries that they encounter, and document how they resist and challenge these boundaries, they cut through the myths and ethnocentrism of popular portrayals to    More >

Living Our Religions: Hindu and Muslim South Asian-American Women Narrate Their Experiences

Immigrants and Modern Racism: Reproducing Inequality

Beth Frankel Merenstein

With rising numbers of immigrants of color in the United States, sheer demographic change has long promised—falsely, it now seems—to solve the "race problem." Directly connecting the issues of race relations and immigrant incorporation, Beth Merenstein sheds light on what the changing contours of the US's racial and ethnic makeup mean for our dearly held concept of    More >

Immigrants and Modern Racism: Reproducing Inequality

Racial Divide: Racial and Ethnic Bias in the Criminal Justice System

Michael J. Lynch, E. Britt Patterson, and Kristina K. Childs, editors

How is the racial divide in US society reflected in the practices of the nation's criminal justice system? Documenting a persistent pattern of institutionalized racial and ethnic discrimination at every stage of the system, the authors focus on issues of policing, the adult and juvenile court systems, prisons, the application of the death penalty, the science of forensics, and the incidence of    More >

Racial Divide: Racial and Ethnic Bias in the Criminal Justice System

Interracial Contact and Social Change

George Yancey

In this thought-provoking analysis, George Yancey reevaluates the controversial "contact hypothesis" as he explores if and when interracial contact can combat the racial animosity and inequality permeating US society. Yancey draws on quantitative and qualitative investigations of interracial religious congregations, families, and friendships to demonstrate that extensive interactions    More >

Interracial Contact and Social Change

Puerto Ricans in the United States: A Contemporary Portrait

Edna Acosta-Belén and Carlos E. Santiago

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! Though their presence in the United States is long standing, knowledge about Puerto Ricans—their culture, history, socioeconomic status, and contributions has been decidedly inadequate. Edna Acosta-Belén and Carlos Santiago change this status quo, presenting a nuanced portrait of both the community today and the trajectory of its development. The    More >

Puerto Ricans in the United States: A Contemporary Portrait

Challenging Multiracial Identity

Rainier Spencer

What is multiracialism—and what are the theoretical consequences and practical costs of asserting a multiracial identity? Arguing that the multiracial movement bolsters, rather than subverts, traditional categories of race, Rainier Spencer critically assesses current scholarship in support of multiracial identity.    More >

Challenging Multiracial Identity

The Black Middle Class: Social Mobility—and Vulnerability

Benjamin P. Bowser

The widespread presence of successful African Americans in virtually all walks of life has led many in the United States to believe that the races are now on an equal footing—and that color blindness is the most appropriate way to deal with racial difference. In strong contrast, Benjamin Bowser argues that the seemingly comparable black and white middle classes, while inextricably linked, in    More >

The Black Middle Class: Social Mobility—and Vulnerability

Mixed Messages: Multiracial Identities in the "Color-Blind" Era

David L. Brunsma, editor

The experiences and voices of multiracial individuals are challenging current categories of race, profoundly altering the meaning of racial identity and in the process changing the cultural fabric of the nation. Exploring this new reality, the authors of Mixed Messages examine what we know about multiracial identities—and the implications of those identities for fundamental issues of justice    More >

Mixed Messages: Multiracial Identities in the "Color-Blind" Era

Privileged Places: Race, Residence, and the Structure of Opportunity

Gregory D. Squires and Charis E. Kubrin

Now priced for course use! In the United States today, quality of life depends heavily on where one lives—but high levels of racial segregation in residential communities make it frustratingly difficult to disentangle the effects of place from those of race. Gregory Squires and Charis Kubrin tackle these issues head-on, exploring how inequities resulting from the intersection of race and    More >

Privileged Places: Race, Residence, and the Structure of Opportunity

Racial Issues in Criminal Justice: The Case of African Americans

Marvin D. Free, Jr., editor

This important collection sheds light on the disproportionate number of African Americans incarcerated or otherwise embroiled in the US criminal justice system, focusing on both the origins and impact of the phenomenon.    More >

Who Is White?: Latinos, Asians, and the New Black/Nonblack Divide

George Yancey

"By the year 2050, whites will be a numerical racial minority, albeit the largest minority, in the United States." This statement, asserts George Yancey, while statistically correct, is nonetheless false. Yancey marshals compelling evidence to show that the definition of who is "white" is changing rapidly, with nonblack minorities accepting the perspectives of the current    More >

Who Is White?: Latinos, Asians, and the New Black/Nonblack Divide

Race in the Schools: Perpetuating White Dominance?

