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A History of Egyptian Communism: Jews and Their Compatriots in Quest of Revolution

Rami Ginat

Rami Ginat offers an entirely new reading of the evolution of communism in Egypt, including the central role of Egyptian Jews in both its development and its impact on Egypt and the wider Middle East. Drawing deeply on previously inaccessible original sources, Ginat traces a story of intrigue and ideology from the late 1910s to the early 1950s. Many of his findings directly challenge the    More >

A History of Egyptian Communism: Jews and Their Compatriots in Quest of Revolution

A Jewish Mother From Berlin [a novel] and Susanna [a novella]

Gertrud Kolmar, translated from the German by Brigitte M. Goldstein

In these two extraordinary works, published posthumously, Gertrude Kolmar's elegiac prose transports us into her characters' rich inner worlds even as it depicts the cold material realities of 1920s Berlin. In A Jewish Mother from Berlin, Martha Jadassohn's seemingly conventional life descends into chaos after the brutal rape of her five-year-old daughter. The ethereally beautiful    More >

A Jewish Mother From Berlin [a novel] and Susanna [a novella]

A Small Place in Galilee: Religion and Social Conflict in an Israeli Village

Zvi Sobel

Zvi Sobel's absorbing book draws readers into the world of Yavneel, a small Israeli village that is home to several diverse communities: the established core of settler-farmers, new immigrants from North Africa and the Middle East, and, since 1986, the ultraorthodox Bratslav Hasidim. Yavneel has become a microcosm of Israeli society at large, reflecting the country's social, religious,    More >

A Small Place in Galilee: Religion and Social Conflict in an Israeli Village

Afterimages: A Family Memoir

Carol Ascher

In her moving reflection on growing up as the daughter of refugees from Hitler's Europe, Carol Ascher explores the conflicts of an émigré childhood and chronicles her return to Vienna to uncover her father's roots.    More >

Afterimages: A Family Memoir

Apples of Gold in Filigrees of Silver: Jewish Writing in the Eye of the Spanish Inquisition

Colbert I. Nepaulsingh

During the Spanish Inquisition, daring individuals defied and thwarted persecution by writing works in which hidden meanings were apparent only to Jews or fellow conversos, the descendants of Jewish converts to Christianity. Colbert Nepaulsingh analyzes three seminal, sixteenth-century novels as converso works—Lazarillo, a prototype of the picaresque novel; El Abencerraje, of the Moorish    More >

Apples of Gold in Filigrees of Silver: Jewish Writing in the Eye of the Spanish Inquisition

Branching Out: German-Jewish Immigration to the United States, 1820–1914

Avraham Barkai

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! Branching Out vividly tells the story of the migration of many thousands of German Jews—mostly poor, enterprising young people—to the US during the nineteenth century. Avraham Barkai draws on rare letters, diaries, memoirs, newspapers, journals, and other firsthand accounts as he chronicles the immigrants’ experiences in towns and cities    More >

Branching Out: German-Jewish Immigration to the United States, 1820–1914

Building the Future: Jewish Immigrant Intellectuals and the Making of Tsukunft

Steven Cassedy, editor and translator

First published in 1892, Di Tsukunft [The Future]—the world's oldest and longest-running Yiddish publication—was touted as a sophisticated monthly that would enlighten Jewish immigrants with its political savvy and intellectual content. Steven Cassedy has gathered and translated articles from Di Tsukunft’s inception through 1914, providing an invaluable window into Jewish    More >

Building the Future: Jewish Immigrant Intellectuals and the Making of Tsukunft

Christians and Jews in the Ottoman Empire: The Abridged Edition, with a New Introduction

Benjamin Braude, editor

How did the vast Ottoman Empire, stretching from the Balkans to the Sahara, endure for more than four centuries despite its great ethnic and religious diversity? The classic work on this plural society, the two-volume Christians and Jews in the Ottoman Empire, offered seminal reinterpretations of the empire's core institutions and has sparked more than a generation of innovative work since it    More >

Christians and Jews in the Ottoman Empire: The Abridged Edition, with a New Introduction

Daughters of Sarah: Anthology of Jewish Women Writing in French

Eva Martin Sartori and Madeleine Cottenet-Hage, editors

National Jewish Book Awards Finalist! The editors have gathered a treasure trove of excerpts (some translated into English for the first time) from a variety of genres—novels, short stories, letters, plays, poetry, autobiographies—to showcase the work of both well-known and less familiar French Jewish women writers from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The collection    More >

