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BOOKS

Afterimages: A Family Memoir

Carol Ascher

In her moving reflection on growing up as the daughter of refugees from Hitler's Europe, Carol Ascher explores the conflicts of an émigré childhood and chronicles her return to Vienna to uncover her father's roots.    More >

Afterimages: A Family Memoir

Escape via Siberia: A Jewish Child’s Odyssey of Survival

Dorit Bader Whiteman, with a foreword by Yaffa Eliach

Through the dramatic true story of one boy—Eliott "Lonek" Jaroslawicz—Dorit Bader Whiteman coveys the stories of the dramatic escape of thousands of Polish Jews from the encroaching Nazi menace. Whiteman draws on hours of interviews with Jaroslawicz, as well as extensive archival and other research, to narrate this saga of the only Kindertransport to leave from Russia.    More >

Escape via Siberia: A Jewish Child’s Odyssey of Survival

Fighting Back: Lithuanian Jewry’s Armed Resistance to the Nazis, 1941–1945

Dov Levin, translated from the Hebrew by Moshe Kohn and Dina Cohen

Fighting Back chronicles the activities of the Lithuanian Jews who fought against the Nazis—in the Soviet army, in the forests, in the ghettos of Vilna, Kovno, Shavli, and Svencian, and even in the concentration camps. Dov Levin, a member of the Kovno ghetto underground and then a fighter with the Lithuanian partisans, brings both meticulous scholarship and his own personal experience to    More >

Fighting Back: Lithuanian Jewry’s Armed Resistance to the Nazis, 1941–1945

Girl with Two Landscapes: The Wartime Diary of Lena Jedwab, 1941-1945

Lena Jedwab Rozenberg, translated by Solon Beinfeld, with a foreword by Irena Klepfisz, and an introduction by Jan T. Gross

In June 1941, sixteen-year-old Lena Jedwab left her home in Poland and arrived at summer camp in Russia—just as Germany invaded the Soviet Union. Stranded in a children's home in Russia, she began to keep a diary, eloquently chronicling her experiences as she confronted the turmoil and terror of war, the unknown fate of her family (killed by the Nazis at Treblinka), and her own    More >

Girl with Two Landscapes: The Wartime Diary of Lena Jedwab, 1941-1945

Hitler’s Death Camps: The Sanity of Madness

Konnilyn G. Feig

"Why does a Gentile with a strong Lutheran background put her mind and heart into the Holocaust for twenty long years?... Unless I confront, I betray those who suffered so dreadfully." Thus Konnilyn Feig begins her riveting study of the Nazi concentration camps and the people and system that maintained them. Based on two decades of study, including multiple visits to all nineteen of    More >

Hitler’s Death Camps: The Sanity of Madness

Never Too Late to Remember: The Politics Behind New York City’s Holocaust Museum

Rochelle G. Saidel

Why did New York City, the largest center of Jewish culture and home to more survivors than any other city in the United States, take more than half a century to finalize plans for its Holocaust memorial? Rochelle Saidel offers a detailed analysis of how local power brokers, real estate developers, major political players, and various groups within the national Jewish community      More >

Never Too Late to Remember: The Politics Behind New York City’s Holocaust Museum

Reevaluating the Third Reich

Thomas Childers and Jane Caplan, editors with a foreword by Charles S. Maier

In this thought-provoking volume, the work of distinguished scholars exposes the contradictory implications and shifting paradigms of recent historical work on Nazism. The authors' controversial analyses are certain to provoke still further debate as they expand our knowledge of the complex dynamics at play in Nazi Germany.    More >

Reevaluating the Third Reich

Rescuers: Portraits of Moral Courage in the Holocaust

Gay Block and Malka Drucker, with a Prologue by Cynthia Ozick

Who are the rescuers, the men and women whose gripping personal narratives make up the core of this remarkable book? Why did they risk everything—even their lives and those of their families—to save Jews marked for death during the Holocaust?  Gay Block and Malka Drucker present forty nine extraordinary personal accounts of rescuers from a dozen countries across    More >