Judith R. Blau

Winner of the ASA Oliver Cromwell Cox Award Judith Blau's disturbing study presents strong evidence that our schools, assumed by many to be an equalizing force in U.S. society, are in fact racialized settings that reproduce white advantage—to the detriment of all students.   Drawing on rich, longitudinal databases, Blau explores the values, activities, and educational experiences    More >

Race in the Schools: Perpetuating White Dominance?

Reverse Discrimination: Dismantling the Myth

Fred L. Pincus

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! How pervasive is reverse discrimination in the United States today? What exactly is "affirmative action"? Fred Pincus investigates the nature and scope of reverse discrimination, questioning what effect affirmative action actually has on white men. Beginning with the early opposition to the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Pincus traces the evolution of the idea    More >

Reverse Discrimination: Dismantling the Myth

Borrowing Inequality: Race, Class, and Student Loans

Derek V. Price

As the cost of higher education continues to rise, students increasingly rely on borrowing to pay for college. But is the result the improved socioeconomic position that they anticipate? Borrowing Inequality explores the real impact of loans on minority and low-income students.   Drawing on a national study of student-borrowing patterns, Derek Price finds that racial and ethnic minorities    More >

Borrowing Inequality: Race, Class, and Student Loans

Race, Class, and the State in Contemporary Sociology: The William Julius Wilson Debates

Jack Niemonen

A comprehensive guide to the current race-class debate in sociology, Race,Class, and the State traces the evolution of the controversy and analyzes current trends in the field. Focusing on the work legacy of William Julius Wilson and the arguments of his longstanding critics, Niemonen deftly illustrates the strengths, weaknesses, and influence of Wilson's work. His fair-minded but critical    More >

Race, Class, and the State in Contemporary Sociology: The William Julius Wilson Debates

The Latino Male: A Radical Redefinition

David T. Abalos

What does it mean to be a Latino man in the United States today? David Abalos shows how the traditional cultural stories—the male roles of the mujeriego (the womanizer), the macho, and the patriarch—are becoming unlivable. Too many men choose manipulation, power, or violence in response, in an effort to restore the old order. But there is an alternative, argues Abalos. Demonstrating    More >

The Latino Male: A Radical Redefinition

White Supremacy and Racism in the Post-Civil Rights Era

Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

Co-Winner of the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award of the ASA Racial and Ethnic Minorities Section! Is a racial structure still firmly in place in the United States? White Supremacy and Racism answers that question with an unequivocal yes, describing a contemporary system that operates in a covert, subtle, institutional, and superficially nonracial fashion. Assessing the major perspectives that social    More >

White Supremacy and Racism in the Post-Civil Rights Era

Black Bostonians: Family Life and Community Struggle in the Antebellum North, Revised Edition

James Oliver Horton and Lois E. Horton

Updated and expanded in this revised edition to reflect twenty years of new research, when published in 1979 Black Bostonians was the first comprehensive social history of an antebellum northern black community. The Hortons challenged the then widely held view that African Americans in the antebellum urban north were all trapped in "a culture of poverty." Exploring life in black    More >

Black Bostonians: Family Life and Community Struggle in the Antebellum North, Revised Edition

Making a Life Building a Community: A History of the Jews of Hartford

David G. Dalin and Jonathan Rosenbaum

In the first analytical history of this important Jewish community, David G. Dalin and Jonathan Rosenbaum draw extensively on primary sources to place Hartford within the larger contexts of US social, urban, ethnic, and Jewish history.    More >

Making a Life Building a Community: A History of the Jews of Hartford