Daughters of Sarah: Anthology of Jewish Women Writing in French

Edge of the Diaspora: Two Centuries of Jewish Settlement in Australia, Second Revised Edition

Suzanne D. Rutland

Suzanne Rutland charts the vibrant history of the Australian Jewish community from its convict origins through the turmoil of the twentieth century.    More >

Edge of the Diaspora: Two Centuries of Jewish Settlement in Australia, Second Revised Edition

Escape via Siberia: A Jewish Child’s Odyssey of Survival

Dorit Bader Whiteman, with a foreword by Yaffa Eliach

Through the dramatic true story of one boy—Eliott "Lonek" Jaroslawicz—Dorit Bader Whiteman coveys the stories of the dramatic escape of thousands of Polish Jews from the encroaching Nazi menace. Whiteman draws on hours of interviews with Jaroslawicz, as well as extensive archival and other research, to narrate this saga of the only Kindertransport to leave from Russia.    More >

Escape via Siberia: A Jewish Child’s Odyssey of Survival

Fighting Back: Lithuanian Jewry’s Armed Resistance to the Nazis, 1941–1945

Dov Levin, translated from the Hebrew by Moshe Kohn and Dina Cohen

Fighting Back chronicles the activities of the Lithuanian Jews who fought against the Nazis—in the Soviet army, in the forests, in the ghettos of Vilna, Kovno, Shavli, and Svencian, and even in the concentration camps. Dov Levin, a member of the Kovno ghetto underground and then a fighter with the Lithuanian partisans, brings both meticulous scholarship and his own personal experience to    More >

Fighting Back: Lithuanian Jewry’s Armed Resistance to the Nazis, 1941–1945

From Herzl to Rabin: The Changing Image of Zionism

Amnon Rubinstein

Amnon Rubinstein traces the history of the Israeli state, and of Zionism, moving deftly between the roles of objective historian and persuasive politician.    More >

From Herzl to Rabin: The Changing Image of Zionism

Girl with Two Landscapes: The Wartime Diary of Lena Jedwab, 1941-1945

Lena Jedwab Rozenberg, translated by Solon Beinfeld, with a foreword by Irena Klepfisz, and an introduction by Jan T. Gross

In June 1941, sixteen-year-old Lena Jedwab left her home in Poland and arrived at summer camp in Russia—just as Germany invaded the Soviet Union. Stranded in a children's home in Russia, she began to keep a diary, eloquently chronicling her experiences as she confronted the turmoil and terror of war, the unknown fate of her family (killed by the Nazis at Treblinka), and her own    More >

Girl with Two Landscapes: The Wartime Diary of Lena Jedwab, 1941-1945

Goodbye, Evil Eye: Stories

Gloria DeVidas Kirchheimer

National Jewish Book Awards Finalist! Humorous and endearing, while dealing with complex issues, the stories in Goodbye, Evil Eye reflect the tensions between Sephardic Jews and contemporary urban life in the United States. The characters—with their superstitions, myths, and contradictions, the still-palpable heritage of the Inquisition and the expulsion of the Jews from Spain—fight    More >

Goodbye, Evil Eye: Stories

Hitler’s Death Camps: The Sanity of Madness

Konnilyn G. Feig

"Why does a Gentile with a strong Lutheran background put her mind and heart into the Holocaust for twenty long years?... Unless I confront, I betray those who suffered so dreadfully." Thus Konnilyn Feig begins her riveting study of the Nazi concentration camps and the people and system that maintained them. Based on two decades of study, including multiple visits to all nineteen of    More >

Hitler’s Death Camps: The Sanity of Madness

Making a Life Building a Community: A History of the Jews of Hartford

David G. Dalin and Jonathan Rosenbaum

In the first analytical history of this important Jewish community, David G. Dalin and Jonathan Rosenbaum draw extensively on primary sources to place Hartford within the larger contexts of US social, urban, ethnic, and Jewish history.    More >

Making a Life Building a Community: A History of the Jews of Hartford

Never Too Late to Remember: The Politics Behind New York City’s Holocaust Museum

Rochelle G. Saidel

Why did New York City, the largest center of Jewish culture and home to more survivors than any other city in the United States, take more than half a century to finalize plans for its Holocaust memorial? Rochelle Saidel offers a detailed analysis of how local power brokers, real estate developers, major political players, and various groups within the national Jewish community      More >