Rescuers: Portraits of Moral Courage in the Holocaust

The Destruction of the European Jews, student edition

Raul Hilberg

This student edition of The Destruction of the European Jews makes accessible for classroom use Raul Hilberg's landmark account of Germany's annihilation of Europe's Jewish communities in 1933-1945. Perhaps more than any other book, it answers the question: "How did it happen?"    More >

The Destruction of the European Jews, student edition

The Final Solution and the German Foreign Office: A Study of Referat D III of Abteilung Deutschland 1940-1943

Christopher R. Browning

The Jewish policy of the Third Reich did not stem solely from Hitler's pronounced anti-Semitism; it also grew out of subdivisions and feuds within the Nazi regime and the failure of earlier attempts to find solutions to "the Jewish problem." Christopher Browning exploits heretofore little-used material from the German Foreign Office archives, as well as transcripts from war criminal    More >

The Final Solution and the German Foreign Office: A Study of Referat D III of Abteilung Deutschland 1940-1943

The Politics of Inclusion and Exclusion: Jews and Nationalism in Hungary

Vera Ranki, with a foreword by Randolph L. Braham

Choice Outstanding Academic Book! Tracing the social history of Jews in Hungary from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, Vera Ranki reveals how state policies shifted from encouraging assimilation to institutionalizing anti-Semitism. Her study provides a poignant illustration of the changing politics of nationalism, the failures of inclusion policies, and the role of the political    More >

The Politics of Inclusion and Exclusion: Jews and Nationalism in Hungary

Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968

Heda Margolius Kovály, translated by Franci Epstein and Helen Epstein with the author

Heda Margolius Kovály (1919–2010) endured both the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz and the brutality of Czechoslovakia's postwar Stalinist government. Her husband, after surviving Dachau and Auschwitz and becoming Czechoslovakia's deputy minister of foreign trade, was convicted of conspiracy in the infamous 1952 Slansky trial and then executed. Her clear-eyed memoir of her life    More >

Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968

War Crimes of the Deutsche Bank and the Dresdner Bank: Office of Military Government (U.S.) Reports

Christopher Simpson, editor

In 1946-1947 the Finance Division of the Office of Military Government (OMGUS)  recommended that Deutsche Bank and Dresdner Bank leaders be tried as war criminals and barred from ever holding positions of importance in German economic and political life. But these recommendations were never implemented, and officials from both banks went on to become key figures in German postwar development.    More >

War Crimes of the Deutsche Bank and the Dresdner Bank: Office of Military Government (U.S.) Reports

Where She Came From: A Daughter’s Search for Her Mother’s History

Helen Epstein

After the death of her mother, author and journalist Helen Epstein set out to uncover her mother's past and to learn more about her grandmother and great-grandmother, victims of the Holocaust. The result is this compelling biography, both a chronicle of three generations of women and a social history of Czechoslovakia's Jews.    More >

Where She Came From: A Daughter’s Search for Her Mother’s History

Writing and the Holocaust

Berel Lang, editor

Reflecting on their own work and offering incisive analysis, prominent writers such as Aharon Appelfeld, Raul Hilberg, Irving Howe, and Cynthia Ozick explore the ways in which the historical and moral devastation of the Holocaust has affected subsequent writing about the Holocaust. Among the questions that they address: Does the enormity of the Holocaust preclude adequate representation by    More >

Writing and the Holocaust

Writing the Book of Esther [a novel]

Henri Roczymow, translated from the French by Dori Katz

Mathieu, the narrator of this novel, is compelled by his older sister's suicide to confront the effects of his family's tragic past. Born after the war, Mathieu is left to grapple with recovering his sister's memories—which he had resolutely tried to deny—and with it the meaning of his own identity, family origins, and historical predicament. As neither victim, survivor,    More >

Writing the Book of Esther [a novel]