Never Too Late to Remember: The Politics Behind New York City’s Holocaust Museum

Old Demons, New Debates: Anti-Semitism in the West

David I. Kertzer, editor

National Jewish Book Awards Finalist! Old Demons, New Debates offers a provocative new view of the recent upsurge of anti-Semitism in the West. The authors show how today's anti-Semitism draws on older forms of hatred toward Jews while being fueled by both anti-American and anti-Zionist sentiments—and how, far from being the exclusive province of the ignorant and unlettered, it is    More >

Old Demons, New Debates: Anti-Semitism in the West

Passionate Pioneers: The Story of Yiddish Secular Education in North America, 1910-1960

Fradle Pomerantz Freidenreich, with a foreword by Jonathan D. Sarna

A little-known chapter in American Jewish history involves a wide network of Yiddish schools and camps—a vibrant, multifaceted educational movement—that sought to transmit a distinctive sense of secular yiddishkayt, or Jewishness. The first comprehensive record of this movement, Passionate Pioneers documents the myriad challenges, frustrations, and accomplishments of Yiddish secular    More >

Passionate Pioneers: The Story of Yiddish Secular Education in North America, 1910-1960

People Walk on Their Heads: Jews and Judaism New York

Moses Weinberger, translated from the Hebrew and with an introduction by Jonathan D. Sarna

In 1880 a young Hungarian rabbi named Moses Weinberger arrived in New York City. Seven years later, he described—and deplored—a world turned upside down, where "people walk on their heads." In what has become a classic example of Jewish immigrant protest literature, Weinberger urges American Jews to defend their faith more forthrightly. Jonathan Sarna's translation    More >

People Walk on Their Heads: Jews and Judaism New York

Reevaluating the Third Reich

Thomas Childers and Jane Caplan, editors with a foreword by Charles S. Maier

In this thought-provoking volume, the work of distinguished scholars exposes the contradictory implications and shifting paradigms of recent historical work on Nazism. The authors' controversial analyses are certain to provoke still further debate as they expand our knowledge of the complex dynamics at play in Nazi Germany.    More >

Reevaluating the Third Reich

Remembering Jewish Amsterdam

Philo Bregstein and Salvador Bloemgarten, editors translated from the Dutch by Wanda Boeke

National Jewish Book Awards Finalist When the Germans overpowered the Netherlands in 1940, there were some 140,000 Dutch citizens who were considered Jews by Nationalist Socialist standards; more than half of them, about 80,000, lived in Amsterdam. Remembering Jewish Amsterdam is a celebration of their lives. The book consists of selections from seventy-seven interviews with Holocaust survivors    More >

Remembering Jewish Amsterdam

Rescuers: Portraits of Moral Courage in the Holocaust

Gay Block and Malka Drucker, with a Prologue by Cynthia Ozick

Who are the rescuers, the men and women whose gripping personal narratives make up the core of this remarkable book? Why did they risk everything—even their lives and those of their families—to save Jews marked for death during the Holocaust?  Gay Block and Malka Drucker present forty nine extraordinary personal accounts of rescuers from a dozen countries across    More >

Rescuers: Portraits of Moral Courage in the Holocaust

The American Jewish Experience, 2nd edition

Jonathan D. Sarna, editor

Offering a range of the liveliest, most informative writing on Jews in America from colonial times to the present, the revised edition of this popular collection, with nine new chapters, explores both contemporary issues and traditional areas of interest. An editor's note preceding each chapter highlights context and relevance, and a bibliographic essay follows each section.    More >

The American Jewish Experience, 2nd edition

The Destruction of the European Jews, student edition

Raul Hilberg

This student edition of The Destruction of the European Jews makes accessible for classroom use Raul Hilberg's landmark account of Germany's annihilation of Europe's Jewish communities in 1933-1945. Perhaps more than any other book, it answers the question: "How did it happen?"    More >

The Destruction of the European Jews, student edition

The Distant Friend [a novel]

Claude Roy, translated by Hugh A. Harter, with an introduction by Jack Kolbert

Nothing ever happens to Etienne. Born into a provincial French family, he grows up in the shadow of his ambitious successful brother. His personality passive, his life uneventful, he is resigned to his own inferiority—-until he meets Stefan. German, Jewish, outgoing, and cosmopolitan, Stefan Stein could hardly be more unlike Etienne. Yet, when the two young teenagers first meet, they form a    More >

The Distant Friend [a novel]

The Jews of Latin America, 3rd Edition

Judith Laikin Elkin

When it was first published in 1980, Judith Laikin Elkin's foundational book on the Jewish communities of Latin America quickly became the standard resource on the topic. This new edition, the first in fifteen years, brings the story up-to-date, incorporating the events of recent decades and reflecting new insights provoked by the changing political, cultural, and economic conditions    More >

The Jews of Latin America, 3rd Edition

The Pletzl of Paris: Jewish Immigrant Workers in the Belle Epoque

Nancy L. Green

In a challenging new interpretation of Jewish immigrant history, Nancy L. Green traces the westward movement of East European Jews to France during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and explores their experiences as immigrant workers. By 1914 some 40,000 East European Jews had settled in France, many of them in Paris's Marais district, known in Yiddish as the Pletzl, or    More >

The Pletzl of Paris: Jewish Immigrant Workers in the Belle Epoque

The Politics of Inclusion and Exclusion: Jews and Nationalism in Hungary

Vera Ranki, with a foreword by Randolph L. Braham

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! Tracing the social history of Jews in Hungary from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, Vera Ranki reveals how state policies shifted from encouraging assimilation to institutionalizing anti-Semitism. Her study provides a poignant illustration of the changing politics of nationalism, the failures of inclusion policies, and the role of the political    More >

The Politics of Inclusion and Exclusion: Jews and Nationalism in Hungary

The Unheeded Warning, 1918–1933 [a memoir]

Manès Sperber, translated from the German by Harry Zohn

The Unheeded Warning richly portrays the turbulent interwar period in Vienna and Berlin through the eyes of one of the century's foremost intellectuals and activists. Psychologist, novelist, essayist, and revolutionary, Manès Sperber begins his story in Vienna when he was thirteen years old and concludes the book—which is the second volume of his three-volume autobiography, All    More >

The Unheeded Warning, 1918–1933 [a memoir]

Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968

Heda Margolius Kovály, translated by Franci Epstein and Helen Epstein with the author

Heda Margolius Kovály (1919–2010) endured both the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz and the brutality of Czechoslovakia's postwar Stalinist government. Her husband, after surviving Dachau and Auschwitz and becoming Czechoslovakia's deputy minister of foreign trade, was convicted of conspiracy in the infamous 1952 Slansky trial and then executed. Her clear-eyed memoir of her life    More >

Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968

Until My Eyes Are Closed With Shards [a memoir]

Manès Sperber, translated from the German by Harry Zohn

Acclaimed as one of the most vivid and evocative autobiographies of the century, Manès Sperber’s trilogy All Our Yesterdays concludes in this final volume. Through the eyes of this eminent European intellectual and activist, we witness the years 1934–1984 including hostility between Croats and Serbs in Yugoslavia, the abortive workers' uprising in Vienna, and Stalin's    More >

Until My Eyes Are Closed With Shards [a memoir]

Visions, Images, and Dreams: Yiddish Film—Past and Present, revised edition

Eric A. Goldman

From the early Yiddish silent movies, to the innovative Soviet-supported productions of the 1920s, to the Golden Age of the 1930s, to the present revival of the genre, Eric Goldman traces the history of Yiddish cinema and the people who shaped its development. Goldman viewed scores of films (some of them considered lost) and combed archives in Europe, the former Soviet Union, and the United    More >

Visions, Images, and Dreams: Yiddish Film—Past and Present, revised edition

Where She Came From: A Daughter’s Search for Her Mother’s History

Helen Epstein

After the death of her mother, author and journalist Helen Epstein set out to uncover her mother's past and to learn more about her grandmother and great-grandmother, victims of the Holocaust. The result is this compelling biography, both a chronicle of three generations of women and a social history of Czechoslovakia's Jews.    More >

Where She Came From: A Daughter’s Search for Her Mother’s History

Writing and the Holocaust

Berel Lang, editor

Reflecting on their own work and offering incisive analysis, prominent writers such as Aharon Appelfeld, Raul Hilberg, Irving Howe, and Cynthia Ozick explore the ways in which the historical and moral devastation of the Holocaust has affected subsequent writing about the Holocaust. Among the questions that they address: Does the enormity of the Holocaust preclude adequate representation by    More >

Writing and the Holocaust

Writing the Book of Esther [a novel]

Henri Roczymow, translated from the French by Dori Katz

Mathieu, the narrator of this novel, is compelled by his older sister's suicide to confront the effects of his family's tragic past. Born after the war, Mathieu is left to grapple with recovering his sister's memories—which he had resolutely tried to deny—and with it the meaning of his own identity, family origins, and historical predicament. As neither victim, survivor,    More >

Writing the Book of Esther [a novel]